Tea and Ready-to-Drink Tea in the U.S., 3rd Edition

Nov 1, 2007
281 Pages - Pub ID: LA1282368
Share this report
Attention: There is an updated edition available for this report.
 
Online Download $3,000
Hard Copy Mail Delivery $3,400
Global Site License $6,000
Online Download plus 1 Hard Copy $3,800
Tea is one of the most underdeveloped beverages in the United States. The potential is enormous, as tea barely compares in market size to beverage categories such as carbonated soft drinks, coffee and water. Moreover, numerous variables are in place to help drive the growth of tea sales.

Tea fits into the well-established movement among aging baby boomers to seek out foods and beverages that promise wellness and anti-aging effects. These aging boomers are not the major market for RTD iced tea beverages like Snapple, which targets college students and recent grads, nor are they the prime buyers of established tea bag and instant tea brands such as Lipton, which skew toward seniors. Boomers are the drivers of specialty teas, in every way, shape and form.

Furthermore, what makes tea uniquely positioned in the functional beverage category is that tea is inherently healthful. It’s not some sweetened, water-based drink loaded with fortifying ingredients. Tea is a nutritional powerhouse all on its own.

Packaged Facts’ new report, Tea and Ready-to-Drink Tea in the U.S., 3rd Edition, explores tea’s new prominence and the impact on the market and the consumer psyche.

This report examines the U.S. tea market—retail and foodservice. On the retail side, products include instant tea (multi-serving containers and single-serve/on-the-go packets), leaf tea (loose, bagged and stick forms), liquid concentrate (requires dilution prior to consumption) and ready-to-drink (RTD) (single-serve and multi-serve containers—shelf-stable and refrigerated).

Retail sales come from numerous channels. Mainstream venues are supermarkets, drug stores and mass merchandisers. Other retail venues include club stores, convenience stores (c-stores), dollar stores, drugstores, health/natural foods stores, specialty coffee/tea stores/cafes and “other,” which includes non-traditional food stores such as movie rental establishments, sporting goods shops, toy stores, bookstores, mail order and the Internet, as well as specialty stores that carry a limited assortment of a unique mix of foods and beverages (e.g., Trader Joe’s, Cost Plus, Fox & Obel, etc.).

Report Methodology
The information in Tea and Ready-to-Drink Tea in the U.S. is based on both primary and secondary research. Primary research involved on-site examination of the retail milieu, interviews with marketing, public relations and industry analysts within the beverage market and consultants to the industry. Market size data was derived from Information Resources, Inc. Secondary research entailed data-gathering from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature. New product information is gathered via literature research, personal interviews and data compiled by ProductScan, a service of Datamonitor. Consumer information was derived from Simmons Market Research Bureau, fall 2006 National Consumer Survey.

What You’ll Get in this Report
Tea and Ready-to-Drink Tea in the U.S.makes important predictions and recommendations regarding the future of this market, and pinpoints ways current and prospective marketers can capitalize on current trends and spearhead new ones. No other market research report provides both the comprehensive analysis and extensive data that Tea and Ready-to-Drink Tea in the U.S. offers. The report addresses the following segments:

  • The Market (including market size and composition, and projected market growth)
  • The Marketers (including discussions of specific marketer brand and market shares)
  • Competitive Profiles (of the mainstream marketers, specialists and up-and-coming niche players, and analyses of the products they market)
  • Retail and Foodservice Strategies
  • The Consumer (who’s buying what, and where)
  • The Products
  • Trends and Opportunities

Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

How You Will Benefit from this Report
If your company is already competing in the food/beverage industry, or is considering making the leap, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current market for tea and ready-to-drink tea, as well as projected sales and trends through 2012. Contributing to that understanding will be a complete analysis of sales data, and a detailed discussion of the consumer for tea based on Simmons data.

This report will help:

  • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for tea and RTD tea.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for tea products.
  • Advertising agencies working with clients in the food/beverage industry understand the product buyer to develop messages and images that compel consumers to purchase these products.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.

