The U.S. Eyewear Market: Prescription and Nonprescription Lenses, Sunglasses, Contact Lenses, and Frames, 2nd Edition

Jun 1, 2009
187 Pages - Pub ID: LA2091871
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In the past, the eyewear industry was more or less insulated from economic downturns, as eyewear was deemed a stable commodity product. That changed as eyewear grew into a fashion product and more prone to the whims of consumers and the ups and downs of economic markets. The big question is whether consumers will purchase fashionable brand name eyewear in the midst of an economic crisis as seemingly more pressing demands are at hand. Eyewear stores across the United States had already seen the effects of the economic downturn with many stores reporting significant drop offs in store traffic at the end of 2008. And by the end of first quarter 2009, some underperforming stores had been closed and manufacturing plants were idled.

Though the market for eyewear in the U.S. grew at an annual rate of eight percent between 2004 and 2008, growth in 2008 was much more subdued at less than four percent. For the eyewear industry, an ongoing consumer paradigm shift in attitudes towards more frugality and less conspicuous consumption means high-flying fashion brands may suffer at the expense of less expensive alternatives. But can the major marketers and retailers adapt?

The U.S. Eyewear Market: Prescription and Nonprescription Lenses, Sunglasses, Contact Lenses, and Frames, 2nd Edition examines these questions and others by looking at the current market, trends, major brands, and consumer preferences. The report presents concise, thought provoking analyses of various aspects of the eyewear industry and provides a forecast for the market through 2013.

Read an excerpt from this report below.

Report Methodology

The information presented in this report was obtained from primary and secondary research. Primary research entailed on-site examination of eyewear products in retail stores and consultations with eyewear industry observers and executives. Secondary research involved canvassing information and articles appearing in financial, marketing, and trade publications, company literature, and independent research reports, plus reviews of websites, blogs and readers’ comments posted on these sites.

Other sources consulted for The U.S. Eyewear Market were the U.S. Census Bureau’s Economic Census (1997, 2002, and 2007), Annual Survey of Manufacturers, Advanced Monthly Sales for Retail and Foodservice and the Annual Retail Trade Survey. Other market data sources included the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), and the U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC).

The analysis of consumer behavior and demographics is based on data from the Simmons Market Research Bureau (New York NY) Spring 2008 and Summer 2008 Study of Media and Markets, which is based on the responses of over 20,000 adults age 18 and over.

About the Author

Cogitamus Consulting is a branding and market research boutique in NYC that's all about hard work, imagination and common sense. Working with our clients, we custom tailor solutions and provide creative, thought-provoking analysis that address the most pertinent questions facing marketers, through general business consulting, white papers, and branded product concept and strategy development.

