Heads Up on Humane in Meat and Poultry Industries

Heads Up on Humane in Meat and Poultry Industries

Consumer concern over animal welfare issues has reached critical mass in the meat and poultry industries, creating a new generation of challenges and opportunities. This development, kindred to the organic movement, is readily apparent in the proliferation of overt product claims such as  certified humane, cruelty free, and cage-free, along with linked claims such as antibiotic-free, hormone-free, or grass-fed. 

Packaged Facts 2017 survey data on current practices and regulations for animal welfare

On the one hand, new Packaged Facts survey data from February/March 2017 show that nearly half of U.S. consumers agree (somewhat or strongly) that livestock animals are “treated appropriately under current practices and regulations,” against only a fifth who disagree.

The contingent who strongly agree that livestock animals are treated appropriately (20%) correspondingly outnumbers those who strongly disagree (9%).

Table 1: Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with the statement: "I'm satisfied that animals raised for food are treated appropriately under current practices and regulations," 2017   

Strongly Agree

Somewhat Agree

Neither Agree Nor Disagree

Somewhat Disagree

Strongly Disagree

20%

28%

31%

12%

9%

Source: Packaged Facts Online Consumer Survey, February-March 2017

On the other hand, a growing range of consumers are paying more attention to the treatment of food animals. Packaged Facts data also show that a quarter (26%) of consumers strongly agree, and another third (32%) somewhat agree, that they are becoming more concerned about the treatment of animals raised for food. 

In contrast, only 15% of U.S. consumers somewhat or strongly disagree that livestock animal treatment is of increasing concern.

Table 2: Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with the statements: "I am more concerned than I was a few years ago about the treatment of animals raised for food," 2017 

Strongly Agree

Somewhat Agree

Neither Agree Nor Disagree

Somewhat Disagree

Strongly Disagree

26%

32%

28%

8%

6%

Source: Packaged Facts Online Consumer Survey, February-March 2017

Packaged Facts’ new report, Animal Welfare: Issues and Opportunities in the Meat, Poultry, and Egg Markets in the U.S., charts the changing attitudes and emerging opportunities for marketers of beef, poultry, eggs, meat substitute, and vegetable protein products.  The opportunities range from product development, labeling, and marketing to M&A activity and investor relations—and extend beyond the fresh meat and dairy cases to in-store prepared foods and foodservice menus.

As   David Sprinkle, research director for Packaged Facts, reports: “Agricultural producers, food retailers, and restaurants alike are playing key roles in growing the market for protein products that satisfy next-generation consumer demands for food animal welfare.”

Where to purchase “Animal Welfare: Issues and Opportunities in the Meat, Poultry, and Egg Markets in the U.S.”

Find Packaged Facts’ latest report at: www.packagedfacts.com/Animal-Welfare-Meat-10771767/. The report discusses important food industry trends pertaining to beef, pork, poultry, chicken, turkey, eggs, meat substitutes, vegetable proteins, plant proteins, veganism, vegetarianism, and flexitarianism, as well as certified human, cruelty free, cage free, pasture raised, free range, grass fed, antibiotic free, steroid free, and hormone free.

 Visit the link and you can also view additional information about the report including the abstract, table of contents, related research, and more.

-- by David Sprinkle, research director, Packaged Facts