Chapter 1 Executive Summary
  • Markets Analyzed
  • Products Outside Scope
  • The Products
    • A Note About Nomenclature
    • Grading Is an Art, Not a Science
    • Segments and Packaging Options
    • Regulatory Overview

  • Size and Growth of Market
    • 2007 Sales Ring in at $7.4 Billion
    • 2012 Sales Projected to Reach Almost $15 Billion
    • Table 1-1 U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea, 2003-2012 (in millions of dollars)
    • RTD-Packaged Tea Rules the Market
    • Figure 1-1 Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea by Product Category, 2007 (percent share)
    • Retail Sales Are More than Half of All Tea Sales
    • Figure 1-2 Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea: Retail vs. Foodservice, 2007 (percent share)
    • Total RTD Is Three-Fourths of All Sales
    • Figure 1-3 Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea: RTD vs. All Other Forms, 2007 (percent share)
    • Specialty Tea Is More Than a Third of All Sales
    • Figure 1-4 Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea: Specialty Tea vs. Mainstream Tea, 2007 (percent share)

  • Market Drivers
    • Numerous Drivers for Tea Sales Growth

  • The Marketers
    • Complex International Structure
    • Marketers Are the Focus of This Study
    • All Types of Marketers Serve the Industry
    • Retail Category Leaders
    • Market Leaders Are Big Spenders
    • Trade Advertisement Is Strong for Tea

  • Tea in Foodservice Channels
    • Tea Becomes More Readily Available in Foodservice
    • Dispensed Ice Tea Options
    • Steeping a Cup of Hot Tea
    • Tea Room by Any Other Name

  • The Retail Tea Business
    • How Tea Gets to Retail Venues
    • Where Is Most Retail Tea Purchased?
    • Table 1-2 U.S. Retail Tea and RTD Tea: Share of Dollar Sales by Outlet, 2007
    • What Is Selling and Where?

  • The Tea Consumer
    • The Amount and Type of Tea that Americans Consume
    • Consumers Are in an Overall Health and Wellness Revolution
    • Is Organic an Important Positioning for Tea Consumers?
    • Tea and RTD Usage Levels
    • Table 1-3 Percentage Who Use Tea and RTD Tea, by Product Type

  • New Products and Trends
    • What Is Driving New Products and Trends in Tea?
    • Table 1-4 Total Number of Tea SKUs Introduced to the U.S. Marketplace, July 2006 to June 2007
    • Table 1- 5 Rank in the Most Used Flavors in New Tea Drinks, 2006

Chapter 2 The Products

  • Key Points:
  • Four Segments of Tea Market
    • Four Broad Tea Segments
    • Market Scope
    • Products Outside Scope
    • Tea, Time, and Spirit

  • Types of Tea
    • Teas vs. Tisanes
    • Four Basic Tea Types
    • A Fifth Tea Type—But It’s Not Widely Known
    • Americans Acquiring Tea Connoisseurship
    • If It Is Safe for Consumption, It Can Be a Tisane
    • Tea Brewing Cheat Sheet
    • Table 2-1 Suggested Brewing Times and Temperatures for Select Teas
    • Bubble Tea and Chai
    • Bubble Tea
    • Chai

  • The Grading of Tea
    • Grading Is an Art, Not a Science
    • Whole Leaf
    • Broken Leaf
    • Fannings
    • Dust
    • Additional Modifiers for Grades
    • Extra Descriptors for Green and Oolong Teas
    • Additional Terms

  • Packaging Options and Variations
    • Segments and Packaging Options
    • Bag-in-Box
    • Bag
    • Bottle
    • Box
    • Bulk
    • Canister
    • Can
    • Cap with Mix
    • Carton
    • Disk
    • Dispenser
    • Eye Dropper Bottle
    • Flower
    • Filter Packs for a Pot
    • Jar
    • Jug
    • On-the-Go Packet
    • Pod
    • Spoon
    • Stick
    • Tin