Chapter 1: Executive Summary
Report Scope
Report Methodology
Categories and Products
Market Size & Growth
Global Eyewear Retail Market Dims 3%
Figure 1-1: Global Retail Eyewear Market, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
U.S. Retail Eyewear Market
Figure 1-2: Total Retail U.S. Eyewear Market and Percent of Total Global Retail Market, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Retail is Major Point of Sale
Figure 1-3: Share of U.S. Retail Eyewear Market by Major Type of Business, 2008 (%)
Eyewear Sales by Product Category
Figure 1-4: Share of U.S. Retail Eyewear Market by Major Eyewear Type, 2008 (%)
Market Forecast
Global Market Growth at 1.4% Through 2013
Figure 1-5: Global Retail Eyewear Market Forecast, 2008-2013 (in millions $)
U.S. Retail Eyewear Market
Figure 1-6: Total U.S. Retail Eyewear Market and Percent of Total Global Retail Market, 2008-2013 (in millions $)
Competitive Landscape
Overview
Top Eyewear Companies Worldwide
Figure 1-7: Share of Global Wholesale Eyewear Market by Manufacturer, 2008 (%)
Top U.S. Retail Eyewear Companies
Figure 1-8: U.S. Eyewear Retailers’ Market Shares, 2008 (%)
Marketplace and Consumer Trends
Down Economy Means Thriftier Consumer
Fashion Industry Feeling the Pinch
Figure 1-9: Quarterly Clothing and Clothing Accessory Store Sales, 1992-Q1, 2009 (in billions $)
Expensive Branded Eyewear May Suffer
Consumers Not Vested in Eye Health
Managed Vision Care Influencing Purchases
Boomers Are Key Target Market
Kids’ Eyewear Important Too
Company Ethics and Added Values Important to Consumers
Recessionary Slump in Travel Will Impact Travel Purchases
Global Warming Means the Sun Will Shine Even Stronger
Counterfeiting, a Dangerous Business
Innovation and Design Trends
Choice Enables Constant Consumer Evolution of Me
More than Function and More than Fashion
Classic Styles Return
Logo a No Go
Designers, and Others, Seek Opportunity in Eyewear
Complementary Eyewear Category to Attract New Consumers
Technological Innovation Spurs New Products
Marketing Outreach
Opportunities for Marketers to Engage Loyal Consumers
LensCrafters’ Campaign Pulls the Right Heart Strings
Integrate, Integrate, Integrate
Bausch & Lomb’s Presbyopia Outreach Integrated Plan
Couponing Coming Back Strong Through Internet
Internet Main Place for Printable Coupons
Make Use of Alternative Medias
Doesn’t Need to be Flashy, Practical Works Too
Behavioral Targeting in Diverse Consumer Market
Product Placement Opportunities Abound
Away from Fashion to Health and Beauty
Rental Therapy, not Retail Therapy
Word-of-Mouth: Added-Value for Marketers and Consumers
Personalization, Control, Choice and Flexibility
The Consumer
Prescription Eyewear Penetration Levels at 59%
Figure 1-10: Consumer Penetration of Prescription Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses, 2003-2008 (%)
Wal-Mart Stealing Penetration Share
Table 1-1: Retail Locations for Consumer Purchases of Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses, 2003-2008 (%)
Selected Demographic Profiles: Optometrist versus Wal-Mart
Prescription Eyeglasses: Changeable Tint on Upward Trend
Table 1-2: Prescription Eyeglasses Penetration, 2003-2008 (%)
Prescription Contacts: Disposable Dominates
Table 1-3: Prescription Contact Lenses Penetration, 2003-2008 (%)
Sunglasses: Women Slightly More Involved
Table 1-4: Penetration of Men’s and Women’s Non-Prescription Sunglasses (Bought in Last 12 Months), 2004-2008 (%)
Consumer Demographics of Sunglass Users


