The U.S. Urban Youth Trendsetters Market: Tapping the Power of the Hip-Hop Mindset and Culture

 
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Published Mar 1, 2006 | 224 Pages | Pub ID: LA1119538

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The U.S. Urban Youth Market: Tapping the Power of the Trendsetting Hip-Hop Culture and Lifestyle is an innovative, new Packaged Facts report that analyzes the consumer choices made by the 24 million 15- to 29-year-olds who connect with hip-hop music and affiliate with hip-hop culture. The report conclusively shows why marketers need to view “urban” as a state of mind rather than a geographic place when targeting the $500 billion in purchasing power controlled by hip-hop consumers. It provides groundbreaking hard data on the power of hip-hop culture among millions of young consumers in smaller towns and cities as well as in major metropolitan areas. The report demonstrates the fundamental differences between trendsetting urban youth and others their age when they make decisions in a wide range of areas including fashion, cars, media usage, and entertainment.

The report begins with a chapter establishing the size of the population of urban youth and analyzing various demographic characteristics such as income, education, and race and Hispanic origin. The report then highlights what makes hip-hop consumers different from other young consumers by identifying the core values of hip-hop culture. The next section provides a detailed analysis of how young urban consumers differ from others in their age group when shopping and buying in areas such as apparel, personal care, personal finance, automotive vehicles, and food. Other chapters analyze what hip-hop consumers do with their leisure time and how they use the Internet and other forms of technology. A separate chapter provides an in-depth analysis of media usage by urban youth, including print, television, and radio. The final section identifies key trends emerging in the urban youth market and includes chapters on marketing and advertising strategies, the buying power of urban youth, and strategic trends and opportunities.

Report Methodology
The information in The U.S. Urban Youth Market is based on both primary and secondary research. Primary research involved interviews with experts, public relations and industry analysts in firms that specialize in youth and urban market research. Secondary research entailed data-gathering from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature.

About the Authors
Dr. Robert Brown and Ms. Ruth Washton have written more than 25 Packaged Facts reports analyzing demographic trends and marketing strategies in key consumer segments. Topics have ranged from kids to mature consumers to multicultural groups such as Hispanics and African Americans. Dr. Brown and Ms. Washton have co-authored several Financial Times Business Reports on strategic business issues and have provided market and competitor intelligence studies for clients in a variety of industries. Dr. Brown has a B.S. from Georgetown University and a Ph.D. degree from The George Washington University. Ms. Washton has a B.A from Skidmore College and an M.A. from the State University of New York.

How You Will Benefit from this Report
If your company is interested in understanding and reaching the lucrative urban youth consumer, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight about urban youth consumers not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current demographic profile of the urban youth population. Contributing to that understanding will be a complete analysis of data from published and trade sources, and in-depth examinations of the economic and societal trends that influence the consumer behaviors of this large and influential segment of the population. Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

This report will help:

  • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for urban youth consumers.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for products targeting the urban youth consumer.
  • Advertising agencies to develop messages and images that compel urban youth to purchase these products.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.

Chapter 1 Executive Summary
  • Introduction
    • Background
    • The Evolution of Hip-Hop and the Emergence of the Urban Youth Market

  • Scope and Methodology
    • Market Definition
    • Overview of Report
    • Methodology

  • Demographic Overview
    • Popularity of Hip Hop Declines with Age
    • Population of Young Urban Youth Nears 24 Million
    • Females Strong Force in Urban Youth Population
    • Urban Youth Not Only a Big-City Phenomenon
    • Hip-Hop Consumers Are Disproportionately Black but Most Are Non-Hispanic White
    • Multicultural Hip-Hoppers in Majority in Major Metro Areas
    • Vast Majority of Multicultural Urban Youth Live in Larger Metro Areas

  • Core Values of Hip-Hop Culture
    • “Urban” a Mindset, Not a Geographic Place
    • Hip-Hop Consumers Live for the Moment
    • Money Motivates Young Urban Consumers
    • Non-Conformity Seen as a Key Value
    • High Priority on Searching for New Experiences and Products
    • Older Hip-Hop Consumers Define Selves as Influencers
    • Urban Teens Also Are Influencers
    • Adopting New Styles Unites Hip-Hop Consumers
    • Hip-Hop Consumers Everywhere Focus on Keeping Up with Latest Fashions
    • Teen Hip Hoppers Still Need to Follow the Crowd
    • Tracking and Following Trends Important to Teen Hip Hoppers Wherever
    • They Live

