U.S. Market for Fruit Products

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Published Aug 1, 2004 | 244 Pages | Pub ID: LA959570

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The U.S. Fruit Products Market: Translating Health Awareness into Sales
Can fruit products capitalize on the growing concern about the overweight but poorly nourished American, particularly the American youngster? This Packaged Facts report examines the trends and products in the U.S. market for fruit juices and drinks, packaged fruit, and fruit confectionery. Worth $16 billion at the mass-market level, the market spans 11 major categories and segments: refrigerated juices/drinks, shelf-stable bottled juices, aseptic juices, shelf-stable canned juices, frozen juices, fruit drink mixes, canned/bottled fruit, shelf-stable jam/jelly/preserves, dry fruit snacks, dried fruit, and frozen fruit. Standout segments (ranging from smoothies and dry fruit snacks to old standbys such as grape juice, lemonade, and tomato/vegetable juice cocktail) are quantified through IRI sales data, Productscan new product reports, and Simmons consumer surveys, along with a thorough examination of key market drivers, from bite-size and portable snacks to fortification and exotic flavors.

Report Methodology
The information in The U.S. Fruit Products Market is based on both primary and secondary research. Primary research involved on-site examination of the retail milieu, interviews with marketing, public relations and industry analysts within the food market and consultants to the industry. Secondary research entailed data-gathering from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature. Packaged Facts has derived mass merchandiser sales figures from Information Resources, Inc. (IRI) InfoScan sales-tracking data. Figures provided on national consumer advertising expenditures are based primarily on data (copyright 2003) compiled by CMR/TNS Media Intelligence U.S., the leading provider of strategic advertising and marketing communications intelligence. The analysis of consumer demographics derives from Simmons Market Research Bureau survey data for fall 2003. New product information is gathered via literature research, personal interviews and data compiled by ProductScan, a service of Marketing Intelligence Service Ltd.

The report looks at every segment of the fruit products market, examining trends for growth and projecting sales of fruit products through 2008. It analyzes consumer demographics and their current and projected impact on sales of fruit products. It provides up-to-date competitive profiles of marketers of fruit products - including a look at smaller, up-and-coming companies - and discusses the influence of demographic trends as a driver of retail trends. The report also spotlights new products and current distribution trends, and offers readers trends and marketing opportunities within the food industry.

What You’ll Get in this Report
The U.S. Market for Fruit Products makes important predictions and recommendations regarding the future of this market, and pinpoints ways current and prospective marketers can capitalize on current trends and spearhead new ones. No other market research report provides both the comprehensive analysis and extensive data that The U.S. Market for Fruit Products offers. The report addresses the following segments:

  • The Market (including market size and composition, and projected market growth)
  • The Marketers (including discussions of specific marketer brand and market shares)
  • Competitive Profiles (of the mainstream food marketers, specialists and up-and-coming niche players, and analyses of the products they market)
  • Attitudes and Behaviors (of both adults and children as consumers)
  • The Products
  • Trends and Opportunities

Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

Scroll down to see a more detailed outline of the contents of this report.

How You Will Benefit from this Report
If your company is already competing in the fruit products market, or is considering making the leap, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current market for fruit products, as well as projected sales and trends through 2008. Contributing to that understanding will be a complete analysis of sales data from IRI and other published and trade sources, a detailed discussion of the snack consumer based on Simmons data.

This report will help:

  • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for fruit products.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for fruit products.
  • Advertising agencies working with clients in the food industry understand the product buyer to develop messages and images that compel consumers to purchase these products.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librariansprovide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.

