Kids Food and Beverage Market in the U.S., 8th Edition

Mar 14, 2016
121 Pages - Pub ID: LA5916745
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Kids Food and Beverage Market in the U.S., 8th Edition

Children’s influence on weekly grocery spending is pronounced: some 43% of households with kids spend in excess of $150 each week on groceries, compared to 16.1% of households without kids. And for kids, cold cereal is a big winner: among 21 different food and beverage categories, cold cereal rules the roost: Some 14% of all household cold cereal by volume is eaten by children, who eat about 36% of the cereal in their own homes. However, fruit snacks are the volume share leaders: kids eat 40% of fruit snacks in households with children.

When shopping for food and beverages at the supermarket on behalf of their kids, nutrition is at the top of parents’ lists: nearly half (46%) list nutritional value as most important when choosing foods for their children. And while parents want to ensure that their kids enjoy the food, marketers need to appeal to both kids and parents, in part because parents will often share the same meals but also because the foods they select for their children reflect their personal values about what is healthful. But it’s about a lot more than just health: convenience, pricing, usage occasion flexibility, and packaging are among key factors shaping kids’ usage of foods and beverages. And with Millennial parents now accounting for 42% of all households with children, generational shifts are moving the kids food and beverage market in new directions.

The Kids Food and Beverage Market in the U.S. delves deeply into and beyond these themes, helping industry participants hone their marketing and product development strategies accordingly.

The report analyzes and trends seven food and beverage categories significant to children’s eating choices, usage occasions and need states, including breakfast foods, lunch foods, and dinner foods; sweet snacks and salty snacks; produce; and beverages.