  • Highlights of Consumer Attitudes and Behavior
    • Urban Youth Like to Shop and Buy
    • Brand Awareness High but Brand Loyalty Mixed
    • Fashion Attitudes Reflect Hip-Hop Values
    • Keeping up with Fashion Has High Priority
    • Urban Youth Spend More on Clothes than They Can Afford
    • Designer Labels Attract Young Urban Consumers
    • Young Urban Males Buy More Watches
    • Young Urban Consumers Use More Personal-Care Products
    • Urban Youth View Cars as Attention-Getters
    • SUVs Attract Young Urban Consumers
    • Foreign Cars Get Higher Marks
    • Snacking Important to Urban Youth
    • New Drinks Get the Attention of Young Urban Consumers
    • Young Urban Consumers See Selves as Spenders

  • How Urban Youth Use Leisure Time
    • Urban Male Teens Go Out More
    • Among Older Urban Youth, Females More Likely to Go Out
    • Urban Teens More in Touch with Music Scene
    • Urban Male Teens See Stronger Link between Music and Fashion
    • Urban Youth Major Force among Moviegoers
    • Fast Food Gets Nod from Young Urban Males
    • Multiple Video Products Common in Urban Youth Households
    • Home Audio Products Also More Popular

  • Technology and the Internet
    • Young Urban Males Early Adopters of Electronics Equipment
    • Price Less of an Issue
    • Cell Phones More Common
    • Text Messaging and Internet Access More Widespread
    • Computers Prevail in Households of Older Urban Youth
    • Internet Affects Lifestyle of Urban Youth
    • Young Urban Females Major Users of Internet
    • Urban Youth Prime Targets for E-Mail Marketing

  • Media Usage
    • Young Urban Males More Likely to Value Magazines
    • Urban Youth of All Ages More Hooked on TV
    • Video on Demand Gets High Marks from Urban Youth
    • Urban Youth Choose Many Similar Cable Outlets
    • Cable Tastes of Male Urban Teens Show Differences
    • Radio Major Source of Entertainment for Urban Youth
    • Internet Important Source of Entertainment but Has Less Impact on
    • Traditional Media Use by Urban Youth
    • Online Media Activities Analyzed

  • Marketing and Advertising Trends
    • Young Urban Consumers Positive about Advertising
    • Advertising Works with Urban Youth
    • Hip-Hop Consumers Favorable toward TV Commercials
    • Hip-Hop Consumers Pay Attention to Ads in Movie Theaters
    • Teen Hip-Hop Consumers Less Bothered by Internet Advertising
    • “Urban Marketing” No Longer a Niche Strategy in Youth Market
    • Hip-Hop Themes Geared toward Mainstream Market
    • Mobile Marketing Gains Influence in Urban Youth Market
    • Grassroots Campaigns Remain Vital

  • Size and Growth of the Market
    • Buying Power of Young Urban Consumers Totals $496 Billion
    • Number of Young Urban Consumers Will Grow 4.5% between 2005 and 2010
    • Buying Power Will Total $644 Billion in 2010

  • Trends and Opportunities
    • New Media Accelerate Mainstreaming of Hip-Hop Culture
    • Influence of Hip Hop on Consumer Behavior of Youth Transcends
    • Demographic and Geographic Boundaries
    • Hip-Hop Consumers Prime Customers for Wireless Industry
    • Auto Makers See Profits in Hip Hop
    • Urban Apparel Brands Seize Opportunities to Move Upmarket
    • Jewelry Industry Has More to Gain from Urban Youth Market
    • Thirty-Something Consumers with Hip-Hop Mindset Present Major Opportunities

Section 1 Overview
Chapter 2 Demographic Overview
Size of the Urban Youth Population

