U.S. Market for Fish and Seafood, with a Focus on Fresh

Jan 1, 2009
175 Pages - Pub ID: LA1737415
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An increasingly health-conscious public eager for heart healthy ‘happy fat’ and low calorie meals has made seafood one of the fastest-growing food categories. The United States represents one of the most important seafood markets in the world, both from a consumption and catch perspective.

Many factors are influencing the growth and direction of the seafood market, not the least of which include a push toward sustainability in the production and retailing of fresh seafood and shellfish and an effort by the industry to educate consumers on the safety of seafood products and the ease of cooking and preparation.

U.S. Market for Fish and Seafood, with a Focus on Fresh, a new report from Packaged Facts, provides an in-depth look at the $20 billion U.S. seafood industry with an emphasis on the largest segment, fresh fish and shellfish. The report tracks key trends affecting U.S. seafood supply and demand, and provides a comprehensive analysis of the main driving forces within the U.S. seafood industry, including the import/export supply chain, consumer attitudes and emerging public opinion, competitor analysis, environmental data. Using various sources, we also evaluate the state of the market and offer likely developments and future trends.

U.S. Market for Fish and Seafood, with a Focus on Fresh makes important predictions and recommendations regarding the future of the seafood industry, and pinpoints ways current and prospective market participants can capitalize on current trends and spearhead new ones. No other market research report provides both the comprehensive analysis and extensive data that this study offers across following segments:

  • The Products.
  • The Market (including market size, composition, projected market growth, future trends, and international perspective).
  • The Marketers (market structure plus detailed marketer and brand shares).
  • Sales and Distribution Channels (extensive discussion of foodservice and retail venues).
  • Marketing and New Product Trends (e.g., foodservice/retail cross-over and number of product launches by trend/type).
  • The Consumer (demographics, attitudes and lifestyle trends).

The report includes extensive information from several sources—including many interviews with key industry representatives - as well as dozens of practical, easy-to-read charts, tables and graphs, all of which are thoroughly examined in light of the many dynamic trends at play in this rapidly shifting market.

Read an excerpt from this report below.

Chapter 1: Executive Summary
Scope of Report
Report Methodology
The U.S. Seafood Market
Fresh and Frozen Seafood Accounts for 77% of Fishery Products
Table 1-1: U.S. Annual Per Capita Consumption of Commercial Fish and Shellfish, 1997-2007
Filet and Steaks Consumption Flat; Breaded Fish Reverses Decline
Table 1-2: Production of Value-Added Fish Products, in Thousand Pounds 2002-2007
Reduction in Restaurant Traffic Reduces Seafood Consumption
Average Consumer Makes Four Trips a Year to the Seafood Department
Factors That Increase Seafood Consumption
Health Benefits of Seafood Encourages Consumption
Aquaculture May Lower Prices and Increase Availability
Country of Origin Labeling May Assure Consumers of Safety
Barriers to Seafood Consumption
Food Safety Concerns Keep Some Americans From Seafood
Consumers Not Educated in Seafood Preparation
Most Popular Species of Fresh Seafood
Table 1-3: Top Ten Species by Annual Consumption (in pounds, per person) 2003-2007
Sustainability
Economic Downturn Affecting Seafood Consumption
Table 1-4: U.S. Annual Per Capita Consumption of Fish And Shellfish (in pounds), 2003-2007 (actual), 2008-2012 (estimated)
The Consumer
One Third of Consumers Never Buy Fresh Seafood
Northeastern and Pacific Urban Dwellers Consume More Fresh Seafood
Typical Fresh Seafood Consumers are Middle Aged, Affluent, and Married
Fresh Seafood Consumers are Health Conscious
Table 1-5: Health Attitudes for Seafood, Hamburger, and Chicken Consumers
Retail Trends
Supermarket Sales of Seafood Up Slightly in 2007
Slightly Fewer Supermarkets Offering Fresh Seafood
Frozen Seafood Sales Slowed in 2008
Table 1-6: Frozen Seafood Sales, 2008 vs. 2007
More Than Half of Seafood Consumers Shop at Wal-Mart
Foodservice Seafood Trends
Red Lobster Leads Seafood Restaurant Chain Sales
Seafood Chains Hit Hard By Consumer Spending Decreases
Top Seafood Foodservice Distributors
Red Chamber and Trident Seafoods are Top Seafood Companies ..
Imports and Exports
Imports
Seafood Imports Were a Record $13.7 Billion in 2007
Table 1-7: Edible Fishery Products Imports 2003-2007
Exports
U.S. Exports More than 80 Percent of Catches
Table 1-8: Edible Fishery Products Exports 2003-2007
Domestic Seafood Production
Pacific Coast Dominates U.S. Fishery Landings
Trends and Opportunities
Better-for-you Products
Prepared Seafood Dishes For Convenience
Increasing Consumer Demand for Eco Labeling and Health Information
Supermarkets Will Be Eateries
Asian and Hispanic Population Growth May Boost Seafood Consumption
Maturing Baby Boomers Drive Growth in Seafood