Chapter 1: Executive Summary
  • Scope and Methodology
    • Scope of Report
    • Report Methodology

  • Fruit and the American Diet
    • Fruit and Overweight/Obesity: A Healthy Correlation
    • Recent Fruit Consumption Falls
    • Hispanics as Prime Consumers
    • Promoting the Power of Fruit
    • Health Claims for Nutrients Can Boost Fruit Consumption

  • The Market

    • Retail Sales Just Under $23 Billion
    • Fruit Juice Sales Decline in 2003, Fruit Confectionary Posts Healthy Gain
    • Mass-Market Retail Sales Snapshot
    • Supermarkets Still on Top
    • Figure 1-1: Share of U.S. Fruit Product Sales by Retail Channel (percent)
    • Pockets of Growth
    • Factors to Market Growth

  • The Competitive Situation
    • Marketer Overview
    • Licensing an Important Market Component
    • The Big Get Bigger
    • PepsiCo and Coca-Cola Top the List
    • Figure 1-2: Top Marketers of Fruit Products by 2003 Share of IRI-Tracked Sales (percent)
    • The Big Get Bigger
    • Competition from Private Label

  • Marketing and New Product Trends
    • Leaders in Advertising Spending
    • Advertising Positioning
    • Number of Fruit Juice Introductions Rises Significantly
    • “Natural” and Related Package Tags Rule Introductions
    • Many Introductions Target Hispanics
    • Juice-Based Smoothies Find Favor
    • Boundary Blurs Between Fruit Juices and Functional Beverages
    • Wooing the Weight-Conscious
    • Organic Fruit Products Enter the Mainstream
    • Licensed Fruit Products Appeal to Kids
    • Convenience and Portability

  • Consumer Trends
    • 90% Penetration Rate for Jams, Jellies, and Preserves
    • Patterns by Race/Ethnicity
    • The Kid Factor

  • Looking Ahead
    • Trends and Opportunities

Chapter 2: Fruit and the American Diet

  • The Overweight American Costs and Causes
  • Higher Fruit Consumption Linked with Lower Body Mass Index Healthy-Weight People Eat Significantly More Fruit
  • Yet, Fruit Consumption Falls
  • Table 2-1: Fruit: Per Capita Consumption in Pounds, 1990-2001
  • Hispanic Consumer an Exception
  • More Exotic Fruits Gaining in Popularity
  • Table 2-2: Fruits Ranked by Per Capita Consumption in Pounds, 2001 vs. 1990
  • Produce for Better Health Foundation’s 5 A Day Program
  • Consumer Health Information for Better Nutrition Initiative
  • Rating System for Health Claims
  • Promoting the Power of Fruit
  • Strawberries: Heart Health and Lowered Cancer Risk
  • Blueberries Number One In Antioxidants
  • Grapefruit May Promote Weight Loss
  • Tomatoes and Watermelon = Lycopene
  • Cranberry May Be Added to Antibiotics
  • Health Claims for Nutrients Can Boost Fruit Consumption
  • Weight Issue Tipping Scales to Bottled Water?
  • Low-Cal, Low-Carb, Low-Sugar Juices Answer Diet Challenge
  • Protein-Fortified Juices Appeal to Dieters Soy Protein as Complement to Fruit Juices
  • Fast Food as Culprit in “Epidemic” of Overweight
  • Fast-Food Chains Enlist Fruit Products in Fight Against Fat
  • USDA Program Counters Junk Food Sold in Schools
  • Marketers Working to Improve School Fare
  • Dole Sponsors 5 A Day Program in Schools
  • High-Fructose Corn Syrup Sweetener Linked to Obesity
  • Is HFCS to Blame for Increased Caloric Intake?

