The U.S. Market for Organic Foods and Beverages: Volume 1 in the series

 
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Published May 1, 2003 | 228 Pages | Pub ID: LA833303

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Already a $9 billion market, organic foods and beverages are the fastest-growing categories of the food industry. Driven by increased consumer awareness of the nexus between healthy eating and health, and buoyed by federal regulations that provide clear guidance on how to label products, the organic industry has evolved from a locally farmed, locally shopped niche to a global concern with global U.S.-based food and beverage marketers taking an active role as key players. Old-line food giants such as Kellogg, Kraft, Heinz and General Mills now have a stake in popular brands of organic foods and beverages. And the consumer profile of an organic shopper is changing, as a younger, more ethnically diverse and economically varied audience has begun to seek these products. The U.S. Market for Organic Foods and Beverages, 3rd Edition, offers a comprehensive look at this burgeoning industry, and offers the benefit of quantitative and qualitative analyses buoyed by the insight of top experts in the field.

The U.S. Market for Wellness Foods and Beverages
The U.S. Market for Organic Foods and Beverages is the first volume of Packaged Facts’ new 3-volume market research series, The U.S. Market for Wellness Foods and Beverages. This series is the executive’s guide to the new frontier of wellness oriented food and beverage consumption in this country. Here are expertly analyzed quantitative and qualitative data on market size and growth (covering both mass and prestige outlets), societal trends, and the competitive situation for three popular and growing food and beverage categories: Organic, Functional Foods and Soy-Based Foods and Beverages.

The other reports in this series are:
The U.S. Market for Functional Foods and Beverages
The U.S. Market for Soy-based Foods and Beverages

About our Editorial Partners
Packaged Facts is proud to have the expert collaboration of Marr Barr Communications (www.marrbarr.com) as our editorial partners in the publication of this series. Marr Bar Communications is a strategic marketing and communications agency specializing in socially responsible businesses. Liz Marr and Amy Barr have more than 35 years of consumer and business marketing experience, including experience as senior executives at Horizon Organic Dairy. Their clients include food and household consumer packaged goods companies.

Report Methodology
The information in The U.S. Market for Wellness Foods and Beverages is based on both primary and secondary research. Primary research involved on-site examination of the retail milieu, interviews with marketing, public relations and industry analysts within the organic, soy and functional foods markets and consultants to the industry. Secondary research entailed data-gathering from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature. Sales and consumer data have been derived from the Natural Marketing Institute's Health and Wellness Trends Database, published data from surveys conducted the Food Marketing Institute, Walnut Acres, Whole Foods, the Hartman Group and SPINS. New product information is gathered via literature research, personal interviews and data compiled by ProductScan, a service of Marketing Intelligence Service Ltd.

This series looks at every segment of the organic foods/beverages, soy-based foods/beverages and functional foods/beverages markets, examining trends for growth and projecting sales of products through 2007. It analyzes consumer demographics and their current and projected impact on sales of "wellness" foods and beverages. It provides up-to-date competitive profiles of marketers of organic, soy-based and functional foods and beverages - including a look at smaller, up-and-coming companies - and discusses the influence of demographic trends as a driver of retail trends. The series also spotlights new products and current distribution trends, and offers readers trends and marketing opportunities within the wellness industry.

What You’ll Get in this Report
The U.S. Market for Wellness Foods and Beverages is a brand-new series that offers a unique perspective on the burgeoning market for organic, soy-based and functional foods and beverages. No other market research report provides both the comprehensive analysis and extensive data that The U.S. Market for Wellness Foods and Beverages offers. The individual volumes within the series address the following segments:

  • The Market (including market size and composition, and projected market growth)
  • The Marketers (including discussions of specific marketer brand and market shares)
  • Competitive Profiles (of the mainstream marketers, specialists and up-and-coming niche players, and analyses of the products they market)
  • Retail Strategies
  • The Consumer (who’s buying what, and where)
  • The Products
  • Trends and Opportunities

Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

Scroll to see a more detailed outline of the contents of the individual volume reports in this series.