Chapter 2: The Market
Report Scope
Report Methodology
Categories and Products
A Closer Look at Eyewear Products
Prescription Lenses and Lens Treatments
Prescription Frames
Plano Eyewear
Contact Lenses
A Brief History of Eyewear
Corrective Lenses in Use for Centuries
Figure 2-1: Portrait by Tommaso da Modena, One of the First Known Images of Spectacle Use
Johannes Kepler Explains Why Lenses Work
Benjamin Franklin Invents Bifocals
Concavity Improves Upon Original Lens Design
Sunglasses Developed for Sailors
Contact Lenses Have Evolved Over 100 Years
Style Comes Late to Story, but Has Taken Over the Narrative
Figure 2-2: Robert Q. Lewis and His Distinctive Eyewear
Figure 2-3: Tom Cruise’s Iconic Sunglasses in Risky Business
Packaging and Labeling
Federal Regulations
Health Professionals Write Prescriptions
Framed Eyewear Must Meet Impact Resistance Requirements
Medical Device Reporting Standards Apply
Regulators Act in Interest of Consumer
Sunglasses "Use Category" Labeling Is Voluntary
Table 2-1: Standards for Sunglass Blockage (%)
Voluntary Compliance with "Use Category" Labeling Is Lacking
Market Size & Growth
Eyewear Not Insulated From Worldwide Economic Woes
Marketers Optimistic Though
Global Eyewear Retail Market Dims 3%
Figure 2-4: Global Retail Eyewear Market, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Previous Growth Driven by Emerging Economies, Lower U.S. Dollar
Table 2-2: Global Retail Eyewear Market and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
U.S. Retail Eyewear Market
Figure 2-5: Total U.S. Retail Eyewear Market and Percent of Total Global Retail Market, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Consumer Spending, Inflation, Lower Dollar Mute Growth
Table 2-3: Total U.S. Retail Eyewear Market and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Retail is Major Point of Sale
Figure 2-6: Share of U.S. Retail Eyewear Market by Major Type of Business, 2008 (%)
Optical Goods Stores, Supercenters Leading Retail Outlets
Figure 2-7: Share of U.S. Retail Eyewear Market by Channel, 2008 (%)
Eyewear Sales by Product Category
Prescription Eyeglasses Dominant
U.S. Contact Lens Market Fully Mature
Table 2-4: U.S. Retail Eyewear Market by Major Eyewear Type, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Non-Prescription, Sunglasses See Accelerated Growth
Goggles, Other Products Boom
Figure 2-8: Share of U.S. Retail Eyewear Market by Major Eyewear Type, 2008 (%)
U.S. Retail Eyewear Channel Sales
Figure 2-9: Total U.S. Retail Eyewear Store Sales and Percent of Total U.S. Retail Market, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Table 2-5: Total U.S. Retail Eyewear Store Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Optical Store Share Largest, but Clubs and Supercenters See More Robust Growth
Department Stores Bear Brunt of Loses
Figure 2-10: Share of U.S. Retail Eyewear Store Sales by Store Type, 2008 (%)
U.S. Healthcare Specialist Eyewear Sales
Figure 2-11: Total U.S. Optometrist & Other Healthcare Services Eyewear Sales and Percent of U.S. Retail Eyewear Market, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Optometrist Eyewear Growth Stable
Table 2-6: Total U.S. Optometrist & Other Health Care Services Eyewear Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Optometrist Share of Eyewear Sold Unchanged
Figure 2-12: Share of U.S. Optometrist Eyewear Sales versus Optometrist Services, 2008 (%)
Market Forecast
Global Market Growth at 1.4% Through 2013
Figure 2-13: Global Retail Eyewear Market Forecast, 2008-2013 (in millions $)
Table 2-7: Global Retail Eyewear Market Forecast and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2008-2013 (in millions $)
Global Growth Outside U.S
U.S. Retail Eyewear Market
Figure 2-14: Total U.S. Retail Eyewear Market and Percent of Total Global Retail Market, 2008-2013 (in millions $)
Table 2-8: Total U.S. Retail Eyewear Market and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2008-2013 (in millions $)
Growth Tempered by Consumer Spending Paradigm Shift
Economy, Wealth Destruction Key to New Consumer Habits
Effect on Eyewear Market
Future Performance by Product
Table 2-9: U.S. Retail Eyewear Market by Major Eyewear Type, 2008-2013 (in millions $)