  • Overview of Government Regulation
    • Post-Boston Tea Party
    • Figure 2-1 Exerts from FDA Deputy Commissioner’s Speech to Tea Association of the U.S.A., October 18, 2002
    • The Role of the FDA
    • Labeling Overview
    • Provide the Facts: Nutritional Information Musts
    • Exempt Products
    • Country of Origin
    • Nutrition Regulations in Foodservice
    • Health, Nutrient Content and Structure/Function Claims
    • Significant Scientific Agreement Health Claims
    • Qualified Health Claims
    • Nutrient Content Claims
    • Structure/Function Claims

  • Tea as Health and Wellness Phenomenon
    • Recent Research Supports “Healthy Halo”
    • FDA Rejects Green Tea Health Claim
    • Canada Approves Claims—So Time May Be on Tea’s Side
    • U.S. Marketers Promote Green Tea
    • Enviga and Its “Negative Calorie Effect”
    • Challenge to Enviga from the CSPI

  • Allergen Issues and Product Recalls
    • Allergies and Americans
    • Tea Product Recalls
    • Figure 2-2 Product Recall: Caribbean Dreams Cerasee Tea, May 19, 2006
    • Figure 2-3 Product Recall: Neighbors Coffee Tea, Aug. 16, 2004
    • Figure 2-4 Product Recall: South Beach Beverage Green Tea,
    • Dec. 13, 2002
    • How a Recall Impacts Consumers and Businesses
    • Strong Brands Weather Storms

  • The Ethics of Tea
    • Organic Tea
    • Fair Trade Tea and Tisanes
    • Ethical Tea Partnership
    • Tea and the Rainforest Alliance
    • Nepalese Alliance for Orthodox Tea and Coffee

Chapter 3 The Market

  • Key Points:
  • The Current Tea Situation
    • 2007 Sales Ring in at $7.4 Billion
    • Table 3-1 Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea, 2003-2007 (in millions of dollars)
    • Figure 3-1 Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea, 2003-2007 (in millions of dollars)
    • Retail Sales Are More Than Half of All Tea Sales
    • Table 3-2 Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea: Retail vs. Foodservice, 2003-2007 (in millions of dollars)
    • Read the Tea Leaves to Determine the Tea Form Driving Growth
    • Table 3-3 Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea by Product Category, 2003-2007 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-4 Total U.S. Retail Sales of Tea and RTD Tea by Product Category, 2003-2007 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-5 Total U.S. Retail Sales of RTD-Packaged Tea: Refrigerated vs. Shelf-Stable, 2003-2007 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-6 Total U.S. Foodservice Sales of Tea and RTD Tea by Product Category, 2003-2007 (in millions of dollars)

  • Current Market Composition
    • RTD-Packaged Tea Rules the Market
    • Figure 3-2 Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea by Product Category, 2007 (percent share)
    • Total RTD Is Three-Fourths of All Sales
    • Figure 3-3 Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea: RTD vs. All Other Forms, 2007 (percent share)
    • Premium Skew for Packaged RTD Tea
    • Americans Drink Most of Their Tea Cold
    • Figure 3-4 Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea: Cold vs. Hot, 2007 (percent share)
    • Most U.S. Tea Is Purchased Through Retail Venues
    • Figure 3-5 Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea: Retail vs. Foodservice, 2007 (percent share)
    • Retail Owns the Leaf Tea Business
    • Figure 3-6 Total U.S. Sales of Leaf Tea: Retail vs. Foodservice, 2007 (percent share)
    • RTD-Packaged Tea Is Also Twice as Likely to Come from Retail
    • Figure 3-7 Total U.S. Sales of RTD-Packaged Tea: Retail vs. Foodservice, 2007 (percent share)
    • RTD-Shelf-Stable Is Big Business in Retail
    • Figure 3-8 Total U.S. Retail Sales of Tea and RTD Tea by Product Category, 2007 (percent share)
    • RTD-Packaged Refrigerated Tea Is a Very Small Piece of the Pie
    • Figure 3-9 Total U.S. Retail Sales of RTD Tea: Refrigerated vs. Shelf-Stable, 2007 (percent share)
    • Foodservice RTD-Tea Is Almost a Split Business
    • Figure 3-10 Total U.S. Foodservice Sales of RTD Tea: Dispensed vs. Packaged, 2007 (percent share)
    • Specialty Tea Is More Than a Third of All Sales
    • Figure 3-11 Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea: Specialty Tea vs. Mainstream Tea, 2007 (percent share)
    • Figure 3-12 Total U.S. Sales of Specialty Tea by Tea Variety, 2007 (percent share)
    • 4% of All Tea Sales in the U.S. Are Organic
    • Figure 3-13 Total U.S. Sales of Specialty Tea: Organic vs. Non-Organic, 2007 (percent share)