Chapter 2: The Market
Highlights
Market Overview
Market Size of Seafood in the United States
Seafood Consumption Declined Slightly in 2007
Table 2-1: U.S. Annual Per Capita Consumption of Commercial Fish and Shellfish, 1997-2007
Seafood Consumption Far Less Than Other Protein Sources
Figure 2-1: Average U.S. Protein Consumption, 2000-2007
Fresh and Frozen Seafood Accounts for 77% of Fishery Products
Table 2-2: Value of Fishery Products, 2003-2007
Consumer Spending on Meat, Poultry, Fish and Eggs
Table 2-3: Average Annual Consumer Food Expenditures: Total vs. Meats, Poultry, Fish and Eggs, 2002-2006 (in dollars)
Consumption of Filets and Steaks Rising
Table 2-4: Per Capita Consumption of Filets and Steaks, and Sticks and Portions 2000-2007
Production of Fish Sticks and Portions Up (Temporarily), Breaded Shrimp Down
Table 2-5: Production of Value-Added Fish Products, in Thousand Pounds 2002-2007
Grocery Seafood Sales Grow Slower Than Other Items
Table 2-6: Changes in Grocery Item Sales - October 2008 vs. October 2007 .
Seventy Percent of Seafood Consumed in Restaurants
Consumers Cut Back on Eating Out
Average Consumer Makes Four Trips a Year to the Seafood Department
Alaska Pollock is Most Valuable Seafood Fillet
Table 2-7: Production of Top 10 Fresh and Frozen Fillets by Species, 2003-2007
Canned Product Prices and Supply Remain Steady
Table 2-8: U.S. Production of Canned Fishery Products, 2006 and 2007
Market Drivers in Seafood Consumption
Growing Awareness of Health Benefits
The “Japanese Factor”
What About Fish Oil Supplements?
Lent is Christmas for the Seafood Industry
Aquaculture May Lower Prices and Increase Availability
Figure 2-3: Global Fisheries and Aquaculture Production, 1980-2010
Figure 2-4: U.S. Aquaculture Production, 2006
Country of Origin Labeling May Assure Consumers of Safety
Frozen vs. Fresh: Advantages and Drawbacks
Farmed vs. Wild
Organic Seafood Growing 20% Annually
What is Organic Seafood Anyway?
Convenience Packaging
Barriers to Seafood Consumption
Food Safety Concerns Keep Some Americans From Seafood
Government and Retailers Promote Safety, But Not Easing Fears
Consumers Not Educated in Seafood Preparation
Economic Factors Affecting Seafood Consumption
Consumers Squeezed in 2008
Table 2-9: Percent Changes in Food Price Indexes, 2004 through 2009
Table 2-10: Percent Changes in Consumer Indexes, September 2004 through September 2008
Restaurants Face Triple Threat
Some Seafood is Considered an Unnecessary Luxury
Is Seafood Recession Proof?
Canned Seafood Making a (Brief) Comeback
Table 2-11: Sales of Shelf Stable Seafood, 2008
Fresh Seafood Consumption
Most Popular Species of Fresh Seafood
Table 2-13: Top Ten Species by Annual Consumption (in pounds, per person) 2003-2007
Shrimp Is The Most Popular Seafood
Figure 2-5: Shrimp Imports by Major Exporter, by Volume 2007
Figure 2-6: Shrimp Exports by Major Importer, by Volume 2007
Tuna: Mercury Concerns Driving Down Consumption
Cod: Quickly Disappearing
Tilapia: Farmed Species Continues to Grow
Pollock: The All-purpose Fish
Figure 2-7: Seafood Consumption Change, 2002-2007 (percent)
Salmon: Health Benefits Outweigh Risks
Sustainability
Table 2-8: Number of Marine Stewardship Council-labeled Fishery Products
The Sushi Industry
Sushi popularity broadens amid health concerns
Consumer Cards Promote Sustainable Sushi
Competitive Profiles: Sushi Without Guilt
Advertising and Promotion
Eco Labeling Can Be a Marketing Tool - If it’s Clear
NGOs Try To Prevent Label Confusion
Blogs and Social Networking
Key Seafood Marketing Events
Market Forecast for Seafood
Size of the U.S. Seafood Market
Table 2-13: U.S. Supply of Edible Fishery Products, by Weight, 2003-2013 ..
Table 2-14: U.S. Domestic Fishery Products, by Value, 2003-2013
Fresh and Frozen Seafood Consumption Will Decline Through 2009
Table 2-15: U.S. Annual Per Capita Consumption of Fish And Shellfish (in pounds), 2003-2007 (actual), 2008-2012 (estimated)
Table 2-16: U.S. Annual Per Capita Consumption of Fishery Items (in pounds), 2003-2007 (actual), 2008-2012 (estimated)