Chapter 3: The Market

  • Market Size and Growth
    • Market Definition: Fruit Juice, Packaged Fruit, and Fruit Confectionary
    • Figure 3-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Fruit Products, 1999-2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Methodology for Sales Estimates
    • Retail Sales Just Under $23 Billion
    • Table 3-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Fruit Products, 1999-2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Fruit Juice Sales Decline in 2003, Fruit Confectionary Posts Healthy Gain
    • Table 3-2: U.S. Retail Sales of Fruit Juice Products, 1999-2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-3: U.S. Retail Sales of Packaged Fruit, 1999-2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-4: U.S. Retail Sales of Fruit Confectionary, 1999-2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Figure 3-2: Share of U.S. Retail Sales of Fruit Products by Category, 1999 vs. 2003 (percent)
    • Supermarkets Still Account for Almost Two-Thirds of Sales
    • Figure 3-3: Share of U.S. Fruit Product Sales by Retail Channel (percent)
    • Mass-Market Sales Slip Below $15 Billion; Fruit Confectionary Again Outperforms Market
    • Table 3-5: U.S. Mass-Market Sales of Fruit Products, 1999-2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-6: U.S. Mass-Market Sales of Fruit Juices, 1999-2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-7: U.S. Mass-Market Sales of Packaged Fruit, 1999-2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-8: U.S. Mass-Market Sales of Fruit Confectionary, 1999-2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-9: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Sales of Fruit Products by Category, 1999 vs. 2003 (percent)
    • Refrigerated Juices at 30% of Mass-Market Sales
    • Pockets of Growth
    • Table 3-10: Share of U.S. Mass-Market Sales of Fruit Products by Leading Subcategories, 1999 vs. 2003 (percent)
    • Table 3-11: Mass-Market Sales of Fruit Products by
    • Subcategory, 1999 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Smoothies Flourish Amid Declining Mass-Market Juice Sales
    • Grape Juice and Lemonade Make Juicy Gains
    • Fruit Juice Blend, Juice Drinks Post Strong Numbers
    • Aseptic Juice Drink Sales Taper Off After Rapid Climb
    • Table 3-12: U.S. Fruit Products Market: Fastest-Growing Mass-
    • Market Subcategories and Segments, 1999 vs. 2003 (in million of dollars)
    • Canned/Bottled Citrus Fruit, Frozen Fruit Stand Out in Flat Category
    • Fruit Snacks Drive Fruit Confectionary Category

  • Factors to Market Growth
    • Built-In Health Appeal
    • The Convenience Factor
    • Blurring the Boundaries Between Juice Drinks and More Dynamic Beverage Niches
    • Kids as Growth Drivers
    • Hispanics as Growth Drivers
    • Healthy Competition: Beverages
    • Healthy Competition: Foods

  • Projected Market Growth
    • Market to Approach $26 Billion in 2008
    • Table 3-13: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Fruit Products, 2003-2008 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-14: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Fruit Juices, 2003-2008 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-15: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Packaged Fruit, 2003-2008 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-16: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Fruit Confectionary, 2003-2008 (in millions of dollars)
    • Fruit Rolls to Exceed $725 Million at Mass
    • Table 3-17: Projected Mass-Market Sales of Fruit Rolls, Bars, and Snacks, 2003-2008 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-18: Projected Mass-Market Sales of Frozen Fruit, 2003-2008 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-19: Projected Mass-Market Sales of Canned/Bottled Citrus Fruit, 2003-2008 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-20: Projected Mass-Market Sales of Shelf-Stable Bottled Smoothies, 2003-2008 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-21: Projected Mass-Market Sales of Refrigerated Smoothies, 2003-2008 (in millions of dollars)

Chapter 4: The Competitive Situation

  • Marketers and Brands
    • Marketer Overview
    • Licensing an Important Market Component
    • The Big Get Bigger
    • Strong Competition from Private Label
    • Table 4-1: Selected U.S. Marketers of Fruit Products