How You Will Benefit from this Report
If your company is already competing in the wellness market, or is considering making the leap, you will find this series invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current market for wellness foods and beverages, as well as projected sales and trends through 2007. Contributing to that understanding will be a complete analysis of sales data from IRI and other published and trade sources, a detailed discussion of the wellness foods and beverages based on Simmons data.

This report will help:

  • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for wellness food and beverage products
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for products in the organic, soy and functional food and beverage arenas.
  • Advertising agencies working with clients in food and beverage industries understand the product buyer to develop messages and images that compel consumers to purchase these products.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.

U.S. Market for Organic Food and Beverages
Chapter 1: Executive Summary
Scope and Methodology
  • Scope of Report
  • Report Methodology

The Market
  • Organic Is Becoming More Mainstream
  • The Organic Standards - Adding Legitimacy to the Label
  • Table 1-1: National Organic Standards Overview
    • General Regulations
    • Specific Label Requirements
    • At the Farm
    • Organic Livestock Production Rules
    • Penalties

  • More Science Needed to Validate Health Claims
  • Packaged Products Represent Majority of Sales
  • Private Label Sales Will Grow
  • More Organic in Conventional Supermarkets
  • Organic Acreage Increases To Keep Up with Demand
  • Organic Livestock and Poultry Up Dramatically
  • Gains Vary By Crop
  • Organic Index to Help Farmers
  • Winning Customers Over
  • Growth Projections for the Organic Market
  • Table 1-2: U.S. Retail Sales of Organic Foods and Beverages, 2003-2007 (in billions of dollars)

The Competitive Situation
  • Large Companies Building Familiarity and Awareness
  • Manufacturers Report Challenges
  • New Organic Standard Offers Marketing Opportunities
  • Brand Awareness Low
  • More Conglomerates, But Diversity Remains

Distribution Strategies
  • Conventional Stores Grab Bigger Share of Market
  • Table 1-3: Organic Trade Association: Organic Sales Distribution by Outlet (1998 vs. 2001)
  • A Little of This, A Little of That
  • Whole Foods Market Leads Natural Grocery Market
  • Wild Oats - Room for Growth
  • Trader Joe’s - A Unique Format
  • Table 1-4: Overview of Top Natural Foods Retailers
  • Conventional Supermarkets Developing Variety of Strategies
  • Biggest Challenge for Retailers How, Where to Merchandise
  • Foodservice Factor
  • Table 1-5: Tableservice Restaurants Offering Organic Items
  • More Organic Items Could Attract More Customers
  • Restaurant/Manufacturer Partnerships
  • New Chain Offers Natural Options

The Consumer
  • Moving Into the Mainstream
  • Penetration Hovers at 40%
  • Figure 1-1: The Organic Consumer: Percentage of the Population Based on Level of Participation
  • Influences on Purchases
  • Figure 1-2: Organic Penetration in the General Population, 4-Year Trends
  • Table 1-6: Top 5 Sources on Consumers When Making “Healthy” Purchasing Decisions
  • New and Current Users Spur Growth
  • Produce Leads the Way
  • Table 1-7: Organic Products and the Percentage of Consumers Purchasing Such Products
  • Dairy - The Key to Organic Growth?
  • Younger People More Likely to Shop Organic
  • But Don’t Disregard the Boomer
  • Ethnic Diversity: Organic Is Not Solely a Caucasian Market
  • Table 1-8: Purchase Index Rankings of Organic Shoppers, Based on Racial or Ethnic Background
  • Health Concerns Spur Organic Purchases
  • Table 1-9: Reasons Why Consumers Buy Organic Foods and Beverages
  • Number of Organic Shoppers May Be Topping Out
  • Price Remains the Barrier
  • Other Factors Inhibiting Growth in Organic Sales
  • Table 1-10: Reasons Cited for Not Purchasing Organic Foods/Beverages
  • Lapsed Use of Organics
  • Table 1-11: Top 5 Reasons for Lapsed Use of Organic Products