  • Market Drivers
    • Numerous Drivers for Tea Sales Growth
    • Healthful Halo Surrounding Tea
    • Ongoing, Supportive Research Keeps Focus on Tea Benefits
    • Aging Baby Boomers Seeks Out Wellness Products
    • Tea May Be Ultimate “Functional Beverage”
    • Tea as a Better-For-You Alternative to Soda
    • Tea as a Coffee Alternative
    • Tea Appearing in Countless Products

  • The Projected Tea Situation
    • 2012 Sales Projected to Reach Almost $15 Billion
    • Table 3-7 Projected Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea, 2007-2012 (in millions of dollars)
    • Figure 3-14 Projected Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea, 2007-2012 (in millions of dollars)
    • Retail Sales Projected at $8.9 Billion in 2012
    • Table 3-8 Projected Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea by Market, 2007-2012 (in millions of dollars)
    • Retail Sales to Gain a Bit of Share
    • Figure 3-15 Projected Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea: Retail vs. Foodservice, 2012 (percent share)
    • Instant Tea Is Projected to Show the Least Growth
    • Table 3-9 Projected Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea by Product Category, 2007-2012 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-10 Projected Total U.S. Retail Sales of Tea and RTD Tea by Product Category, 2007-2012 (in millions of dollars)
    • Figure 3-16 Projected Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea by Product Category, 2012 (percent share)
    • Source: Packaged Facts
    • Opportunities for Innovation in Liquid Concentrate
    • 20% CAGR for RTD-Dispensed Tea
    • Table 3-11 Projected Total U.S. Foodservice Sales of Tea and RTD Tea by Product Category, 2007-2012 (in millions of dollars)
    • 3.5% CAGR for Tea Leaves
    • RTD Tea to Command 86% of Market
    • Figure 3-17 Projected Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea: RTD vs. All Other Forms, 2012 (percent share)
    • RTD-Packaged Tea Grows Double-Digits in All Venues
    • Specialty Tea Will Command Half of All Sales
    • Figure 3-18 Projected Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea: Specialty Tea vs. Mainstream Tea, 2012 (percent share)
    • Organic Tea Grows, Too
    • Figure 3-19 Projected Total U.S. Sales of Tea and RTD Tea: Organic vs. Non-Organic, 2012 (percent share)

Chapter 4 The Marketers

  • Key Points:
  • Marketer Overview
  • Complex International Structure
  • Marketers Are the Focus of This Study
  • All Types of Marketers Serve the Industry
  • Select Marketers of Tea and RTD in the United States
  • Leading Brands
  • Interpreting the Sales Data
  • Instant Tea Leaders Are Quite Varied
  • Table 4-1 U.S. Mainstream Retail Sales of Instant Tea: Top-Five Brands by Sales and Share, 2007 (in millions of dollars)
  • Leaf Tea Has Many Players
  • Table 4-2 U.S. Mainstream Retail Sales of Packaged Leaf Tea: Top-10 Brands by Sales and Share, 2007 (in millions of dollars)
  • With Liquid Concentrate, Oregon Chai Is Almost It
  • Refrigerated Iced Tea Booms in the Southeast
  • Table 4-3 U.S. Mainstream Retail Sales of RTD-Packaged, Refrigerated Tea: Top-10 Brands by Sales and Share, 2007 (in millions of dollars)
  • Turkey Hill Means Tea to Many in Northeast and Southeast
  • Milo’s: A Chilling Story
  • Shelf-Stable Has Many, Many Players
  • Table 4-4 U.S. Mainstream Retail Sales of RTD-Packaged, Shelf-Stable Tea: Top-10 Brands by Sales and Share, 2007 (in millions of dollars)
  • Competitive Situation
  • The Buzz in the Industry
  • More on the FUZE Deal
  • Who is Raising Arizona?
  • Both Companies Want Snapple, Too
  • Just Who Is Tata Tea?