  • Popularity of Hip Hop Declines with Age
  • Figure 2-1: Percent of 15- to 29-Year-Olds Who Are Hip-Hop Fans by Age Group
  • Population of Young Urban Youth Nears 24 Million
  • Table 2-1: 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth by Percent in Age Groups
  • Urban Youth in 18- to 24-Year-Old Age Group Form Largest Segment
  • Table 2-2: Percent of 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth by Detailed Age Groups
  • Figure 2-2: Percent of 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth in Key Age Groups
  • Females Strong Force in Urban Youth Population
  • Figure 2-3: Percent of 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth by Gender
  • Hip-Hop Consumers More Prominent in Younger Age Groups
  • Table 2-3: 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth by Age Group and Gender

  • Where Urban Youth Live
    • Urban Youth Not Only a Big-City Phenomenon
    • Table 2-4: Population Distribution of 15- to 29-Year-Olds by Size of Metropolitan Area, Urban Youth vs. Others
    • Urban Youth Most Likely to Live in Northeast
    • Table 2-5: Regional Distribution of 15- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others

  • Social and Economic Indicators
    • Urban Youth More Likely to Be in College
    • Table 2-6: Population Distribution of 18- to 29-Year-Olds by Educational Achievement, Urban Youth vs. Others
    • Figure 2-4: Percent of 15- to 17-Year-Olds Who Say They Would Like to Go to College, Urban Youth vs. Others
    • Urban Youth More Likely than Others Their Age to Be Single
    • Table 2-7: Marital Status of 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others
    • Middle Income Households Less Common
    • Table 2-8: Distribution of 18- to 29-Year-Olds by Household Income, Urban Youth vs. Others
    • Aggregate Income of Young Urban Consumers Totals $382 Billion
    • Table 2-9: Aggregate Income of 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth by Race and Hispanic Origin

  • Race and Hispanic Origin
    • Hip-Hop Consumers Are Disproportionately Black
    • Table 2-10: 15- to 29-Year-Olds by Race and Hispanic Origin, Urban Youth vs. Others
    • Multicultural Hip-Hoppers in Majority in Major Metro Areas
    • Table 2-11: Percent of 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth Living inside and outside Major Metropolitan Areas by Race and Hispanic Origin
    • Vast Majority of Multicultural Urban Youth Live in Larger Metro Areas
    • Table 2-12: Percent of 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth Living inside and outside Top 10 and Top 100 Metropolitan Areas by Race and Hispanic Origin
    • Urban Youth Most Likely to Be Found among African Americans
    • Table 2-13: Leading Urban Youth Segments by Age Group and Race and Hispanic Origin

    Chapter 3 Core Values of Hip-Hop Culture

    • Introduction
    • An Existential View of Life
      • Anxiety and Alienation Mark Hip-Hop Culture
      • Table 3-1: Core Hip-Hop Value: Bravado in the Midst of Angst
      • Hip-Hop Consumers Live for the Moment
      • Table 3-2: Core Hip-Hop Value: Live for the Moment
      • Figure 3-1: 18- to 29-Year-Olds Who Say They Tend to Buy Things on the
      • Spur of the Moment, Hip-Hop-Consumers vs. Others

    • Secular Values
      • Hip-Hop Consumers in Non-Metro Areas Most Likely to Have Secular Orientation
      • Table 3-3: Core Hip-Hop Value: Espouse Secular Values
      • Tolerance Key Value
      • Table 3-4: Core Hip-Hop Value: Show Tolerance

    • Materialism as a Driving Force
      • Money Motivates Young Urban Consumers
      • Figure 3-2: 18- to 29-Year-Olds Who Say Money Is the Best Measure of Success, Hip-Hop Consumers vs. Others
      • Figure 3-3: 15- to 17-Year-Olds Who Say They Want to Be Rich, Hip-Hop Consumers vs. Others
      • Having a Career Has High Priority for Hip-Hop Consumers
      • Table 3-5: Core Hip-Hop Value: Pursue Material Success

