The U.S. Market for Hair Care Products

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Published Jun 1, 2001 | 294 Pages | Pub ID: LA278691

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Hair care is a hot but complex market that is presently worth over $6 billion and is projected to grow to $7 billion by 2005. Americans are more style-conscious than ever before; greying baby boomers -- of both sexes -- are trying a range of hair care products to help them look and feel younger. Generations X and Y are even more adventurous than their parents, as they condition, mousse, bleach and perm at will. A savvy marketer can make a splash, if he chooses the right stance for his products. This new Packaged Facts report offers executives in-depth analyses of the action in shampoos, conditioners, styling products, hair colorings, accessories, home permanent/relaxer kits, and hair growth products. Sales trends are examined, as well as brand shares. Also covered are the competitive strategies of Alberto-Culver, Clairol, L'Oreal, Procter & Gamble, Revlon, Unilever, and others. A wealth of Simmons demographic data are also presented and discussed.

  1. Executive Summary
    Scope and Methodology
    • Market Definition
    • Methodology

    The Products
    • Seven Main Categories.
    • Product Descriptions

    The Market
    • Hair Care Sales Push to $6.2 Billion in 2000
    • Market to Be Worth $7.5 Billion in 2005
    • Table 1-1: U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, 1996-2005 (dollars)
    • A Market Propelled by New Sense of Style, Graying Boomers, and Men's Use
    • The Illusion of a Mature Hair Care Market
    • A More Sophisticated Sense of Appearance
    • Shampoo Accounts for One-Third of Sales
    • Figure 1-1: Share of U.S. Retail Sales of Hair Care Products, by Category, 2000 (percent): 7 categories, 2 segments

    The Marketers
    • About 50 Significant Marketers of Mass-Market Products
    • The Competitive Situation: A Hard Fight against Commodity Image
    • P&G and Unilever Jockey for Overall Hair Care Lead
    • Premium Image Trend May Return Market to a Commodity State
    • Figure 1-2: Leading Marketers Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, 2000 (percent): 7 marketers
    • The Majors Focus on Ethnic Hair Care Arena
    • Regimen Lines Yield Price-Points, Some Brand Loyalty
    • More Positioning on Technology
    • Hair Care Ad Spending Is Colossal, Despite Slip to $684 Million in 2000
    • Consumer Advertising Positioning: Beautiful Hair

    Distribution and Retail
    • Mass Merchandisers Take Bigger Slice of Hair Care
    • A Surprising Range of Margins

    The Consumer
    • Shampoo the Most Widely Used Hair Care Product
    • Table 1-2: Adult Users of Hair Care Products, by Product Type, 2000 (number): 7 product types
    • Gender Factor in Use of Most Hair Care Products
  2. The Products
    Introduction
    • Market Definition
    • Clarification of Terms
    • Clarification of Price-Tiers

    The Products
    • Seven Main Categories
    • Similar Products, Separate Positionings
    • Shampoos
    • Styling Products.
    • Hair Spray/Spritz.
    • Hairdressings.
    • Conditioners.
    • Hair Accessories
    • Hair Coloring
    • Home Permanent/Relaxer Kits
    • Hair Growth Products
    • Some Hybrid Products
    • Natural and Quasi-Natural Hair Care
    • Packaging: Mostly Plastic, But Metal and Glass, Too
  3. The Market
    • Figure 3-1: U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, 1996-2000

    Market Size and Growth
    • Method of Calculating Sales Figures.
    • Hair Care Sales Push to $6.2 Billion in 2000
    • A Market Propelled by New Sense of Style, Graying Boomers, and Men's Use
    • Shampoo Breaks Stride at $2 Billion Level.
    • Styling Products Meander to $1.3 Billion
    • Conditioners in Brisk Climb to $1.2 Billion
    • Accessories Build Momentum, Approach $1.0 Billion
    • Hair Color Bullish at $416 Million
    • Home Perms/Relaxers, in Slower Slide, Register $123 Million
    • Hair Growth, Also at $123 Million, Is Stunted
    • Interesting Breakouts for the Styling Products Category
    • Table 3-1: U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, by Category, 1996-2000 (dollars): 7 categories.
    • Table 3-2: U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Styling Products, by Segment, 1996-2000 (dollars): hair spray/spritz, hair dressings

    Factors in Future Growth
    • The Illusion of a Mature Hair Care Market
    • A More Sophisticated Sense of Appearance
    • .But Fashion Is Fickle
    • Graying Boomers Experiment with Their Hairstyles
    • Kids Style-Conscious at Earlier Age
    • Table 3-3: Projection of U.S. Population by Age Group, 2000-2010 (number): 6 age groups
    • Men Now Likelier to Use Hair Care Products
    • A Growing Ethnic Market
    • Table 3-4: Projection of U.S. Population by Race and by Hispanic Origin, 2000-2010 (number): African American, Hispanic origin, Asian American.
    • New Product Development Stresses Regimens and Prestige Image
    • The National Economy