  • Marketer and Brand Shares
    • Methodology
    • PepsiCo and Coca-Cola Top the List
    • No. 3 Altria/Kraft Outpaces Leaders
    • Figure 4-1: Top Marketers of Fruit Products by 2003 Share of IRI-Tracked Sales (percent)
    • Double Threats: Ocean Spray, Cadbury Schweppes, Welch Foods, Nestlé
    • Campbell Outperforming Other Marketers
    • Non-Juice Marketers Round Out Rankings
    • Top Marketers and Brands by Sales Gains
    • Campbell Soup Posts 13.6% Gain
    • Figure 4-2: Top Marketers of Fruit Products by Two-Year Gains in IRI-Tracked Sales (percent)
    • Fruit Confectionary Leaders General Mills, J.M. Smucker Post Gains
    • Altria/Kraft Has Greatest Dollar Increase
    • Newer Brands Make Best Showings
    • Fruit Confectionary, “Alternative Beverage” Brands Do Well
    • Kids’ Juice Brands Post Double-Digit Increases
    • The Wonderful Pomegranate
    • Marketer/Brand Sales and Shares by Selected Subcategories
    • Tropicana OJ Powers PepsiCo Gain in Refrigerated Juices
    • Four Marketers Post Double-Digit Gains in Bottled Juices
    • Altria/Kraft Share of Aseptic Juices Tops 50%
    • Coca-Cola Advances to Third in Canned Juices
    • Private Label Gains in Fruit Drink Mixes
    • Have Juice Concentrates Bottomed Out?
    • No. 2 Dole Outperforms All Competitors in Canned/Bottled Fruit
    • Ocean Spray, Mariani Improve Positions in Dried Fruit
    • Private Label Controls Over 70% of Frozen Fruit, Maraschino Cherries
    • Smucker Co. Widens Lead in Jams, Jellies, and Preserves
    • General Mills Rules Fruit Snacks, But Brach’s Confections, Private Label Advance
    • Pie Filling: Nestlé, Private Label Gain on No. 1 Agrilink
    • Table 4-2: U.S. Fruit Products Market: Top Marketers/Brands by IRI-Tracked Sales and Shares, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-3: Fruit Juice Category: Top Marketers/Brands by IRI-Tracked Sales and Shares, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-4: Packaged Fruit Category: Top Marketers/Brands by IRI-Tracked Sales and Shares, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-5: Fruit Confectionary Category: Top Marketers/Brands by IRI-Tracked Sales and Shares, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-6: Top Marketers of Fruit Products by Two-Year Gains in IRI-Tracked Sales, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-7: Top Brands of Fruit Products by Two-Year Gains in IRI-Tracked Sales, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-8: Refrigerated Juices/Drinks: Top Marketers/Brands by IRI-Tracked Sales and Shares, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-9: Shelf-Stable Bottled Juices: Top Marketers/Brands by IRI-Tracked Sales and Shares, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-10: Aseptic Juices: Top Marketers/Brands by IRI-Tracked Sales and Shares, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-11: Shelf-Stable Canned Juices: Top Marketers/Brands by IRI-Tracked Sales and Shares, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-12: Fruit Drink Mixes: Top Marketers/Brands by IRI-Tracked Sales and Shares, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-13: Canned/Bottled Fruit: Top Marketers/Brands by IRI-Tracked Sales and Shares, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-14: Dried Fruit/Glazed Fruit: Top Marketers/Brands by IRI-Tracked Sales and Shares, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-15: Jams, Jellies, and Preserves: Top Marketers/Brands by IRI-Tracked Sales and Shares, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-16: Fruit Rolls, Bars, and Snacks: Top Marketers/Brands by IRI-Tracked Sales and Shares, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-17: Pie/Pastry Filling: Top Marketers/Brands by IRI-Tracked Sales and Shares, 2001 vs. 2003 (in millions of dollars)

Chapter 5: Competitor Profiles

  • Competitor Profile: PepsiCo, Inc.
    • Overview
    • Branching Out from Carbonated Soft Drinks
    • Tropicana Reigns in Refrigerated Orange Juice
    • Taking Aim at C-Stores
    • Focus on Smoothies

  • Competitor Profile: Coca-Cola Co
    .
    • Overview
    • Forms Beverage Institute for Health & Wellness
    • Phasing Out Fruitopia