The Products
  • New Products
  • Shoppers Purchase Organic Fruits and Vegetables Most Often
  • Products Becoming More Mainstream, Better Tasting
  • Children’s Items Hot
  • More Private Label
  • Table 1-12: Top 25 Fastest Growing Organic Food and Beverage Categories, 2001
  • Figure 1-3: New Product Introductions, 1987-200: Organic Products Compared to Overall Products

Trends and Opportunities
  • General Growth Trends
    • Industry will continue to evolve and grow
    • Label is key to market growth
    • Still a fragmented market, need “Big Picture marketing Idea”

  • Product Trends
    • Product differentiation and branding
    • Taste is important
    • Convenience will continue to be important
    • Key product areas

  • Prices/Distribution Trends
    • Distribution/price challenges
    • Maintaining integrity of the products

  • Consumer Trends and Opportunities
    • Market diversity will continue to expand
    • Families and kids may be hot market
    • Need for education will continue
    • Clarifying the health messages

Chapter 2: The Market
  • Organic Is Becoming More Mainstream
  • Table 2-1: Total Organic Food and Beverage Industry Sales 2001
  • Figure 2-1:Total Organic Food/Beverage Product Mix 2001

The Regulatory Environment
  • The Organic Standard- Adding Legitimacy to the Label
  • From Farming Term to Marketing Tool
  • Attempts to Use Legislative Loopholes to Circumvent Label Fail
  • Table 2-2: National Organic Standard Overview

Factors Influencing Market Growth
  • Health Concerns Driving Industry
  • Table 2-3: Reasons for Using Organic Products 2002
  • Table 2-4: U.S. Reasons for Not Using Organic Products 2002
  • Chemicals and Food Safety Concerns
  • Consumers Are Unsure About Genetically Modified Organisms
  • More Science Needed to Validate Health Claims
  • The Changing Face of the Organic Consumer
  • More Manufacturers, More Products
  • Table 2-5: Number of New Organic Products Introduced 1987-2002
  • Packaged Products Represent Majority of Sales
  • Private Label Sales Will Grow
  • More Organic in Conventional Supermarkets
  • Table 2-6 Organic Sales in Grocery Stores:
  • Increased Demand May Affect Supply
  • Organic Acreage Increases To Keep Up with Demand
  • Table 2-7: Top 4 Countries According to OverallOrganic Acreage
  • Figure 2-2: Percentage of Overall Organic Farmland Acreage, A Sampling of Countries, 2002
  • Organic Livestock and Poultry Up Dramatically
  • Gain Vary By Crop
  • More Farmers, Still Challenges
  • Prices Remain A Barrier
  • Table 2-8: Top 5 Reasons for Lapsed Use of Organic Products
  • Prices Higher for Several Reasons
  • Organic Index to Help Farmers
  • Winning Consumers Over

Growth Projections for the Organic Market
  • Table 2-9: U.S. Retail Sales of Organic Food and Beverages, 2003-2007
  • Figure 2-3: U.S. Retail Sales of Organic Food and Beverages, 2003-2007

Chapter 3: The Competitive Situation
  • Large Companies Building Familiarity and Awareness
  • Overview of Mergers/Acquisitions in the Organic Market
  • More Conglomerates, But Diversity Remains
  • Manufacturers Report Challenges
  • Will Growth Dilute Organic Message?
  • New Organic Standard Offers Marketing Opportunities
  • Brand Awareness Low
  • Factors Influencing Organic Shoppers
  • Figure 3-1: Percentage of General Population Indicating Awareness of Organic Brands
  • Packaging Moves Away From Environmental Messages
  • Innovative Packaging Offers Opportunities
  • Capturing Mainstream Tastes
  • Price- The Top Challenge

Marketer Profiles: Conglomerates with Natural or Organic Companies
  • The Coca-Cola Company (Odwalla)
  • Kellogg Company (Kashi, Worthington Foods - Morningstar Farms, Natural Touch, Lorna Linda)
  • Kraft Foods, Inc. (Boca Burger)
  • Mars Incorporated (Seeds of Change)

Marketer Profiles: Conglomerates Offering Organic Products
  • H.J. Heinz Company (Organic ketchup)
  • Pepsico, Inc. (Frito-Lay Organic Snacks)
  • Snyders of Hanover (Organic Snacks)
  • Starbucks (Organic coffee, tea, soymilk)