    Outlook by Category
    • Shampoo
    • Styling Products.
    • Conditioners.
    • Accessories
    • Hair Coloring Products
    • Home Permanent/Relaxer Kits
    • Hair Growth Products
    • Figure 3-2: Projected U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, 1996-2000

    Projected Sales
    • Hair Care to Be Worth $7.5 Billion in 2005
    • Expect Shampoo to Push Steadily Toward $2.4 Billion
    • Styling Products in Steady Groove to $1.6 Billion
    • Conditioners to Climb Briskly to $1.5 Billion
    • Accessories Sales Predicted to Near $1.2 Billion
    • Hair Color in Strong Ascent to $552 Million
    • Home Perm/Relaxer Kits to Rally Slowly to $131 Million
    • Hair Growth to Struggle to $127 Million
    • Table 3-5: Projected U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, by Category, 2000-2005 (dollars): 7 categories
    • In Styling Products Category, Dressings to Eclipse Sprays
    • Table 3-6: Projected U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Styling Products, by Segment, 2000-2005 (dollars): hair spray/spritz, hair dressings

    Market Composition: By Product
    • Shampoo Accounts for One-Third of Sales
    • Table 3-7: Share of U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, by Category, 1996-2000 (percent): 7 categories, 2 segments
    • Dressings Gain in Share of Styling Dollars
    • Table 3-8: Share of U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Styling Products, by Segment, 1996-2000 (percent): hair spray/spritz, hair dressings

    Market Composition: By Outlet
    • Mass Merchandisers Take Bigger Slice of Hair Care
    • Table 3-9: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Sales of Hair Care Products, by Channel, 1996-2000 (percent): mass merchandisers, supermarkets, drugstores

    Market Composition: Regionality
    • Special Note Regarding Simmons Regionality Data
    • Shampoo Use Has Largest Base in South
    • Table 3-10: U.S. Adult Use of Shampoo, by Region, 2000 (number, percent, index): Northeast, Midwest, South, West
    • Styling Products: Spritz, Cream, Lotion/Liquid/Tonic Show Regional Skews.
    • Table 3-11: U.S. Adult Use of Hair Styling Products, by Region, 2000 (number, percent, index): 6 product types, 4 regions
    • Conditioner Users Have Largest Base in South.
    • Table 3-12: U.S. Adult Use of Hair Conditioners/Creme Rinses, by Region, 2000 (number, percent, index): Northeast, Midwest, South, West
    • Hair Color Users Most Numerous in South.
    • Table 3-13: U.S. Adult Use of Hair Color Products, by Region, 2000 (number, percent, index): Northeast, Midwest, South, West
    • Home Perms/Relaxers a Hit in South—Other Regions Resist
    • Table 3-14: U.S. Adult Use of Home Permanent/Relaxer Kits, by Region, 2000 (number, percent, index): Northeast, Midwest, South, West
    • Southerners the Most Receptive to Hair Growth Products
    • Table 3-15: U.S. Adult Use of Hair Growth Products, by Region, 2000 (number, percent, index): Northeast, Midwest, South, West
  4. The Marketers
    The Marketers
    • About 50 Significant Marketers
    • Many HBA Specialists
    • Involvement by Drug Companies
    • Both Public and Private Companies
    • Some Degree of Consolidation
    • Table of Brands and Involvements
    • Table 4-1: Leading Hair Care Product Marketers and Their Representative Brands, 2001

    Marketer Shares
    • P&G and Unilever Jockey for Overall Hair Care Lead
    • Table 4-2: Leading Marketers Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products, by Category, 2000 (percent): 7 categories, 7 marketers
    • Procter & Gamble Rules Shampoo Category
    • Table 4-3: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Shampoo, by Brand, 1999-2000 (17 marketers; 26 brands; 29 extensions; private label)
    • Unilever Is Dressings Leader.
    • Table 4-4: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Dressings, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 18 marketers; 36 brands; 17 extensions; private label
    • Unilever Also Leads in Sprays/Spritzes
    • Table 4-5: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Spray, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 14 marketers; 26 brands; 16 extensions
    • Unilever's Command of Conditioners Challenged by P&G
    • Table 4-6: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Conditioner/Creme Rinse, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 18 marketers; 30 brands; 14 extensions; private label
    • L & N and Newell Rubbermaid/Goody on Top of Accessories Heap
    • Table 4-7: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Accessories, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 8 marketers; 11 brands; 17 extensions; private label
    • L'Oreal Outruns Bristol-Myers for Hair Color Crown
    • Table 4-8: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Color, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 4 marketers; 7 brands; 31 extensions
    • L'Oreal, with Carson Added, Now Rules Relaxers
    • Table 4-9: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Home Relaxer Kits, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 12 marketers; 18 brands; 17 extensions
    • Playtex Controls Two-Thirds of Home Perm Dollars
    • Table 4-10: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Home Permanent Kits, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 7 marketers; 7 brands; 9 extensions
    • Upjohn Retains Control of Hair Growth Products Category
    • Table 4-11: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Growth Products, by Brand, 1999-2000 (percent): 2 marketers; 2 brands; private label