Each category analysis includes trended usage of specific foods and beverages over a ten-year period (2006-2015) among households, drilling into households with children by key demographics (in particularly parents’ gender, generation, and HH income). Marketing strategies and product innovation relevant to each category’s position in the kids’ food and beverage market is also included, with careful consideration of how marketers are sating the needs and interests of both parents and kids. The report also analyzes the following:
  • Household usage analysis of 21 different types of foods and beverages that play significant role in family household eating habits. Analysis extends to household usage by volume/amount of 16 food and beverage types, with volume share attributable to children.
  • Forecasts for the adult and child population, as well as child population by age, racial/ethnic demographics, and household income; children’s influence on grocery spending; and impact of childhood obesity on product innovation and marketing.
  • Consumer attitudes toward factors influence the purchase of kids’ food and beverage, focusing on healthfulness, enjoyment/product attribute, and packaging/price.
  • Consumer attitudes toward diet and eating habits—performed in part by asking adults to rank both themselves and their children’s habits.
  • Parents’ attitudes related to food, advertising and shopping with their children, including attitudes relating to cooking enjoyment and food healthfulness; attitudes about advertising; and attitudes toward shopping with their kids, and influence of kids on purchasing decisions.
  • How parents and kids learn about new kids’ food products, including parent sources for product innovation, in-store marketing tactics, traditional media, and social media marketing; the influence of kids’ requests and friend recommendations; where kids learn about new food products; and parental attitudes toward getting kids to try new foods and implications for the kids’ food and beverage market.
Chapter 1: Executive Summary
Report Scope
Report summary
Market trends & opportunities
Market factors
Children influence weekly grocery spending
Children obesity trends
Factors influencing kids’ food purchases
Parents’ attitudes towards kids’ eating habits
Ranking diet healthfulness
Market size
Usage among households without children and with children
Kid-centric products hit their mark
Households with children: kids’ food & beverage volume share
Household volume share by presence of children, by food & beverage type
Children’s volume share of food & beverage types by household type
Usage, marketing and new product trends: breakfast foods
Usage trends
Trends over time
Marketing and new product trends
Usage, marketing and new product trends: lunch foods
Prepared lunch kit usage
Trends over time
Marketing and new product trends
Usage, marketing and new product trends: dinner foods
Trends over time
Marketing and new product trends
Usage, marketing and new product trends: sweet snacks
Trends over time
Marketing and new product trends
Usage, marketing and new product trends: salty snacks
Salty snack usage trends
Trends over time
Marketing and new product trends
Usage, marketing and new product trends: produce
Fruit and vegetable usage trends
Trends over time
Marketing and new product trends
Usage, marketing and new product trends: beverages
Beverage usage trends
Trends over time
Marketing and new product trends
Parents’ attitudes toward food, advertising and shopping with kids
Parents’ attitudes toward food
Parents’ attitudes toward advertising
Parents’ attitudes toward shopping with kids
How parents learn about new kids’ food products
Where parents learn about kids’ food products
Where their kids hear about new products
Getting kids to try new foods
Chapter 2: Market Trends & Opportunities
Market factors
Baby bounce projections are beneficial to market
Table 2-1: U.S. Population: Adults vs. Children, 2015-2025
Despite dip in population of older kids, this demographic wields purchasing power
Table 2-2: U.S. Population: Children, by Age, 2015-2025
The generational influence of the Millennial parent
Table 2-3: U.S. Millennial Generation Households with Children: Percentage and Share by HH Income, 2015
Multicultural child population continues to grow
Table 2-4: U.S. Households with Children, by Race/Ethnicity and HH Income, 2015
Table 2-5: U.S. Population: Children, by Race/Ethnicity, 2015-2025
The impact of household income
Table 2-6: U.S. Households, by Presence of Children and HH Income, 2015
Larger families tend to earn less
Table 2-7: U.S. Households with Children, by Number of Children and HH Income, 2015
Children influence weekly grocery spending
Table 2-8: Weekly Household Grocery Expenditures, by Presence of Children and Number of Children, 2015
Children obesity trends
Chart 2-1: Childhood Obesity Rates by Age, 1988-2012
Attributes important to purchasing foods for kids
Factors influencing kids’ food purchases
Chart 2-2: Factors Influencing Kids’ Food Purchases, 2016
Health-related factors
Table 2-9: Health-Related Factors Influencing Kids’ Food Purchases, 2016
Enjoyment and product attribute factors
Table 2-10: Enjoyment and Product Attribute Factors Influencing Kids’ Food Purchases, 2016
Packaging and price factors
Table 2-11: Packaging and Price Factors Influencing Kids’ Food Purchases, 2016
Attitudes towards diet and eating habits
Parents’ attitudes towards kids’ eating habits
Graph 2-3: Parents’ Attitudes toward Children’s Eating Habits, 2016
Demographic influence
Table 2-12: Parents’ Attitudes toward Children’s Eating Habits, by Demographic, 2016
Ranking diet healthfulness
Parents vs. Non-parents
Chart 2-4: Ranking Diet Healthfulness: Parents vs. Adults without Children, 2016
Parents vs. kids
Chart 2-5: Ranking Diet Healthfulness: Parents’ Diets and Children’s Diets, 2016
Table 2-13: Ranking Children’s Diet Healthfulness, by Parental Diet Ranking, 2016
Chapter 3: Market Size
Usage among households without children and with children
Table 3-1: Household Food and Beverage Use, by Type and Presence of Children, 2016
Kid-centric products hit their mark
Table 3-1: Household Food and Beverage Use, by Type and Presence of Children, 2016
Households with children: kids’ food & beverage volume share
Table 3-2: Households with Kids: Foods Eaten in HH and Share Eaten by Kids, by Food Type, 2016
Household volume share by presence of children, by food & beverage type
Table 3-3: Households with Kids: Foods Eaten in HH and Share Eaten by Kids, by Food Type, 2016
Children’s volume share of food & beverage types by household type
Table 3-4: Children’s Share of Food and Beverages: All Households and Households with Children, 2016
Chapter 4: Usage, Marketing and New Product Trends: Breakfast Foods
Usage trends
Breakfast food usage