Chapter 3: The Consumer
Highlights
Simmons Data - What They Are …
One Third of Consumers Never Buy Fresh Seafood
Table 3-1: Consumer Frequency of Use of Grocery Departments and Services
Fresh Seafood Consumers Spend Less Overall
Table 3-2: Grocery Expenditures: Weekly Overall, Fresh Seafood Consumers, Hamburger Consumers
Table 3-3: Seafood and Hamburger Purchase, by Household Size
Who Eats Fresh Seafood?
Northeastern and Pacific Urban Dwellers Consume More Fresh Seafood
Figure 3-1: Regional Seafood Consumption
Figure 3-2: U.S. Seafood Consumption By Metro Market Size
Fresh Seafood Consumers: Middle Aged, Affluent, Married
Figure 3-3: Fresh Seafood Consumption, by Age
Figure 3-4: Fresh Seafood Consumption, by Income
Figure 3-5: Fresh Seafood Consumption, by Marital Status
Fresh Seafood Consumers are Health Conscious
Table 3-4: Health Attitudes for Seafood, Hamburger, and Chicken Consumers
Majority of Seafood Eaters Enjoy Cooking, But…
Table 3-5: Percentage of Seafood Eaters Who Enjoy Cooking
Seafood Eaters Frequent Fast Food Restaurants
Table 3-6: Percentage of Seafood Eaters Who Dine Out
Table 3-7: Protein Consumption Trends, 2004-2008
Pescatarians Unite
Food Safety Fears Not Keeping Many Consumers From Seafood
Table 3-8: Changes in Food Purchasing Habits Out of Safety Concerns


Chapter 4: Retail and Foodservice Channels
Highlights
Retail Sales of Fish and Seafood
Supermarket Sales of Seafood Up Slightly in 2007
Drop Off In Restaurant Traffic Could Benefit Some Seafood Retailers
Grocers Predict Growing Seafood Sales
Seafood is a Small Part of Grocer’s Pie, But Has High Profits
Fewer Supermarkets Offering Fresh Seafood
Table 4-1: Availability of Departments and Services in Supermarkets, 2005-2008
Salmon and Shellfish Most Popular Fresh Items; Crab Most Expensive
Table 4-2: Seafood Purchases at Supermarkets: Penetration and Spending by Household in 2007
Fresh and Frozen Seafood Sales
Fresh Seafood Sales Down at Conventional Supermarkets
Frozen Seafood Saw an Average 5% Annual Growth 2002-2007
Frozen Seafood Sales Slowed in 2008
Table 4-3: Frozen Seafood Sales, 2008 vs. 2007
Table 4-4: Frozen Seafood Usage, 2004-2008
Shrimp is Most Popular Frozen Seafood
Figure 4-1: Types of Frozen Seafood Used
Gorton’s is the Top Frozen Seafood Brand
Figure 4-2: Most Popular Frozen Seafood Brands
Supermarket Seafood Marketing Trends
More Than Half of Seafood Consumers Shop at Wal-Mart
Figure 4-1: Top Supermarkets for Seafood
Wal-Mart, Costco Win, Traditional Supermarkets Lose
Consumers Paying More For Private Label Seafood But Not Buying More
Merchandising Seafood as a Stand-alone Department
The Return of the Fishmonger
Consumers Eat Seafood in the Store
More Retailers Embracing Sustainability
Table 4-5: Greenpeace’s Top Five Sustainable Supermarkets for Seafood
Retailer Profile: Whole Foods Market
The Gold Standard in Seafood Sustainability
Trouble Ahead for Whole Foods?
Supermarkets Train Consumers to Prepare Seafood
Foodservice Seafood Trends
Foodservice Dining Trends
Sushi at 7-Eleven
Quick Serve Restaurants Growing
Eating Healthy
Sustainability a Growing Issue For Restaurant Operators
Calorie and Fat Labeling on Menus May Boost Seafood Consumption
Table 4-6: Nutrition Comparison of Dinners at Macaroni Grill
Seafood Chains
Red Lobster Leads Seafood Restaurant Chain Sales
Figure 4-3: Leading U.S. Seafood Restaurant Chains
Casual Dining Restaurants
Red Lobster is Second Most Popular Casual Dining Chain
Table 4-7: Most Popular U.S. Restaurant Chains 2008
Leaner Times For Casual Dining Seafood Restaurants
Figure 4-4: Casual Dining Seafood Chains
McCormick & Schmick’s: Boom Times Over for Now
Fast Food Fish
The Seafood QSR Segment is Relatively Tiny and Slow-Growing
Table 4-8: QSR Sales Growth by Segment, 2004-2006
Figure 4-5: Market Share of QSR Segments, 2006
Figure 4-6: Market Share of QSR Seafood Restaurants, 2007
Long John Silver’s Is King Of QSR Seafood
Table 4-9: Fast Food Visited in Last 30 Days
Table 4-10: Most Popular Fast Food Seafood Chains - 2008
Fast Food Burger Chains Still Rule
Table 4-11: Top Ten Fast Food Chains, by Consumer Selection, 2008
Chefs Concerned About Sustainability; Consumers Less So
The Seafood Supply Chain: Wholesalers and Distributors
A Frenzy of Mergers and Acquisitions
Top Seafood Companies
Table 4-12: Top 10 U.S. Seafood Companies in 2007 (by sales)
Top Seafood Foodservice Distributors
Table 4-13: Leading U.S. Foodservice Distributors, by Sales, 2007