  • Competitor Profile: Altria Group/Kraft Foods, Inc.
    • Overview
    • Developing Healthier Products
    • New Alliance with South Beach Diet
    • After-School Health and Wellness

  • Competitor Profile: Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc.
    • Overview
    • Ocean Spray Rejects PepsiCo Offer
    • Craisins Brand Gets First Ad Campaign
    • New Line Combines Fruit Juice and Tea

  • Competitor Profile: Cadbury Schweppes Plc
    • Overview
    • Growing Non-Carbonated Business Through Acquisitions
    • Snapple Wins Contract for New York City Schools

  • Competitor Profile: Welch Foods, Inc.
    • Overview
    • Addressing Health and Convenience Issues
    • Boosts Advertising Outlay

  • Competitor Profile: Nestlé USA, Inc.
    • Overview
    • Targets Hispanics with Kerns Aguas Frescas

  • Competitor Profile: Campbell Soup Co.
    • Overview
    • Enter Invigor8 Juice/Energy Drinks
    • Pumping Up V8: Targeting Hispanics and Adding a Twist
    • Going Organic

  • Competitor Profile: Del Monte Foods Co.
    • Overview
    • Several Major Non-Fruit Lines Acquired
    • Expanding into Pre-Cut Fruit for Produce and Single-Serve Sizes

  • Competitor Profile: General Mills, Inc.
    • Overview
    • Growth Coming from Sunkist, Cascadian Farm Brands

Chapter 6: Marketing and New Product Trends

  • Advertising Trends
    • Leaders in Advertising Spending
    • Ad Outlays Can Be Large Relative to Retail Sales
    • Altria/Kraft Backs All Four Top Brands
    • PepsiCo’s Tropicana Garners Largest Outlay by Far
    • Coca-Cola Channels Support to Orange Juice
    • Florida’s Natural Ups Spending by Half
    • Ocean Spray Emphasizes White Cranberry Juice, Lemonade
    • Cadbury Schweppes Continues to Focus on Snapple
    • J.M. Smucker Backs Sugar-Free Preserves

  • Advertising Positioning
    • Getting Juiced
    • Courting Carb and Calorie Counters
    • Accentuating the Positive

  • New Product Trends
    • Number of Fruit Juice Introductions Rises Significantly
    • Table 6-1a: Number of New Fruit Product Introductions, 1999-2004
    • Table 6-1b: Number of New Fruit Product Introductions, 1999-2004
    • “Natural” and Related Package Tags Rule Introductions
    • Table 6-2: Fruit Product Selling Points by Package Tags, 2004
    • Many Introductions Target Hispanics
    • Juice-Based Smoothies Find Favor
    • A Taste for the Exotic I: Fruit Juices
    • Pomegranate Juices Continue to Flow
    • A Taste for the Exotic II: Packaged Fruit and Fruit Confectionary
    • The Antioxidant Sweepstakes
    • Turning the Tables on Competitors
    • Old Standbys Lemonade and Grape Juice Retain Appeal
    • More Juice/Fruit Content Is Healthier
    • Fortification Trend Continues
    • Boundary Blurs Between Fruit Juices and Functional Beverages
    • Massive Effort to Woo the Weight-Conscious
    • “Light” Introductions Abound
    • Organic Fruit Products Enter the Mainstream Oodles of Organics
    • Licensed Fruit Products Appeal to Kids
    • Packaging: “All About Convenience and Portability”
    • Serving Grab-and-Go Customer Blurs Boundary Between Packaged Fruit and Fresh
    • Retail Trends
    • Internet Trends
    • Table 6-3: U.S. Fruit Products Market: Selected New Product Introductions from Leading Marketers, January 2003-June 2004