Marketer Profiles: Dairy Products
  • Dean Foods Company (Alta Dena Certified Dairy, White Wave)
    • Brand Leader White Wave
    • Alta Dena Certified Dairy

  • Horizon Organic Dairy
    • Expanding Distribution
    • Internal Expansion
    • Innovative Single-Serve Products
    • Positive Forecast

  • Stonyfield Farm
    • Westward Expansion
    • Adding Yogurt Beverages
    • New Strategies to Reach Kids
    • Ongoing Environmental Commitment
    • Bright Outlook

Marketer Profiles: Meat and Poultry Products
  • Appelgate Farms
    • Trend Spotting
    • Positive Future

  • Green Circle Organics, LLC
    • High End Customers
    • Prices Higher
    • Branching Out into Prepared Meals
    • Growth Ahead

  • Petaluma Holdings (Petaluma Poultry, Coleman Natural Products, B3R Meats)
    • Petaluma Poultry Processors
    • Coleman Natural Products and B3R Country Meats
    • Future Outlook

Marketer Profiles: Multi-Division Companies
  • Acirca (Walnut Acres, ShariAnn’s Organic Soups, Frutti di Bosco)
    • Rapid Expansion of Products
    • Emphasis on Packaging
    • Getting the Word Out
    • Social Commitment

  • General Mills (Small Planet Foods- Cascadian Farms and Muir Glenn)
    • A Natural Purchase
    • Partnership Produces New Cereals
    • Long-Term Farming Leases Secure Supplies
    • Muir Glenn Award Winning Tomatoes

  • Hain Celestial
    • Focus on Organic
    • Two Totally Organic Lines
    • Imagine Foods - Most Recent Acqisitions
    • A Variety of New Products
    • International Expansion

Marketer Profiles: Cooperatives
  • Frontier National Products Co-op
    • Simply Organic Sales Improving
    • New Teas

  • Organic Valley of Farms
    • Moving into Meat
    • New Northeast Regional Milk Program
    • Educating Consumers Top Priority
    • Optimistic About Future

Marketer Profiles: Large Independents
  • Amy’s Kitchen
    • Convenience
    • Health Related Items
    • International

  • Eden Foods
    • Edensoy
    • Japanese Influence
    • Juices

  • Nature’s Path
    • Cereals Top Priority
    • Reaching Out to Kids
    • Frozen Waffles Offer Opportunities and Challenges

Marketer Profiles: Niche Marketers
  • Annie’s Homegrown, Inc.
    • Moving Into the Mainstream
    • Mix of Organic and Natural, Adult and Kid Products
    • Familiar but “Better”
    • Poised for Growth

  • Country Choice Naturals
  • Natural Selection Foods (Earthbound Farm)
    • Organic Salads Outpacing Conventional
    • Convenience Driving Market
    • Building Brand Awareness
    • Weather Helps Sales
    • Packaging Variety

  • Newman’s Own Organics

Marketer Profiles: Up and Comers
  • AllGoode Organics
  • Honest Tea
    • More Antioxidants
    • Growth Ahead

  • NRE World Bento
    • Four Varieties Available

  • Organica Foods
  • Uncle Matt’s Organic
  • Supplies and Pricing Issues

Chapter 4: The Products
  • New Products
  • Gateway Products
  • Shoppers Purchase Organic Fruits and Vegetables Most Often
  • Products Becoming More Mainstream, Better Tasting
  • Children’s Items Hot
  • More Private Label
  • Table 4-1: Top 25 Packaged Organic Food and Beverage Sales, 2001
  • Table 4-2: Top 25 Fastest Growing Organic Food and Beverage Categories, 2001
  • Figure 4-1:New Product Introductions 1987-2000, Organic Products Compared to Overall Products
  • Table 4-3: New Product Introductions, 2002