  • Marketers: Established Leaders
  • Company Profile: R.C. Bigelow, Inc.
  • Constant Comment
  • The Charleston Tea Plantation
  • New Products
  • Company Profile: The Hain Celestial Group, Inc.
  • In the Beginning
  • New Packaging and Positioning
  • Figure 4-1 New Celestial Seasonings
  • Figure 4-2 Old Celestial Seasonings
  • New Products
  • Tea for Heart Health
  • Company Profile: Nestlé USA-Beverage Division
  • The Ever-Changing Deal with Coke
  • Enviga Gets Mixed Reactions
  • Other New Products
  • Company Profile: Redco Foods, Inc.
  • The European Connection
  • Greentea.com
  • Company Profile: Reily Companies
  • The Reily Family Business
  • Company Profile: Unilever United States, Inc.
  • Overview
  • Pepsi Joint Partnership
  • Lipton Tea Gets Health Seal of Approval
  • Keeping Things Green
  • Marketers: Strong Players
  • Company Profile: Honest Tea, Inc.
  • From Concept to Bottle
  • Glass vs. Plastic
  • Financials and Investments
  • What’s New
  • Going for the Green
  • Company Profile: Ito En
  • Distribution and Acquisition
  • Company Profile: Numi Tea, Inc.
  • About the World-Traveling Rahim Siblings
  • About Flowering Teas
  • Company Profile: Starbucks Coffee Co.
  • The Latest on Starbucks as a Company
  • About Tazo
  • Company Profile: The Republic of Tea, Inc.
  • Overview
  • Marketers: Up and Comers
  • Company Profile: Adagio Teas
  • In the Beginning
  • Specialties
  • Figure 4-3 Adagio Ingenuitea Teapot
  • Figure 4-4 Adagio Display Tea
  • Figure 4-5 Adagio Anteadote
  • Company Profile: Good Earth Teas
  • New Organic Teas
  • Company Profile: Pixie Mate, LLC
  • Product Lineup
  • Company Profile: Sweet Leaf Tea Co.
  • Figure 4-6 The Original Sweet Leaf
  • Growing, Growing and Growing
  • Expansion Plans
  • Company Profile: Tempest Tea
  • Just What Happened in 2002?
  • Where You Can Get Tempted by Tempest
  • Expansion Plans
  • Rapid Growth in the near Future
  • Company Profile: Traditional Medicinals
  • Consumer-Targeted Products
  • Figure 4-7 Traditional Medicinals Organic Mothers Milk Tea
  • Figure 4-8 Traditional Medicinals Organic Nighty Night Tea

    Chapter 5 Foodservice

    • Key Points:
    • Foodservice Tea Options
      • Tea Becomes More Readily Available in Foodservice
      • Foodservice Continues to Grow; Opportunity to Sell More Tea
      • Consumer and Menu Trends
      • How Establishments Get Their Wares
      • Table 5-1 Top-10 U.S. Foodservice Distributors by Dollar Sales, 2006
      • Grocery Wholesalers
      • Sara Lee Offers Numerous Teas to Foodservice Accounts
      • S&D Leads in Iced Tea Bagged Leaves for Foodservice

    • Hot Tea and the Tea House
      • The Tea Leaf Foodservice Business
      • Tea Room by Any Other Name
      • The Number of Tea Houses Is Booming
      • Model Tea House Continues to Open More Locations
      • Who Is Dr. Tea?
      • Strength and Weakness of Tea Houses
      • Teaism: One Way to Overcome Some Weaknesses
      • Another Way Is to Sell Coffee, Too
      • Milking Tea . . . and Brewing Coffee
      • Mom-and-Pop Tea Houses Dominate the Tea House Landscape
      • Tea Service in Hotels and Restaurants
      • Tea and the Spa Market