Chapter 3: Competitive Landscape
Overview
Brands Galore
Made in Italy Still Important
Retail Landscape Varies
Top Eyewear Companies Worldwide
Figure 3-1: Share of Global Wholesale Eyewear Market by Manufacturer, 2008 (%)
Top Contact Lens Companies
Figure 3-2: Share of Global Wholesale Contact Lens Market by Manufacturer, 2008 (%)
Top Eyeglass Lens Companies
Figure 3-3: Share of Global Wholesale Eyeglass Lens Market by Manufacturer, 2008 (%)
Top Eyeglass Frame and Sunglass Companies
Figure 3-4: Share of Global Wholesale Eyeglass Frame and Sunglass Market by Manufacturer, 2008 (%)
Top U.S. Eyewear Retail Companies
Figure 3-5: U.S. Eyewear Retailers’ Market Shares, 2008 (%)
Vertical Integration & Consolidation
Luxottica: Manufacturer and Retailer
De Rigo Big in Europe retailing
Forward Integration Abounds
Fully Integrated
VSP Vision to Copy Highmark?
Luxottica Becoming a Power House
Safilo in Trouble
Competitor Profiles
De Rigo S.p.A.
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-6: DeRigo S.p.A. Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Table 3-1: DeRigo S.p.A. Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Sales by Channel
Figure 3-7: Share of De Rigo S.p.A. Total Net Sales by Channel, 2008 (%)
Brand Portfolio
Table 3-2: De Rigo Brand Portfolio, 2009
Significant Events
De Rigo Partners with Lingerie Company
Figure 3-8: Ipanema
Figure 3-9: Venice Beach
Figure 3-10: Goa
Dollond & Aitchison Merges With Boots Opticians
Luxottica Group S.p.A.
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-11: Luxottica Group S.p.A. and Oakley, Inc. Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Table 3-3: Luxottica Group S.p.A. and Oakley, Inc. Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Sales by Channel
Figure 3-12: Share of Luxottica Group S.p.A. Total Net Sales by Channel, 2008 (%)
Sales by Geography
Figure 3-13: Share of Luxottica Group S.p.A. Total Net Sales by Geography, 2008 (%)
Store Growth
Figure 3-14: Luxottica Group S.p.A. Total Retail Stores: North America and Rest of World, 2004-2008 (number)
Unit Sales Growth and Implied Average Wholesale Price
Figure 3-15: Luxottica Group S.p.A. and Oakley Total Units Manufactured and Average Wholesale Unit Price, 2004-2008 (millions of units, $)
Brand Portfolio
Table 3-4: Luxottica Group S.p.A. Brand Portfolio, 2009
Significant Events
Luxottica Extending Significant Relationships
Ray-Ban Leading Eyewear Brand
Safilo Group S.p.A
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-16: Safilo Group S.p.A. Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Table 3-5: Safilo Group S.p.A. Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Sales by Geography
Figure 3-17: Share of Safilo Group S.p.A. Total Net Sales by Geography, 2008 (%)
Sales by Product
Figure 3-18: Share of Safilo Group S.p.A. Total Net Sales by Product Type, 2008 (%)
Sales by Channel
Figure 3-19: Share of Safilo Group S.p.A. Total Net Sales by Channel, 2008 (%)
Brand Portfolio
Table 3-6: Safilo Group S.p.A. Brand Portfolio, 2009
Significant Events
Bausch & Lomb, Inc
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-20: Bausch & Lomb Inc. Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Table 3-7: Bausch & Lomb Inc. Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Contact Lens Sales
Figure 3-21: Bausch & Lomb Inc. Total Contact Lens Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Table 3-8: Bausch & Lomb Inc. Total Contact Lens Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Brand Portfolio
Table 3-9: Bausch & Lomb Contact Lens Brand Portfolio, 2009
Essilor International
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-22: Essilor International S.A. Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Table 3-10: Essilor International S.A. Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Sales by Geography
Figure 3-23: Share of Essilor International S.A. Total Net Sales by Geography, 2008 (%)
Brand Portfolio
Table 3-11: Essilor International Brand Portfolio, 2009
Johnson & Johnson Vision Care
Overview
Performance
Figure 3-24: Johnson & Johnson Vision Care Total Net Sales, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Table 3-12: Johnson & Johnson Vision Care Total Net Sales and Year-over-Year Percentage Change, 2004-2008 (in millions $)
Sales by Geography
Figure 3-25: Share of Johnson & Johnson Vision Care Total Net Sales by Geography, 2008 (%)
Brand Portfolio
Table 3-13: Johnson & Johnson Vision Care Contact Lens Brand Portfolio


Chapter 4: Marketplace and Consumer Trends
Down Economy Means Thriftier Consumer
Consumers Cut Back
Figure 4-1: Quarterly Retail & Foodservice Sales, 1992-Q1, 2009 (in billions $)
Figure 4-2: Quarterly Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE), 1992-Q1, 2009 (in trillions $)
Fashion Industry Feeling the Pinch
Figure 4-3: Quarterly Clothing and Clothing Accessory Store Sales, 1992-Q1, 2009 (in billions $)
Expensive Branded Eyewear May Suffer
No Longer an Insulated Commodity
Retailers Seeing Effects
Certain Demographics Stabilizing Market
Consumers Not Vested in Eye Health
Lasik Lagging in Poor Economy a Positive for Eyewear
High Cost of Employee Health Care Means Eyecare Plan Changes
Prescription Frames and Lenses Stable
Managed Vision Care Influencing Purchases
Defined Contribution Plans May Be a Boon
HSA Growth Leads to More Spending
Boomers Are Key Target Market
Table 4-1: Projected U.S. Population, by Age Bracket, 2007-2020 (in thousands)
Boomers Have Complicated Emotional Needs
Aging Population Should Benefit Multifocals the Most
Table 4-2: Eyewear Use by Older Americans, 2008 (index)
Boomers Drive Readers Market
Kids’ Eyewear May Need More Than a Fun License
Bespectacled Kids Perceived as Smarter
Contacts Improve Self-Perception in Kids
Company Ethics and Added Values Important to Consumers
Global Consumers: Will Spend More on Ethical Brands
Sustainability Initiatives Offer Myriad Possibilities
And They Are Financially Viable
Recessionary Slump in Travel Will Impact Travel Purchases
Global Warming Means the Sun Will Shine Even Stronger
Counterfeiting, a Dangerous Business
A Never-ending Battle