Chapter 5: Supply and Trade
Highlights
Imports and Exports
Import Shares are Highest for Fish and Shellfish
Figure 5-1: Import Shares by Volume, 2000-2005
Seafood Imports Were a Record $13.7 Billion in 2007
Table 5-1: Edible Fishery Products Imports 2003-2007
Table 5-2: Edible Fishery Products Imports, by Principal Items (Volume) 2003-2007
Table 5-3: Edible Fishery Products Imports, by Principal Items (Value) 2003-2007
Imports: Shrimp Still Dominates, Though Slipping
Table 5-4: Leading U.S. Seafood Imports
Figure 5-2: U.S. Imports from Major Areas by Volume, 2007
Figure 5-3: U.S. Imports from Major Exporters, by Volume, 2007
Exports: U.S. Exports More than 80 Percent of Catches
Table 5-5: Edible Fishery Products Exports 2003-2007
Table 6-6: Leading U.S. Seafood Exports
Asia is the Largest Trading Region With U.S
Figure 5-4: U.S. Exports to Major Areas, by Volume 2007
Figure 5-5: U.S. Exports to Major Importers, by Volume 2007
Into China and Back Again
Crabs, Scallops and Salmon Most Valuable U.S. Commercial Species
Figure 5-6: U.S. Commercial Landings 2004 and 2007, Top 10 Species (in millions of dollars)
Pacific Coast Dominates U.S. Fishery Landings
Table 5-7: U.S. Domestic Commercial Landings by Region, by Volume
Table 5-8: U.S. Domestic Commercial Landings by Region, by Value
Alaska Is The Seafood State
Figure 5-7: U.S. Domestic Commercial Landings by Region, 2007 (million USD)
Figure 5-8: Fishery Landings at Major U.S. Ports, 2007 (million USD)
How the Economy Affects Industry and Prices
Fuel Costs May Shake Out Independent U.S. Fishers
Grain Prices Dry Up Catfish Farms
Long Term Help For Fishers
Environmental Issues
Overfishing: 30% of World’s Fish Stocks Overexploited
From Overfishing to an Acceptable Level of Fishing
Effects of Hurricanes on Gulf Coast Fisheries


Chapter 6: Trends and Opportunities
Highlights
Five Consumer Expectations
Better-for-you Products
Convenience Trend Means More Deli Purchases
Increasing Consumer Demand for Eco Labeling and Health Information
Figure 6-1: Perceived Value of a USDA Organic Label
Consumers Must Trust Labels
Turning Grocery Stores into Restaurants
Changing Demographics Represent a Growth Opportunity
Asian and Hispanic Populations Growing at Faster Rate
Table 6-1: U.S. Population Change, by Race or Ethnicity, 2000 to 2004
Asians and Hispanics Consume More Seafood
Maturing Baby Boomers to Drive Growth in Seafood
Figure 6-2: Projected Protein Source Consumption Change
Sustainability is Paramount
Seafood Industry Will Continue to Drive Sustainability
Players Throughout the Supply Chain are Aware of Sustainability Issues
Figure 6-3: Percent of Chain Restaurants Using Sustainable Seafood in 2007 and 2012
Figure 6-4: Percent of Retailers Using Sustainable Seafood in 2007 and 2012
Figure 6-5: Percent of Wholesalers Using Sustainable Seafood in 2007 and 2012
Competitive Profiles: EcoFish and FishChoice
Aquaculture
Government Promotes Sustainability
Alternatives to Farming: Safer But Less Controllable


Appendix: Addresses of Selected Marketers

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