    • Mainstream Foodservice Iced Tea Offerings
      • Where RTD Dispensed Tea Comes From
      • Some Iced Tea Highlights in Foodservice
      • Something New Is Brewing at Dunkin’ Donuts . . . Iced Tea!
      • McD’s Adds Bottles; Expanding Relations Beyond Coke
      • Speaking of Coke, Here’s What’s New in Foodservice
      • More New Product Details

    Chapter 6 Retail

    • Key Points:
    • Retail Distribution
      • How Tea Gets to Retail Venues
      • Direct Delivery Advantages
      • The Cost of Face-To-Face Business
      • Advantages of Warehouse Delivery
      • Smaller Marketers Work through Brokers
      • Smaller Brands Hitch a Ride with Other Beverage Distributors
      • Making Coffee and Tea More Prominent in Supermarkets
      • How a Small RTD Player Gets into Many Channels
      • Distribution Is Second Highest Cost Next to Production
      • Electronic Data Aids in Restocking

    • Retail Outlets
      • The Retail Environment
      • Shopping Options Are Plentiful
      • Where Are Consumers Shopping for Groceries?
      • Traditional Supermarkets on the Decline
      • Where Is Most Retail Tea Purchased?
      • Table 6-1 U.S. Retail Tea and RTD Tea: Share of Dollar Sales by Outlet, 2007
      • Figure 6-1 U.S. Retail Sales of Tea and RTD Tea, by Outlet, 2007
      • Supermarkets Have the Space
      • RTD Shelf-Stable Tea Leads in Share in Almost All Venues
      • Table 6-2 U.S. Retail Tea and RTD Tea: Share of Dollar Sales for Product Categories by Outlet, 2007
      • Share Breakdown by Retail Venue
      • Figure 6-2 U.S. Retail Sales of Tea and RTD Tea, via Supermarkets, 2007
      • Figure 6-3 U.S. Retail Sales of Tea and RTD Tea, via Mass Merchandisers, 2007
      • Health/Natural Foods Stores Are Big with Leaves
      • Figure 6-4 U.S. Retail Sales of Tea and RTD Tea, via Health/Natural Foods Stores, 2007
      • Which Channels Teas Sell in Most
      • Table 6-3 U.S. Retail Tea and RTD Tea: Share of Dollar Sales for Outlets by Product Category, 2007
      • Figure 6-5 U.S. Retail Sales of Instant Tea, by Outlet, 2007
      • Figure 6-6 U.S. Retail Sales of Leaf Tea, by Outlet, 2007
      • Figure 6-7 U.S. Retail Sales of Liquid Concentrate Tea, by Outlet, 2007
      • Figure 6-8 U.S. Retail Sales of RTD-Packaged, Refrigerated Tea, by Outlet, 2007
      • Figure 6-9 U.S. Retail Sales of RTD-Packaged, Shelf-Stable Tea, by Outlet, 2007

    • The Leading Retailers
      • Which Tea Retailers Are the Largest?
      • Table 6-4 Top Five U.S. Supermarket Chains, by Dollar Sales and Number of Stores, 2007
      • Table 6-5 Top Five U.S. Discount-Style Food Store Chains, by Dollar Sales and Number of Stores, 2007
      • Banner Year for Leading Chains
      • Changes in the Competitive Landscape
      • The Wal-Mart Factor
      • Niche Players Are Specialty Tea Pros
      • Table 6-6 U.S. Retail RTD Tea, Private Label Offerings from Trader Joe’s, 2007
      • Table 6-7 U.S. Retail Tea Leaf Bags: Private Label Retail Price, 2007
      • RTD Private Label Is an Opportunity
      • Retail Pricing Strategies
      • Table 6-8 U.S. Instant Tea: Suggested Retail Price of Selected Brands, 2007
      • Table 6-9 U.S. Leaf Tea: Suggested Retail Price of Selected Brands, 2007
      • Table 6-10 U.S. Liquid Concentrate Tea: Suggested Retail Price of Selected Brands, 2007
      • Table 6-11 U.S. RTD-Packaged, Refrigerated Tea: Suggested Retail Price of Selected Brands, 2007
      • Table 6-12 U.S. RTD-Packaged, Shelf-Stable Tea: Suggested Retail Price of Selected Brands, 2007
      • The Club Store Price Advantage
      • Club Stores Offer the Most Savings
      • Table 6-13 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: Suggested Retail Price of Selected Brands and Club Store Price vs. Supermarket Price, 2007