    The Competitive Situation
    • A Hard Fight Against Commodity Image
    • Upscale Niches Attracting More Players
    • Premium Image Trend May Return Market to a Commodity State.
    • Retail Trends Pressure Majors, But Help Some Minors
    • The Majors Focus on Ethnic Hair Care Arena.
    • Stakes Raised in the Natural Foods Channel

    Competitive Profile: Alberto-Culver Company
    • Net Sales of Over $2.2 Billion in 2000
    • Alberto-Culver's Two Business Segments
    • The Core Alberto-Culver and St. Ives Brand Franchises
    • Pro-Line Raises Alberto-Culver's Ethnic Profile
    • Alberto-Culver's Brands Outside of Hair Care

    Competitive Profile: Bristol-Myers Squibb Company
    • Net Sales Break $18.2 Billion in 2000
    • Clairol, Inc. Is on the Block
    • Why Sell a Blue Chip Brand?
    • Clairol Still Releasing New Products
    • Ethical Pharmaceuticals Are Most Important
    • Other Bristol-Myers Product

    Competitive Profile: L'Oreal Group
    • Sales of $11.9 Billion in 2000
    • Hair Care Included within Cosmetics Sector
    • A Global Marketer with 500 Brands
    • L'Oreal's Stance Ideal for U.S. Hair Care
    • L'Oreal Targets a Range of Age Brackets
    • .And Also Men.
    • L'Oreal Mines Ethnic Hair Care Potential.
    • Other L'Oreal Brands

    Competitive Profile: The Procter & Gamble Co.
    • Net Sales of $40 Billion in Fiscal 2000
    • P&G's Five Business Segments
    • A Packaged Goods Giant with Major Hair Care Brands
    • Premium Strategies for Pantene, Physique, Vidal Sassoon
    • Some of P&G's Other Household Names

    Competitive Profile: Revlon, Inc
    • Net Sales at $1.5 Billion
    • Revlon's Overall Marketing Strategy Hampered by Debt.
    • Revlon Banks on a New Premium Hair Care Line
    • Sale of African Pride to Colomer
    • Other Revlon Brands

    Competitive Profile: Unilever
    • Turnover Edges Up to $44 Billion in 2000
    • Unilever's Four Business Segments
    • Unilever Is Also the Other Diversified Giant
    • Unilever Champions the Low End.
    • Other Unilever Marques

    Marketing Trends
    • Marketers Install Solid Niches in Commodity Business
    • Regimen Lines Yield Price-Points, Some Brand Loyalty
    • More Positioning on Technology
    • Melding Prestige and Mass

    Product Trends
    • Regimen Lines and Collections
    • Higher-End Hair Care Products.
    • Natural and Seminatural Products
    • Milder Products
    • Table 4-12: Selected New Product Introductions, 1999-2001 (listing): 27 marketers, 39 brands

    Consumer Advertising Expenditures
    • Hair Care Ad Spending Is Colossal, Despite Slip to $684 Million in 2000
    • Seventeen $1 Million-Plus Spenders in 2000
    • P&G Leads Pack with $154 Million Expenditure
    • L'Oreal and Bristol-Myers Nearly Tied, Spending $138 Million and $135 Million
    • Unilever Cuts Buys to $79 Million
    • Alberto-Culver Doubles Spending to $51 Million
    • J & J Brakes to $49 Million
    • Upjohn Doubles Rogaine Ad Budget to $42 Million
    • Four Marketers Expended Between $4 Million and $7 Million
    • Five Others Spent More Than $1 Million
    • "All Other" Marketers Spend $3.5 Million

    Consumer Advertising Positioning
    • Beautiful Hair
    • Healthy Hair
    • Volume
    • Cutting Edge Styles for Everyone
    • Antidandruff/Anti-Itch Properties
    • African American Beauty
    • Graying Gracefully
    • Hair Color for Men: Quick, Discreet, and Macho
    • Hair Growth Tactics: Men's versus Women's Products.
    • Celebrity Endorsements.