Product Category: Organic Dairy Products
  • Dairy Sales Top $600 Million
  • Strong Growth Expected to Continue
  • Supermarkets Capture Most Organic Milks Sales
  • Dramatic Increase in Organic Milk Cows
  • New Products
  • New Packaging Ideas
  • Drinkable Yogurts and Smoothies
  • Flavored Drinks are Hot
  • Table 4-4: Packaged Organic Dairy Sales and One-Year Sales Growth
  • Figure 4-2: Projected Growth Rate Packaged Organic Dairy Products
  • Figure 4-3: Dairy New Products (Number of New SKU’s Introduced)

Product Category: Organic Beverages
  • Juices are Top Growth Area
  • Teas Brewing Strong Sales
  • Organic Coffee is Alowly Building Steam
  • Table 4-5: Packaged Organic Beverage Sales 2001, Percentage Market and One-Year Sales Growth
  • Figure 4-4: Projected Growth Rate for Organic Beverage Products

Product Category: Organic Frozen Food
  • Demographics Propel Sales
  • Convenience and Comfort Foods Drive Market
  • More Natural and Conventional Companies Getting into the Market
  • Price May Not Be as Much of an Issue
  • Frozen Moving Slowly into Conventional Supermarkets
  • Table 4-6: Packaged Organic Frozen Food Sales and Market 2001, and One-Year Sales Growth
  • Figure 4-5: Projected Growth Rate for Organic Frozen Products

Product Category: Packaged Organic Breads and Grains
  • Bread Products Branching Out
  • Upscale Breads Rising
  • Marketing Wellness
  • Cereals - Not Just for Breakfast
  • Mainstream Companies and Private Label Joining the Market
  • Growing Competition
  • Children’s Market Offers Long-Term Growth
  • Table 4-7: Packaged Bread & Grain Sales and Market 2001, and One-Year Sales Growth
  • Table 4-8: Projected Growth Rate for Organic Bread and Grains

Product Category: Organic Packaged Snacks
  • Chips, Pretzels and Snacks- More Mainstream
  • Puffed Snacks, No Hot Air
  • Bars - Full of Energy
  • Target Marketing Grows
  • Cookies - Sweet Sales Growth
  • Figure 4-6: Projected Grwoth Rate for Snacks

Product Category: Soyfoods, Meat/Dairy Alternatives,Tofu
  • New Flavor and Private Label Products
  • Frozen/Refrigerated Sales Hot
  • Acreage Increasing to Keep Up with Demand
  • Table 4-9: Packaged Non-Dairy Beverages, Tofu and Frozen Meat Alternatives Sales 2001, and One-Year Sales Growth
  • Table 4-10: Growth Rates for Soyfoods

Product Category: Packaged Organic Fresh Produce
  • Convenience and Pesticide Concerns Fuel Growth
  • Packaged Salads Take Off
  • Sprouting Up in Grocery Stores
  • Organic Acreage Grows
  • Table 4-12: Certified Organic Vegetable Acreage Compared to Total U.S. Certified Cropland

Product Category: Frozen and Refrigerated Organic Meat, Poultry and Eggs
  • Pricing Challenges
  • Market Penetration
  • New Products - Both Upscale and Mainstream
  • Organic Livestock and Poultry Increasing
  • Table 4-13: Packaged Frozen and Refrigerated Meats, Poultry, Seafood and Eggs 2001, and One-Year Sales Growth
  • Table 4-14: Projected Growth Rate for Meat, Poultry & Eggs
  • Table 4-15: Certified Organic Livestock and Poultry

Chapter 5: Distribution Strategies
  • Conventional Stores Grab Bigger Share of Market
  • Table 5-1: Organic Trade Association: Organic Sales Distribution by Outlet (1998 vs. 2001)
  • A Little of This, A Little of That
  • Organic Spreads to College Cafés
  • Figure 5-1: Total Organic Food/Beverage Industry Sales by Channel, 2001

Distribution Strategies - Supermarkets
  • Whole Foods Market Leads Natural Grocery Market
    • Private Label Strategies

  • Wild Oats - Room for Growth
  • Trader Joe’s - A Unique Format
  • Table 5-2: Overview of Top Natural Foods Retailers
  • Conventional Supermarkets Developing Variety of Strategies
    • Private Label
    • Store-Within-a-Store
    • Mainstreaming Products