    Chapter 7 The Consumer

    • Key Points:
    • Tea Consumption Patterns
    • The Amount and Type of Tea that Americans Consume
    • Hot vs. Iced
    • Per Capita Consumption Tracked by the Government
    • Table 7-1 U.S Tea and RTD Tea: Per Capita Consumption, 1991-2005
    • Consumer Concern about Caffeine Consumption
    • Consumers Are in an Overall Health and Wellness Revolution
    • Is Organic an Important Positioning for Tea Consumers?
    • To Some, Organic Labeling Is a Plus
    • Education Levels Higher for Organic Shoppers
    • Lower-Income Shoppers Have Many Unmet Needs
    • Lower-Income Micro Segments
    • Get Inside the Shoppers Mind

  • Tea Consumers in America
    • Tea Drinking Is Here and Growing
    • Simmons Consumer Survey
    • Interpreting the data
    • Tea and RTD Usage Levels
    • Table 7-2 Percentage Who Use Tea and RTD Tea, by Product Type and Brand
    • Most Households Report Using Two Servings a Tea Daily
    • Table 7-3 Percentage of U.S. Households Who Use Specified Number of Tea Servings per Day
    • Taking a Closer Look at RTD Iced Tea Users
    • Table 7-4 Demographic Indicators Favoring Various Types of RTD
    • Iced Tea
    • Users of Iced Tea Mix
    • Table 7-5 Demographic Indicators Favoring Various Types of Instant Iced Tea Mix
    • Tea Bags Are Used by Many
    • Table 7-6 Demographic Indicators Favoring Various Types of Tea Bags
    • Some Brands Dominate Certain Parts of the Country
    • Table 7-7 Percentage Who Use Tea and RTD Tea, by Brand and Region
    • Southerners Drink the Most Tea
    • Table 7-8 Percentage of U.S. Households Who Use Specified Number of Tea Servings per Day, by Region

  • Segmenting the Consumer
    • Different Demographic Indicators
    • Table 7-9 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Adults 18- to 24-Years Old Use and Resist
    • Table 7-10 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Adults 25- to 34-Years Old Use and Resist
    • Table 7-11 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Adults 35- to 44-Years Old Use and Resist
    • Younger Baby Boomers Don’t Resist Any Type of Tea
    • Table 7-12 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Adults 45- to 54-Years Old Use and Resist
    • Older Boomers Are a Bit More Picky
    • Table 7-13 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Adults 55- to 64-Years Old Use and Resist
    • Older Tea Users Are Much More Discriminating
    • Table 7-14 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Adults 65- to 74-Years Old Use and Resist
    • Table 7-15 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Adults 75-plus Years Old Use and Resist
    • What Do Women Like . . . and What They Don’t
    • Table 7-16 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Adults Women Use
    • Central Regions Tea Users Are the Most Amicable
    • Table 7-17 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Adults in the Northeast Use and Resist
    • Table 7-18 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Adults in Central United States Use and Resist
    • Don’t Mess with Tea Users in the South and the West
    • Table 7-19 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Adults in the Southeast Use and Resist
    • Table 7-20 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Adults in the Southwest Use and Resist
    • Table 7-21 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Adults in the Pacific United States Use and Resist
    • Segmentation by Race
    • Table 7-22 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What White, Non-Hispanic
    • Adults Resist
    • Table 7-23 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Hispanic Adults Use and Resist
    • Table 7-24 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Black Adults Use and Resist
    • Table 7-25 U.S. Tea and RTD Tea: What Asian Adults Use and Resist