    Consumer Promotions
    • Coupons and More Coupons
    • A Contest for Graying Men
    • Table 4-13: Share of Hair Care Retail Dollar Sales Transacted with Marketer-Issued Coupons, by Product Type, 1998 (percent): 14 product types
    • Copromotions with Charities
    • Interactivity
  5. Distribution And Retail
    Distribution
    • The Traditional versus Direct-Ship Paths
    • Opting for Distribution Services—Or Not
    • Mail Order

    At the Retail Level
    • A Surprising Range of Margins
    • Table 5-1: Retailers' Average Gross Profit Margins on Hair Care Products, by Product Type, 1999 (percent): 9 product types
    • Assortments Are Vast
    • A High Share of Purchases Made on Deal
    • Table 5-2: Share of Hair Care Supermarket Dollar Sales Transacted on Deal, by Product Type, 1999 (percent): 14 product types.
    • Regimen Shelvings: Pros and Cons
    • Frequent Buyer Clubs Aid Some Hair Care Brands
    • Advice to Mass Retailers

    At the Retail Level: By Channel
    • Overview
    • Strong Multicategory Growth at Mass Merchandisers
    • Table 5-3: Change in U.S. Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products in Mass Merchandiser Outlets, by Category and Segment, 1999-2000 (percent): 7 categories, 2 segments
    • Supermarkets Profit from Dressings and Color
    • Table 5-4: Changes in U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products in the Supermarket Channel, by Category and Segment, 1999-2000 (percent): 7 categories, 2 segments
    • Drugstores Make Stronger Stand in 2000
    • Table 5-5: Gains in U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Hair Care Products in the Drugstore Channel, by Category and Segment, 1999-2000 (percent): 7 categories, 2 segments
  6. The Consumer
    Data Overview
    • Explanatory Note on SMRB Data

    The Consumer: Shampoos
    • Over 179 Million Adult Shampoo Users
    • Shampoos for "Normal" Hair Are Most Popular Type
    • Interesting Gender Patterns in Use of Shampoo by Type
    • Moderate Cross-Usage of Shampoo Types
    • Table 6-1: U.S. Adult Use of Various Shampoo Types, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): 11 shampoo types
    • Heavy Shampoo Use Is Most Typical of Americans
    • Table 6-2: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Shampoo in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, moderate, heavy
    • Heavy Shampooers Account for Almost Two-Thirds of Usage
    • Figure 6-1: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Adult Shampoo Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • No Stand-Out Factors in Overall Use of Shampoo
    • But Heavy Shampoo Use Marked by Several Factors.
    • Table 6-3: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Shampoo, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors.

    The Consumer: Styling Products
    • Reminder: Styling Products Are Sprays/Spritzes and Dressings
    • Over 84 Million Hair Spray Users
    • Unscented, Super Hold Are Most Popular Hair Spray Types
    • Table 6-4: U Adult Use of Various Hair Spray/Spritz Product Types, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): four levels of hold; spritz; unscented, scented
    • Aerosols Are Most Popular Hair Spray Packaging
    • Table 6-5: US. Adult Use of Hair Spray/Spritz Packagings, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): aerosol spray, pump spray
    • Moderate Frequency Dominates Hair Spray Use
    • Table 6-6: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hair Spray in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, moderate, heavy
    • Moderate Users of Hair Spray Account for Three-Quarters of Usage
    • Figure 6-2: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Adult Hair Spray Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Older Skew for Any Hair Spray Use
    • Younger Skew for Heavy Hair Spray Use
    • Table 6-7: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hair Spray, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors.
    • Light Frequency of Spritz Use Is Dominant
    • Table 6-8: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Spritz in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, moderate, heavy
    • Moderate Users Account for Half of Spritz Usage
    • Figure 6-3: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Hairstyling Spritz Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Use of Spritz Shaped by Youth, African Americans, Southerners
    • Heavy Spritzing Practiced by African Americans, Southerners, and the Affluent
    • Table 6-9: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Spritz, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors
    • Dressings Used by 73 Million
    • Gels and Mousses Are Most Widely Used Dressings
    • Table 6-10: U.S. Adult Use of Various Types of Hair Dressing, by Gender, 2000 (nmber and percent): gel, mousse, lotion/liquid, cream, tonic
    • Moderate Frequency of Gel Use Rivaled by Light Use
    • Table 6-11: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Gel in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light moderate, heavy
    • Moderate Frequency of Gel Use Accounts for Majority of Usage
    • Figure 6-4: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Hairstyling Gel Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Use of Gel Skews Young and Affluent
    • Gender Not a Factor in Heavy Use of Gel.
    • Table 6-12: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Gel, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors
    • Mousse Use Tends to Be Light
    • Table 6-13: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Mousse in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, moderate, heavy
    • Moderate Users Account for Biggest Portion of Usage
    • Figure 6-5: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Hairstyling Mousse Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Mousse Users Present a Feminine/Family Profile
    • In Heavy Mousse Use, Midwesterners and Westerners Are Key
    • Table 6-14: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Mousse, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors
    • Light Use of Lotions/Liquids/Tonics Is Prevalent.
    • Table 6-15: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Lotion/Liquid/Tonic in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, moderate, heavy
    • Moderate Use of Lotions/Liquids/Tonics Accounts for Half of Usage
    • Figure 6-6: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Hairstyling Lotion/Liquid/Tonic Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Lotion/Liquid/Tonic Use Characterized by Youth and Low Income
    • Few Key Factors in Heavy Use of Lotions/Liquids/Tonics
    • Table 6-16: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Liquid/Lotion/Tonic, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors
    • Light Use of Styling Creams Is Most Popular
    • Table 6-17: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Cream in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, moderate, heavy
    • Moderate Users of Creams Account for Over Half of Usage
    • Figure 6-7: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Styling Cream Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Midwestern Residency Featured in Hair Cream Use
    • In Heavy Use of Creams, Men Are the Sole Sure Factor
    • Table 6-18: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hairstyling Cream, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors

    The Consumer: Hair Conditioners/Creme Rinses
    • Almost 97 Million Adults Use Conditioners
    • Regular Conditioner Is Most Popular Product Type
    • Table 6-19: U.S. Adult Use of Various Hair Conditioner/Creme Rinse Types, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): 12 product types
    • Moderate Frequency of Conditioner Use Prevails.
    • Table 6-20: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hair Conditioner/Crème Rinse in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, moderate, heavy
    • Moderate Users of Conditioner Also Dominate Usage
    • Figure 6-8: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Adult Hair Conditioner/Crème Rinse Usage in Last Seven Days, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Young Women Likely Users of Conditioners
    • Heavy Use of Conditioners: Presents Broader Age Bracket.
    • Table 6-21: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hair Conditioners/Creme Rinse, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors

    The Consumer: Hair Coloring
    • Almost 36 Million Adults Color Their Hair
    • Permanent Color Is Most Popular Product Type
    • Table 6-22: U.S. Adult Use of Various Hair Coloring Product Types, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): 6 product types
    • Heavy Use of Hair Coloring Is the Norm—Because of Women.
    • Table 6-23: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Hair Coloring Products in Last Seven Days, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, heavy
    • Heavy Users of Hair Color Account for the Great Majority of Usage
    • Figure 6-9: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Adult Hair Coloring Product Usage in Last Year, According to Frequency, 2000
    • Hair Color Use Peaks among Women and the Middle-Aged
    • Heavy Hair Color Use Quite Similar to Overall Use.
    • Table 6-24: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hair Coloring Products, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors

    The Consumer: Home Permanent/Relaxer Kits
    • More than 14 Million Use Home Perms or Relaxer Kits
    • Regular Home Perms Have Largest Audience
    • Table 6-25: U.S. Adult Use of Various Home Permanent/Hair Relaxer Kits, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): 8 product types.
    • Heavy Use Barely Edges Out Light.
    • Table 6-26: Frequency of U.S. Adult Use of Home Permanent/ Hair Relaxer Kits in Last Year, by Gender, 2000 (number and percent): light, heavy
    • Home Perm Heavy Users Responsible for Three-Quarters of Usage
    • Figure 6-10: Volumetrics: Share of U.S. Adult Home Permanent/Hair Relaxer Kit Usage in Last Year, According to Frequency, 2000
    • All Use of Home Perms Shaped by Women, Middle-Agers, Southerners
    • Heavy Home Perm Use Also Influenced by Youth
    • Table 6-27: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Home Permanent/Hair Relaxer Kits, All versus Heavy Users, 2000 (listing): 13 factors

    The Consumer: Hair Growth Products
    • Over 4.6 Million Use Preps to Foster Hair Growth
    • Use of Hair Growth Products for Six Months Is Marked by Middle Age, Professional Occupation
    • Table 6-28: Demographic Factors Favoring U.S. Adult Use of Hair Growth Products for at Least Six Months, 2000 (listing): 13 factors

    Appendix I: Examples Of Consumer And Trade Advertising And Promotions
    Appendix II: Addresses Of Selected Marketers