    • A Fundamental Values Paradox: Setting Trends while Following Fashion
      • Non-Conformity Seen as a Key Value
      • Table 3-6: Core Hip-Hop Value: Revel in Non-Conformity
      • Figure 3-4: 18- to 29-Year-Olds Who Say They Like to Stand Out in a Crowd, Hip-Hop Consumers vs. Others
      • Hip-Hop Consumers Place High Priority on Searching for New Experiences and Products
      • Table 3-7: Core Hip-Hop Value: Search for New Experiences and Products
      • Older Hip-Hop Consumers Define Selves as Influencers
      • Table 3-8: Core Hip-Hop Value: Be Ready to Influence Others
      • Urban Teens Also Are Influencers
      • Table 3-9: Core Hip-Hop Value: Create a Group of Followers
      • Adopting New Styles Unites Hip-Hop Consumers
      • Table 3-10: Core Hip-Hop Value: Be an Early Adopter
      • Hip-Hop Consumers Everywhere Focus on Keeping Up with Latest Fashions
      • Table 3-11: Core Hip-Hop Value: Follow Fashion
      • Teen Hip Hoppers Still Need to Follow the Crowd
      • Table 3-12: Core Hip-Hop Value: Fit in with Your Peers
      • Tracking and Following Trends Important to Teen Hip Hoppers Wherever They Live
      • Table 3-13: Core Hip-Hop Value: Follow the Latest Trends

    Section 2 Consumer Behavior
    Chapter 4 Highlights of Consumer Attitudes and Behavior

    • Shopping Behavior
      • Urban Youth Like to Shop
      • Table 4-1: Attitudes toward Shopping of 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Figure 4-1: Percent of 18- to 29-Year-Olds Visiting Shopping Mall in Last 4 Weeks, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Urban Youth More Likely to Buy When They Shop
      • Figure 4-2: Percent of 18- to 29-Year-Olds Making Purchase at Department or Discount Store in Last 4 Weeks, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • by Gender
      • Brand Awareness High
      • Table 4-2: Brand Awareness of 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Brand Loyalty Mixed
      • Table 4-3: Brand Loyalty of 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Shopping a Social Event for Young Urban Consumers
      • Table 4-4: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Shopping with Friends, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Low Prices Attract Urban Youth
      • Table 4-5: Impact of Price on Shopping Behavior of 18- to 29-Year-Olds,
      • Urban Youth vs Others by Gender.

    • Fashion
      • Fashion Attitudes Reflect Hip-Hop Values
      • Table 4-6: Clothes and Self-Image of 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Trying New Styles Important
      • Table 4-7: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward New Clothing Styles,
      • Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Keeping up with Fashion Has High Priority
      • Table 4-8: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Fashion, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Urban Youth Spend More on Clothes than They Can Afford
      • Table 4-9: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Shopping for Clothes,
      • Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Designer Labels Attract Young Urban Consumers
      • Table 4-10: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Designer Clothes,
      • Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Urban Youth Buy More Apparel
      • Table 4-11: Percent of 15- to 29-Year-Olds Buying Clothes, Jeans, and
      • Athletic Shoes in Past 12 Months, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Urban Teens Go for Licensed Sports Apparel
      • Figure 4-3: Percent of 15- to 17-Year-Olds Buying Licensed Sports Apparel
      • in Past 12 Months, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Urban Youth Have Distinct Brand Preferences When Buying Jeans
      • Table 4-12: Brands of Jeans Bought in Last 12 Months by 18- to 29-Year-Old Males, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Table 4-13: Brands of Jeans Bought in Last 12 Months by 18- to 29-Year-Old Females, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Table 4-14: Brands of Jeans Bought in Last 12 Months by 15- to 17-Year-Old Males, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Table 4-15: Brands of Jeans Bought in Last 12 Months by 15- to 17-Year-Old Females, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Basketball Shoes Top Category of Athletic Shoes for Young Urban Males
      • Table 4-16: Type of Sneakers/Athletic/Sports Shoes Bought in Last 12
      • Months by 18- to 29- Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Table 4-17: Type of Sneakers/Athletic/Sports Shoes Bought in Last 12
      • Months by 15- to 17- Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Young Urban Males More Likely to Pay for Own Clothes
      • Table 4-18: Clothes Shopping Patterns of 15- to 17-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Young Urban Males Buy More Watches
      • Table 4-19: Percent of 15- to 29-Year-Olds Buying Watches for Self or
      • Others in Last 12 Months, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Figure 4-4: Percent of 15- to 29-Year-Olds Buying Watches for Self in Last
      • 12 Months, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender

    • Personal Care
      • Urban Teens Like the Glamorous Look
      • Table 4-20: Attitudes toward Personal Care of 15- to 17-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Young Urban Males Use More Personal-Care Products
      • Table 4-21: Use of Personal-Care Products by 15- to 29-Year-Old Males, Urban Youth vs. Others by Age Group
      • Young Urban Females Show Distinct Patterns in Use of Personal-Care Products
      • Table 4-22: Use of Personal-Care Products by 15- to 29-Year-Old Females, Urban Youth vs. Others by Age Group

    • Automotive
      • Urban Youth Get Sense of Freedom from Driving
      • Table 4-23: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Driving, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Urban Youth View Cars as Attention-Getters
      • Table 4-24: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Self-Image and Automobiles, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Looks Most Important When Buying a Car
      • Table 4-25: Reasons 18- to 29-Year-Olds Buy a Car, Urban Youth vs.
      • Others by Gender
      • Vehicle Safety Not a Major Concern for Urban Youth
      • Table 4-26: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Safety, Urban Youth vs.
      • Others by Gender
      • SUVs Attract Young Urban Consumers
      • Table 4-27: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward SUVs and Luxury
      • Vehicles, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Young Urban Females More Likely to Buy New Cars
      • Table 4-28: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward New Cars, Urban Youth
      • vs. Others by Gender
      • Foreign Cars Get Higher Marks
      • Table 4-29: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Foreign Cars, Urban
      • Youth vs. Others by Gender

    • Attitudes toward Food
      • Healthy Eating Has Low Priority
      • Table 4-30: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Healthy Eating, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Dieting Not a Concern
      • Table 4-31: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Dieting, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Snacking Important to Urban Youth
      • Table 4-32: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Snacking, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • New Drinks Get the Attention of Young Urban Consumers
      • Table 4-33: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward New Foods, Urban
      • Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Young Urban Females Like Prepared Foods
      • Table 4-34: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Prepared Foods, Urban Youth vs. Others

    • Personal Finance
      • Urban Youth See Selves as Spenders
      • Table 4-35: Selected Attitudes toward Personal Finances of 15- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender and Age Group
      • Table 4-36: Attitudes toward Saving of 15- to 17-Year-Olds, Urban Youth
      • vs. Others by Gender
      • Young Urban Females Have High Regard for Financial Management Skills
      • Table 4-37: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Financial Management Skills, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Urban Teens Receive Higher Allowances
      • Table 4-38: Financial Profile of 15- to 17-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Young Urban Consumers Attracted to Debit Cards
      • Table 4-39: Use of Banking Services by 18- to 29-year-olds, Urban Youth vs. Others

    Chapter 5 How Urban Youth Use Leisure Time

    • Going Out
      • Urban Male Teens Go Out More
      • Table 5-1: 15- to 17-Year-Olds’ Attitudes about Going Out, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Among Older Urban Youth, Females More Likely to Go Out
      • Table 5-2: Attendance at Live Entertainment Events by 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Urban Youth More Intensely Involved with Music
      • Urban Teens More in Touch with Music Scene
      • Table 5-3: Attitudes of 15- to 17-Year-Olds toward Music, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Urban Male Teens See Stronger Link between Music and Fashion
      • Figure 5-1: Percent of 15- to 17-Year-Olds Who Say Their Style of Clothes Reflects Their Taste in Music, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Table 5-4: Percent of 18- to 29-Year-Olds Owning Portable Audio Products, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Urban Youth Major Force among Moviegoers
      • Table 5-5: Frequency of Movie Attendance by 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Table 5-6: When Movies Are Usually Seen by 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Male Teens More Likely to Go to Movies
      • Table 5-7: Frequency of Movie Attendance by 15- to 17-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Table 5-8: When Movies Are Usually Seen by 15- to 17-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • TV Commercials for Movies Get Urban Teens’ Attention
      • Table 5-9: Reasons for Seeing a Movie of 15- to 17-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Urban Youth Have Distinct Tastes in Movies
      • Table 5-10: Favorite Movie Genres of 15- to 17-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Table 5-11: Favorite Movie Genres of 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Fast Food Gets Nod from Young Urban Males
      • Figure 5-2: Percent of 18- to 29-Year-Olds Going to Fast Food and Drive-in Restaurants, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Table 5-12: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Fast Food, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Table 5-13: Percent of 15- to 17-Year-Olds Going to Fast Food and Drive-In Restaurants, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender

    • Home Entertainment
      • Video Games Get Nod from Older Hip-Hop Consumers
      • Figure 5-3: Percent of 15- to 17-Year-Olds Saying They Really Enjoy
      • Playing Video Games, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Table 5-14: Percent of 18- to 29-Year-Olds Owning or Using Video Games, Urban Youth vs. Others by Age Group
      • Multiple Video Products Common in Urban Youth Households
      • Figure 5-4: Percent of 18- to 29-Year-Old Households with Three or More
      • TV Sets, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Figure 5-15: Household Ownership of Video Products by 18- to 29-Year-
      • Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Home Audio Products Also More Popular
      • Table 5-16: Ownership of Home Audio Products by 18- to 29-Year-Olds,
      • Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender

    Chapter 6 Technology and the Internet

    • Urban Youth and Technology
      • Urban Youth Keep up with Technology
      • Table 6-1: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Technology, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Urban Youth Influence Friends’ Choice of Electronics Equipment
      • Table 6-2: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Technology, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Young Urban Males Early Adopters of Electronics Equipment
      • Table 6-3: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Buying New Electronics Equipment, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Price Less of an Issue
      • Table 6-4: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Price When Buying New Electronics Equipment, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender

    • Mobile Media Platforms
      • Cell Phones More Common
      • Table 6-5: Percent of 15- to 29-Year-Olds Owning Cell Phones, Urban Youth vs. Others by Age Group and Gender
      • Text Messaging More Widespread
      • Figure 6-1: Percent of 15- to 29-Year-Olds with Text Messaging on Cell Phones, Urban Youth vs. Others by Age Group and Gender
      • Cell-Phone Internet Access Also More Common
      • Figure 6-2: Percent of 15- to 29-Year-Olds with Internet Access on Cell Phones, Urban Youth vs. Others by Age Group and Gender
      • Other Cell Phone Services Also More Heavily Used
      • Table 6-6: Use of Cell Phone Services by 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Table 6-7: Use of Cell Phone Services of 15- to 17-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others

    • Urban Youth and the Internet
      • Computers Prevail in Households of Older Urban Youth
      • Table 6-8: Ownership and Use of Computers by 15- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Age Group and Gender
      • Young Urban Females Turn to the Internet More
      • Table 6-9: Use of the Internet by 15- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs.
      • Others by Age Group and Gender
      • Internet Affects Lifestyle of Younger and Older Urban Youth in Different Ways
      • Table 6-10: Impact of Internet on Lifestyles of 15- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Choices of Web Sites Differ for Urban Teens
      • Table 6-11: Popular Web Sites of 15- to 17-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs.
      • Others by Gender
      • Table 6-12: Popular Web Sites of 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs.
      • Others by Gender
      • Young Urban Females Major Users of Internet
      • Table 6-13: Online Activities of 15- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Urban Youth Prime Targets for E-Mail Marketing
      • Table 6-14: Impact of Internet on Shopping Behavior of 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Female Urban Teens Buy Online
      • Figure 6-3: Percent of 15- to 29-Year-Olds Placing Any Internet Order in
      • Last 30 Days, Urban Youth vs. Others by Age Group and Gender