Chapter 5: Innovation and Design Trends
Choice Enables Constant Consumer Evolution of Me
Room for More Than One Pair
More than Function and More than Fashion
Classic Styles Return
Bold and Rock & Roll
Figure 5-1: Cinzia by Cinzia Designs
Figure 5-2: Cazal by Eastern States Eyewear
Figure 5-3: Corinne McCormack by Corinne McCormack, Inc
Figure 5-4: Mariella Burani by Grant Italia
A Return to Femininity
Figure 5-5: Ete by Optylux
Figure 5-6: Nathan Jenden by B. Base IDG
Figure 5-7: Brendel by BBH Eyewear
Figure 5-8: Jill Stuart by Eyewear Designs Limited
International Flavors
Figure 5-9: Jhane Barnes by Kenmark Group (Men)
Figure 5-10: John Paul Gaultier by Fusion Eyewear (Men)
Figure 5-11: Accessories by Ron's by Accessories by Ron's (Women’s)
Figure 5-12: Lafont by Lafont Co. (Women’s)
The Preppy Handbook
Figure 5-13: Colors in Optics’ Vintage Sun
Figure 5-14: Tourneau by Tura LP
Figure 5-15: D&G by Luxottica Group
Figure 5-16: Lacoste by Charmant USA
Relaxed and Loose
Figure 5-17: Randy Jackson by Zyloware Eyewear
Figure 5-18: Hart Schaffner Marx by Signature Eyewear
Figure 5-19: Dolce & Gabbana by Luxottica Group
Figure 5-20: Solterra Designs by Zoom Eyeworks
Logo a No Go
Designers, and Others, Seek Opportunity in Eyewear
Complementary Eyewear Category to Attract New Consumers
Fashion, Sports, Footwear, Celebrity and More—Entering Eyewear
Branded Readers Introduced Outside of Eyewear and Accessories
Technological Innovation Spurs New Products
Computer Use Causes Special Eye Issues
Science and Technology Come to Eyewear
Setting Sights on Nano-Technology
Room For Low Tech
Grassroots Development a Rich Source for Ideas
Contact Innovation Ongoing, But Message Not Heard


Chapter 6: Marketing Outreach
Opportunities for Marketers to Engage Loyal Consumers
LensCrafters’ Campaign Pulls the Right Heart Strings
Get Close to Your Core Consumer
Re-enforce Brand Values with Appropriate Strategies and Tactics
Integrate, Integrate, Integrate
Bausch & Lomb’s Presbyopia Outreach Plan
Price War in Eyewear’s Future?
Virtual Marketing Makes Most of Recession Dollars
More People Cocooning and Online in Recession
Couponing Coming Back Strong Through Internet
Internet Main Place for Printable Coupons
Vast Array of Coupon Sites
Make Use of Alternative Medias
Doesn’t Need to be Flashy, Practical Works Too
Behavioral Targeting in Diverse Consumer Market
Mobile Offering Sees Positive Response
Study Shows Interest in Location/Time Based Mobile Coupons
Product Placement Opportunities Abound
Placement Not Limited to Television or Film
Reliance on Sports Icons and Imagery
Good Causes a Good Draw
Luxottica Launches OneSight
Appropriate and Authentic Celebrity Relationships
Make Sure the License is a Good Fit
Political Arena, the Next Big Thing?
Away from Fashion and into Health and Beauty
Customer Service Benefits Become Important Again
Rental Therapy, not Retail Therapy
Word-of-Mouth: Added-Value for Marketers and Consumers
Does WOM Need the Human Touch?
Personalization, Control, Choice and Flexibility