    Chapter 8 New Products and Trends

    • Key Points:
    • Industry Trends
      • What Is Driving New Products and Trends in Tea?
      • Tea Leads in Number of New Beverage Introductions
      • Table 8-1 Total Number of Tea SKUs Introduced to the U.S. Marketplace, July 2006 to June 2007
      • Product Variety Makes It Easier to Reach for Tea
      • Figure 8-2 Bigelow Green Tea with Blueberry
      • Table 8-2: Most Frequently Used Flavors in New Tea Drinks, 2006
      • On a Healthy Note
      • The Science on Tea’s Side
      • Changing the Tea Drinker Stereotype
      • Ethnic Opportunities
      • More and More Places Are Offering Tea
      • More and More Places to Source Tea
      • The Teas of Today and Tomorrow
      • Industry Suppliers See Ample Opportunity in Tea

    • Recent Product Introductions
      • Coca-Cola’s Controversial Tea
      • Figure 8-2 Enviga
      • Other Tea-Based Energy Drinks Enter Marketplace
      • Figure 8-3 BAZZA
      • Figure 8-4 Inko’s White Tea Energy
      • Figure 8-5 Guayaki Yerba Mate
      • Move Over, EGCG: Other Green Tea Components
      • Gender-Specific Tea Products
      • Figure 8-6 Luna Nutritional Iced Tea for Women
      • Figure 8-7 Sipping Beauty Forever Young
      • RTD Tea That’s a Bit More Back-to-Classic
      • Figure 8-8 Snapple Classic Black Teas
      • Figure 8-9 Lipton PureLeaf
      • Figure 8-10 Lipton Tea To Go
      • Making Tea Time, Anytime
      • Figure 8-11 Crystal Light On The Go
      • Figure 8-12 Crystal Light Green Tea
      • Tea Bag Innovations Are Plentiful, Too
      • Figure 8-13 Lipton Pyramid Tea Bags
      • Coffee and Tea Can Live in Harmony
      • Figure 8-14 Tazo Tea Bags
      • Loose Leaf Teas Become More Mainstream
      • Figure 8-15 Organic India Tulsi Tea
      • Figure 8-16 The Republic of Tea
      • Figure 8-17 Rishi Tea
      • More Tea Offerings for Foodservice
      • Plastic vs. Glass for RTD
      • Figure 8-18 Hansen’s Natural Teas in PET Plastic Bottles
      • Unique Forms of Tea
      • Figure 8-19 Delta Blues Iced Tea
      • Spoon Creates a Stir
      • In the End, the Doctor Knows Best
      • Figure 8-20 Dr. Andrew Weil for Tea
      • Figure 8-21 Dr. Andrew Weil for Tea—RTD Cans
      • Non-Beverage Tea Innovations
      • Figure 8-22 Tzu The T-Bar
      • Figure 8-23 Tracy Stern Salon Tea Bath Tea
      • Figure 8-24 Blessed Botanicals Salt of the Earth

    Appendix: Select Marketers’ Contact Information

  • In this report, {{keyword[keywordTextProperty]}} appears {{keyword[keywordCountProperty]}} times. {{searchResults.STATRESULT.SUMMARY.KW[keywordTextProperty]}} appears {{searchResults.STATRESULT.SUMMARY.KW[keywordCountProperty]}} times.

    We were unable to search inside this report.

    Search for an exact word or phrase by placing the word or phrase in quotation marks ("market trend"). Search for different versions or tenses of a word by placing an asterisk at the end of the word (pharma*).

    Please note that your term must be at least three characters long and numbers will be blocked by the # sign.


    (US): 800.298.5294
    (Int): +1.240.747.3095
    Fax: 240.747.3004

    Questions?

    Contact a research specialist

    Live Chat Software