    Chapter 7 Media Usage

    • Print Media
      • Young Urban Males Trust Newspapers
      • Table 7-1: Attitudes toward Newspapers of 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban
      • Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Young Urban Males More Likely to Value Magazines
      • Table 7-2: Attitudes toward Magazines of 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Young Urban Males Read Mostly the Same Magazines as Other 18- to 29-
      • Year-Old Males
      • Table 7-3: Most Popular Magazines of 18- to 29-Year-Old Males, Urban
      • Youth vs. Others
      • Table 7-4: Similarities and Differences in Magazines Popular with 18- to 29-Year-Old Males, Urban Youth and Others
      • Greater Differences in Magazine Choices of Urban Females
      • Table 7-5: Most Popular Magazines of 18- to 29-Year-Old Females, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Table 7-6: Similarities and Differences in Magazines Popular with 18- to 29-Year-Old Females, Urban Youth and Others

    • Television
      • Urban Youth of All Ages More Hooked on TV
      • Table 7-7: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Video on Demand Gets High Marks from Urban Youth
      • Table 7-8: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Pay per View and Video on Demand, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Urban Youth Watch More Primetime Network TV
      • Table 7-9: Primetime Network TV Viewing Habits of 18- to 29-Year-Olds,
      • Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender.
      • Table 7-10: Networks Watched by 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Table 7-11: Showtypes Watched by 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Urban Youth Choose Many Similar Cable Outlets
      • Table 7-12: Most Popular Cable TV Services of 18- to 29-Year-Old Males, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Table 7-13: Similarities and Differences in Cable TV Services Popular with 18- to 29-Year-Old Males, Urban Youth and Others
      • Cable Choices Also Overlap among 18- to 29-Year-Old Urban Females
      • Table 7-14: Most Popular Cable TV Services of 18- to 29-Year-Old Females, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Table 7-15: Similarities and Differences in Cable TV Services Popular with
      • 18- to 29-Year-Old Females, Urban Youth and Others
      • Urban Teen Cable Tastes Show Differences
      • Table 7-16: Most Popular Cable TV Services of 15- to 17-Year-Old Males, Urban Youth vs. Others.
      • Table 7-17: Similarities and Differences in Cable TV Services Popular with
      • 15- to 17-Year-Old Males, Urban Youth and Others
      • Table 7-18: Most Popular Cable TV Services of 15- to 17-Year-Old Females, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Table 7-19: Similarities and Differences in Cable TV Services Popular with
      • 15- to 17-Year-Old Females, Urban Youth and Others

    • Radio
      • Radio Major Source of Entertainment for Urban Youth
      • Table 7-20: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Radio, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Urban Youth Listen to Radio More
      • Figure 7-1: Percent of 18- to 29-Year-Olds Listening to Radio in Past Week, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Radio Format Choices Include Surprises
      • Table 7-21: Most Popular Radio Formats of 18- to 29-Year-Old Males, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Table 7-22: Most Popular Radio Formats of 18- to 29-Year-Old Females, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Table 7-23: Most Popular Radio Formats of 15- to17-Year-Old Males, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Table 7-24: Most Popular Radio Formats of 15- to 17-Year-Old Females,
      • Urban Youth vs. Others

    • Impact of the Internet on Media Usage
      • Internet Important Source of Entertainment but Has Less Impact on
      • Traditional Media Use by Urban Youth
      • Table 7-25: Impact of the Internet on Media Usage of 18- to 29-Year-Olds, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Online Media Activities Analyzed
      • Table 7-26: Online Media Activities in Last 30 Days of 18- to 29-Year-Old Males, Urban Youth vs. Others
      • Table 7-27: Online Media Activities in Last 30 Days of 18- to 29-Year-Old Females, Urban Youth vs. Others

    • Media Trends
      • Mobile Media Platforms Target Urban Youth
      • Hip-Hop Consumers Continue to Attract Media Interest