Chapter 7: Consumer Trends

  • Consumer Overview
    • The Simmons Survey System
    • 90% Penetration Rate for Jams, Jellies, and Preserves
    • Patterns by Age Bracket
    • The Gender Skew
    • West Is Top Region
    • Patterns by Race/Ethnicity
    • Patterns by Household Size: The Tomato Juice Exception
    • Patterns by Household Income
    • Consumer Focus: Minority Preferences
    • Consumer Focus: The Kid Factor
    • Table 7-1: Overall Usage Rates for Selected Fruit Product Classifications, 2003 (U.S. households)
    • Table 7-2a: Usage Rates for Selected Fruit Product Classifications: By Adult Age Bracket, 2003 (U.S. households)
    • Table 7-2b: Usage Rates for Selected Fruit Product Classifications: By Adult Age Bracket, 2003 (U.S. households)
    • Table 7-3: Usage Rates for Selected Fruit Product Classifications: By Gender, 2003 (U.S. households)
    • Table 7-4: Usage Rates for Selected Fruit Product Classifications: By Region, 2003 (U.S. households)
    • Table 7-5: Usage Rates for Selected Fruit Product Classifications: By Race/Ethnicity, 2003 (U.S. households)
    • Table 7-6: Usage Rates for Selected Fruit Product Classifications: By Household Size, 2003 (U.S. households)
    • Table 7-7a: Usage Rates for Selected Fruit Product Classifications: By Household Income Bracket, 2003 (U.S. households)
    • Table 7-7b: Usage Rates for Selected Fruit Product Classifications: By Household Income Bracket, 2003 (U.S. households)
    • Table 7-8: Usage Rates for Jams, Jellies, and Preserves: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households by Race/Ethnicity, 2003 (percent)
    • Table 7-9: Usage Rates for Canned/Jarred Fruit: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households by Race/Ethnicity, 2003 (percent)
    • Table 7-10: Usage Rates for Orange Juice in Bottles/Cans/Cartons: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households by Race/Ethnicity, 2003 (percent)
    • Table 7-11: Usage Rates for Fruit Juices/Drinks Other Than Orange: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households by Race/Ethnicity, 2003 (percent)
    • Table 7-12: Usage Rates for Tomato and Vegetable Juice: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households by Race/Ethnicity, 2003 (percent)
    • Table 7-13: Usage Rates for Frozen Orange Juice: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households by Race/Ethnicity, 2003 (percent)
    • Table 7-14: Usage Rates for Fruit Snacks: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households by Race/Ethnicity, 2003 (percent)
    • Table 7-15: Usage Rates for Fruit Juice Frozen Novelty Treats: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households by Race/Ethnicity, 2003 (percent)
    • Table 7-16: Usage Rates for Jams, Jellies, and Preserves: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households With Children by Age Bracket, 2003 (percent)
    • Table 7-17: Usage Rates for Canned/Jarred Fruit: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households With Children by Age Bracket, 2003 (percent)
    • Table 7-18: Usage Rates for Orange Juice in Bottles/Cans/Cartons: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households With Children by Age Bracket, 2003 (percent)
    • Table 7-19: Usage Rates for Fruit Juices/Drinks Other Than Orange: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households With Children by Age Bracket, 2003 (percent)
    • Table 7-20: Usage Rates for Tomato and Vegetable Juice: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households With Children by Age Bracket, 2003 (percent)
    • Table 7-21: Usage Rates for Frozen Orange Juice: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households With Children by Age Bracket, 2003 (percent)
    • Table 7-22: Usage Rates for Fruit Snacks: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households With Children by Age Bracket, 2003 (percent)
    • Table 7-23: Usage Rates for Fruit Juice Frozen Novelty Treats: U.S. Households Overall vs. Households With Children by Age Bracket, 2003 (percent)

Chapter 8: Looking Ahead

  • Trends and Opportunities
      The Opportunity
    Health Claims as Potent Selling Point Product Innovation Is Key Facing the Low-Carb Demon Harvesting the Snack Potential of Fruit Products Improving on Convenience Tapping into the Asian- and African-American Markets On the Market?

    Appendix: Addresses of Selected Marketers