Table 4-1: Breakfast Food Usage, by Type, by Presence of Children in Household, 2015
Larger households are more likely to use breakfast pastries
Table 4-2: Breakfast Food Usage, by Type: Households with Kids, Number of Kids in Household, 2015
Families with older kids are more likely to use hot breakfast and toaster pastries
Table 4-3: Breakfast Food Usage, by Type: Households with Kids, Age of Kids in Household, 2015
Affluent families over index in use of energy/diet snack bars
Table 4-4: Breakfast Food Usage, by Type: Households with Kids, by Household Income, 2015
Trends over time
Graph 4-1: Hot Cereal, Cold Cereal, and Frozen Breakfast Entrees/Sandwiches Usage: Households with
Children, 2006-2015
Graph 4-2: Breakfast Snack Bar, Energy/Diet Snack Bar, Toaster Pastry and Breakfast Pastry Usage:
Households with Children, 2006-2015
Marketing and new product trends
Better-for-you breakfast
Making breakfast fun to eat
Hot breakfast
Chapter 5: Usage, Marketing and New Product Trends: Lunch Foods
Usage trends
Table 5-1: Prepared Lunch Kit Usage, by Presence of Children in Household, 2015
Lunchables lead the way
Table 5-2: Prepared Lunch Kit Usage, by Brand: Households with Kids, Number of Kids in Household, 2015
Lunchables’ sweet spot is kids aged 6-11
Table 5-3: Prepared Lunch Kit Usage, by Brand: Households with Kids, Age of Kids in Household, 2015
Prepared lunch kit usage skews less affluent
Table 5-4: Prepared Lunch Kit Usage, by Brand: Households with Kids, by Household Income, 2015
Trends over time
Graph 5-1: Prepared Lunch Kit Usage: Households with Children, 2006-2015
Marketing and new product trends
Healthier snack/lunch kits
Chapter 6: Usage, Marketing and New Product Trends: Dinner Foods
Usage trends
Table 6-1: Frozen Food Usage, by Type, by Presence of Children in Household, 2015
Use of frozen hot snacks and main courses skews toward households with teens
Table 6-2: Frozen Food Usage, by Type: Households with Kids, Age of Kids in Household, 2015
Trends over time
Graph 6-1: Frozen Pizza, Frozen Main Courses and Frozen Hot Snacks Usage: Households with
Children, 2006-2015
Marketing and new product trends
Health and variety provide innovative inspiration
Chapter 7: Usage, Marketing and New Product Trends: Sweet Snacks
Usage trends
Table 7-1: Sweet Snack Usage, by Type, by Presence of Children in Household, 2015
Use of snack cakes and fruit snacks are strongest less affluent families
Table 7-2: Sweet Snack Usage, by Type: Households with Kids, by Household Income, 2015
Trends over time
Graph 7-1: Sweet Snacks Usage, by Type: Households with Children, 2006-2015
Marketing and new product trends
The fun factor helps differentiate kids treats from mainstream offerings Healthier sweet snacks
Chapter 8: Usage, Marketing and New Product Trends: Salty Snacks
Usage trends
Table 8-1: Salty Snack Usage, by Type, by Presence of Children in Household, 2015
Trends over time
Graph 8-1: Salty Snacks Usage, by Type: Households with Children, 2006-2015
Marketing and new product trends
Health appeals to parents; fun appeals to kids
Chapter 9: Usage, Marketing and New Product Trends: Produce
Usage trends
Fruit and vegetable usage
Table 9-1: Canned/Jarred Fruit, Canned/Jarred Vegetables and Fresh Produce Usage, by Presence of
Children in Household, 2015
Larger families skew heavily toward use of non-fresh produce
Table 9-2: Canned/Jarred Fruit, Canned/Jarred Vegetables and Fresh Produce Usage: Households with
Kids, by Number of Children in Household, 2015
Trends over time
Graph 9-1: Canned/Jarred Fruit, Canned/Jarred Vegetables and Fresh Produce Usage: Households with
Children, 2006-2015
Marketing and new product trends
Lunchbox friendly
Upping the health ante
Chapter 10: Usage, Marketing and New Product Trends: Beverages
Usage trends
Beverage usage
Table 10-1: Beverage Usage, by Type: by Presence of Children in Household, 2015
Larger households skew highest in use of milk flavorings and powdered soft drinks
Table 10-2: Beverage Usage, by Type: Households with Kids, by Number of Kids, 2015
Families with older kids more likely to use beverage enhancers
Table 10-3: Beverage Usage, by Type: Households with Kids, by Age of Kids, 2015
Trends over time
Graph 10-1: Beverage Usage, by Type: Households with Children, 2006-2015
Marketing and new product trends
Beverage innovation taps health halo
Chapter 11: Parents’ Attitudes Toward Food, Advertising and Shopping with
Kids
Parents’ attitudes toward food
Older parents buy local; young parents seek out nutritional products
Table 11-1: Parents’ Attitudes about Food, by Age of Parent, 2015
Asians seek out “healthy” food
Table 11-2: Parents’ Attitudes about Food, by Race/Ethnicity of Parent, 2015
Single adult households are more likely to seek out organic/natural and health food
Table 11-3: Parents’ Attitudes about Food: One-Adult vs. Married Households, 2015
Parents’ attitudes toward advertising
Parents are receptive to advertising to learn about new products
Table 11-4: Parents’ Attitudes about Advertising to Kids, by Number of Kids in Household, 2015
It’s okay to market to older kids
Table 11-5: Parents’ Attitudes about Advertising to Kids, by Age of Kids in Household, 2015
Advertising helps black parents learn about products and choose what to buy for their kids
Table 11-6: Parents’ Attitudes about Advertising to Kids, by Race/Ethnicity of Parent, 2015
Parents’ attitudes toward shopping with kids
Parents don’t like kids pestering, yet it influences decisions
Table 11-7: Parents’ Attitudes about Shopping with Kids, by Age of Parent, 2015
Parents don’t like kids pestering, yet it influences decisions
Table 11-8: Parents’ Attitudes about Shopping with Kids, by Number of Kids in Household, 2015
Chapter 12: How Parents Learn About New Kids’ Food Products
Learning about new kids’ food products
Where parents learn about kids’ food products
Chart 12-1: Where Parents Learn About New Kids’ Food Products, 2016
More affluent households influenced by in-store promotional tactics
Table 12-1: Where Parents Learn About New Kids’ Food Products, by HH Income, 2016
In-store sampling educates Millennials on new kids’ food products
Table 12-2: Where Parents Learn About New Kids’ Food Products, by Generation, 2016
Parents with older kids learn more about new products through them
Table 12-3: Where Parents Learn About New Kids’ Food Products, by Age of Children, 2016
Where their kids hear about new products
Chart 12-2: How Children Learn About New Food Products, 2016
Getting kids to try new foods
Trial without risk is key
Chart 12-3: Ways to Introduce New Food Products to Children, 2016
More affluent parents would like restaurants that support new food trial
Table 12-4: Ways to Introduce New Food Products to Children, by HH Income, 2016
Appendix
Methodology
Consumer survey methodology
Report table interpretation
Color coding
Indexing

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