    Section 3 Key Market Trends
    Chapter 8 Marketing and Advertising Trends

    • Receptivity of Urban Youth to Advertising
      • Young Urban Consumers Positive about Advertising
      • Table 8-1: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Advertising, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Ads More Likely to Succeed with Urban Youth
      • Table 8-2: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Advertising, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Outdoor Advertising Noticed by Urban Youth
      • Table 8-3: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Outdoor Advertising,
      • Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Hip-Hop Consumers Favorable toward TV Commercials
      • Table 8-4: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Television Advertising, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Channel Surfing during Commercials More Common
      • Table 8-5: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Watching Commercials, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Hip-Hop Consumers Pay Attention to Ads in Movie Theaters
      • Table 8-6: Attitudes of 18- to 29-Year-Olds toward Ads in Movie Theaters, Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender
      • Teen Hip-Hop Consumers Less Bothered by Internet Advertising
      • Table 8-7: Percent of 15- to 17-Year-Olds Saying Internet Advertising
      • “Not at All Useful,” Urban Youth vs. Others by Gender and Type of Ad

    • Marketing and Advertising Trends
      • “Urban Marketing” No Longer a Niche Strategy in Youth Market
      • Hip-Hop Themes Geared toward Mainstream Market
      • Product Placement Rises to New Heights in Hip-Hop Consumer World
      • Mobile Marketing Gains Influence in Urban Youth Market
      • Grassroots Campaigns Remain Vital
      • DJs Become Marketers
      • Reebok Turns to Hip Hop to Revive Brand in Youth Market

    Chapter 9 Size and Growth of the Market

    • Size of the Market
      • Buying Power Used as Measure of Urban Youth Market
      • Buying Power of Young Urban Consumers Totals $496 Billion
      • Table 9-1: Buying Power of 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth by Age Group and Race and Hispanic Origin, 2005
      • Figure 9-1: Buying Power of 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth by Race and Hispanic Origin

    • Projected Growth
      • Demographic Trends to Affect Urban Youth Market Growth
      • Table 9-2: Growth in Population of 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth by Age Group and Race and Hispanic Origin, 2005-2010
      • Figure 9-2: Growth in Population of 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth,
      • Non-Hispanic White vs. Multicultural, 2005-2010
      • Number of Young Urban Consumers Will Grow 4.5% between 2005 and 2010
      • Table 9-3: Growth in Population of 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2005-2010
      • Table 9-4: Percent Growth in Population of 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2005-2010
      • Figure 9-3: Percent of Total Growth in 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth
      • Buying Power by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2005-2010
      • Buying Power Will Total $644 Billion in 2010
      • Table 9-5: Buying Power of 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth by Age Group and Race and Hispanic Origin, 2010
      • Table 9-6: Growth in Buying Power of 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth by
      • Age Group and Race and Hispanic Origin, 2005 vs. 2010
      • Table 9-7: Buying Power of 15- to 29-Year-Old Urban Youth by Age Group and Race and Hispanic Origin, 2005 vs. 2010

    Chapter 10 Trends and Opportunities

    • Strategic Trends
      • “Mainstream” Means More than Just “Suburban”
      • New Media Accelerate Mainstreaming of Hip-Hop Culture
      • Influence of Hip Hop on Consumer Behavior of Youth Transcends
      • Demographic and Geographic Boundaries

    • Emerging Opportunities
      • Hip-Hop Consumers Prime Customers for Wireless Industry
      • Auto Makers See Profits in Hip Hop
      • Urban Apparel Brands Seize Opportunities to Move Upmarket
      • Jewelry Industry Has More to Gain from Urban Youth Market
      • Thirty-Something Consumers with Hip-Hop Mindset Present Major Opportunities
      • Table 10-1: Fashion Attitudes of 30- to 39-Year-Olds, Urban vs. Others
      • Table 10-2: Apparel Purchases by 30- to 39-Year-Olds, Urban vs. Others by Gender
      • Figure 10-1: Percent of 30- to 39-Year-Olds Buying Athletic Shoes and Jeans in the Last 12 Months, Urban vs. Others by Gender
      • Figure 10-2: Percent of 30- to 39-Year-Olds Purchasing Watches in the Last 12 Months, Urban vs. Others by Gender
      • Table 10-3: Use of Personal-Care Products by 30- to 39-Year-Old Males, Urban vs. Others
      • Table 10-4: Use of Personal-Care Products by 30- to 39-Year-Old Females, Urban vs. Others
      • Table 10-5: Profile of 30- to 39-Year-Old Automotive Consumers, Urban vs. Others

    Appendix: Addresses of Selected U.S. Urban Youth Market Resources