Chapter 7: The Consumer
Note on Simmons Market Research Bureau Consumer Data
Prescription Eyewear Penetration Levels at 59%
Figure 7-1: Penetration of Prescription Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses, 2003-2008 (%)
Wal-Mart Stealing Penetration Share
Table 7-1: Retail Locations for Consumer Purchases of Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses, 2003-2008 (%)
Consumer Demographics by Selected Retailer
Optometrist Consumer Evokes White-Collar Boomer
Table 7-2: Optometrist or Eye Doctor Shopper Demographic Characteristics, 2008 (index)
Wal-Mart Shopper Suggests Price-Concerned
Table 7-3: Wal-Mart Vision Center Shopper Demographic Characteristics, 2008 (index)
Other Retailers Usage Strong Among Retirees
Table 7-4: Other Retailers Shopper Demographic Characteristics, 2008 (index)
LensCrafters’ Shopper Traits Similar to Optometry’s
Table 7-5: LensCrafters Shopper Demographic Characteristics, 2008 (index)
Prescription Eyeglasses: Changeable Tint on Upward Trend
Table 7-6: Penetration of Prescription Eyeglasses, 2003-2008 (%)
Purchase Trends Show Same
Table 7-7: Penetration of Prescription Eyeglasses (Bought in Past 12 Months), 2003-2008 (%)
Consumer Demographics by Eyeglass Type
No Surprise—Bifocal Skews Toward Retirees
Table 7-8: Bifocal User Demographic Characteristics, 2008 (index)
Regular Eyeglass Users Hard at Work
Table 7-9: Regular Eyeglass User Demographic Characteristics, 2008 (index)
Changeable Tint User Similar to and Different than Bifocal User
Table 7-10: Changeable Tint Users Demographic Characteristics, 2008 (index)
Prescription Contacts: Disposable Dominates
Table 7-11: Penetration of Prescription Contact Lenses, 2003-2008 (%)
Hard Lenses on the Way Out
Table 7-12: Penetration of Prescription Contact Lenses (Bought in Last 12 Months), 2003-2008 (%)
Consumer Demographics by Type of Contact Used
Disposable Users Skews Young Professional
Table 7-13: Disposable User Demographic Characteristics, 2008 (index)
Soft Users Even Younger
Table 7-14: Soft User Demographic Characteristics, 2008 (index)
Extended Wear Users Popped for Children in Household
Table 7-15: Extended Wear User Demographic Characteristics, 2008 (index)
Slight Differences in Colored and Hard Lens Users
Table 7-16: Colored or Tinted User Demographic Characteristics, 2008 (index)
Table 7-17: Gas Permeable/Hard Wearer Demographic Characteristics, 2008 (index)
Sunglasses: Women Slightly More Involved
Table 7-18: Penetration of Men’s and Women’s Non-Prescription Sunglasses (Bought in Last 12 Months), 2004-2008 (%)
Women Who Have Purchased Two Pairs in Past 12 Months Highest Penetration
Table 7-19: Penetration of Women’s Sunglasses, Number of Purchases in Last 12 Months, 2004-2008 (%)
Table 7-20: Consumer Penetration of Men’s Sunglasses, Number of Purchases in Last 12 Months, 2004-2008 (%)
Consumer Demographics of Sunglass Users
Table 7-21: Sunglass User Demographic Characteristics, Men and Women, 2008 (index)
Consumer Agreement with Select Attitudinal Statements
Style a Motivating Factor, More so for Women
Lack of Insurance an Issue for Hispanics and Blacks
One-Third Spending Less on Eyewear
Education a Factor in Medical Procedures
Table 7-22: Consumer Agreement with Selected Attitudinal Statements, 2008 (%)
Table 7-23: Top Demographic Characteristics of Consumers Who Agree with the Statement: Style Glasses Is As Important As Function, 2008 (index)
Table 7-24: Top Demographic Characteristics of Consumers Who Agree with the Statement: My Insurance Limits Choices I Can Make, 2008 (index)
Table 7-25: Demographic Characteristics of Consumers Who Agree with the Statement: I am Buying Less Expensive Eyewear Because Of Economy, 2008 (index)
Table 7-26: Demographic Characteristics of Consumers Who Agree with the Statement: Medical Innovations Are a Better Solution Than Glasses, 2008 (index)


Appendix: Addresses of Selected Marketers

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