  • Biggest Challenge for Retailers How, Where to Merchandise
  • Some Challenges Remain

Distribution Strategies - Restaurants
  • Table 5-3: Tableservice Restaurants Offering Organic Items
  • More Organic Items Could Attract More Customers
  • Restaurant/Manufacturer Partnerships
  • Chef’s Collaborative Builds Awareness
  • Certified Organic Restaurants
    • Restaurant Nora
    • Ukiah Brewing Co. & Restaurant

  • Fast Food Jumping Into The Market
  • New Chain Offers Natural Options

Chapter 6: The Consumer
  • A Greater Openness to Organic Shopping
  • Moving Into the Mainstream
  • Penetration Hovers at 40%
  • A General Profile of the Organic Consumer
  • “Types” of Organic Consumers
  • Figure 6-1: The Organic Consumer: Percentage of the Population Based on Level of Participation
  • Figure 6-2: Percentage of Consumers Who Use Organic Foods: Overall, Regularly, Occasionally and Infrequently
  • Figure 6-3: Organic Penetration in the General Population, 4-Year Trends

Attitudes and Influences Affecting Organic Usage
  • Health, Food Safety Issues Lead the Way
  • Table 6-1: Consumer Awareness of “Health & Wellness” Terminology
  • Influences on Purchases
  • Adherents Have Stronger Beliefs
  • Table 6-2: Top 5 Sources on Consumers When Making “Healthy” Purchasing Decisions
  • Figure 6-4: Percent of Consumers Who Agree Completely/Somewhat with the Following Statement: “Organic Foods/Beverages...”

The Consumer and Market Growth
  • New and Current Users Spur Growth
  • Figure 6-5: Percentage of Organic Users Who Anticipate Greater Consumption in the Coming Year
  • Produce Leads the Way
  • Table 6-3: Organic Products and the Percentage of Consumers Purchasing Such Products
  • Dairy - The Key to Organic Growth?

The Changing Face of the Organic Consumer
  • Younger People More Likely to Shop Organic
  • Table 6-4: Percentage of Young Adults Purchasing Organic Beverages
  • But Don’t Disregard the Boomer
  • Ethnic Diversity: Organic Is Not Solely a Caucasian Market
  • Table 6-5: Purchase Index Rankings of Organic Shoppers, Based on Racial or Ethnic Background
  • Table 6-6: Attitude Towards Purchasing Organics Index, Based on Racial or Ethnic Background
  • Marketer Response: Hispanic-Oriented Organic Products/Promotions
  • Education and Income: Not Necessarily What One Would Expect

Factors Influencing the Consumer to Buy Organic
  • Education - Key Issue to Winning More Shoppers
  • But Careful Not to Overdo It
  • Figure 6-6: Consumer Understanding Regarding Organic Foods/Beverages
  • Experts Agree: Health Concerns Drive Sales
  • Throw in the Environment for Good Measure
  • The Numbers Support the Observations
  • Kids Count - But Only So Far
  • Table 6-7: Reasons Why Consumers Buy Organic Foods and Beverages

Factors Influencing Consumers to Not Buy Organic
  • Number of Organic Shoppers May Be Topping Out
  • Price Remains the Barrier
  • Other Factors Inhibiting Growth in Organic Sales
  • Table 6-8: Reasons Cited for Not Purchasing Organic Foods/Beverages
  • Lapsed Use of Organics
  • Table 6-9: Top 5 Reasons for Lapsed Use of Organic Products
  • Availability and Selection May Drive Sales

Shopping Profiles and Patterns of Organic Consumers
  • Where Do People Buy Organic Products?
  • Figure 6-7: Channels Where People Buy Organic Items
  • Shopping Attributes of the Organic Consumer
  • Table 6-10: Shopping Characteristics of Organic Shoppers
  • A Little of This, A Little of That

Chapter 7: Trends and Opportunities
  • General Growth Trends
    • Industry will Continue to Evolve and Grow
    • Fairly Unpredictable Time
    • Label is Key to Market Growth
    • Retailer Optimism and Involvement will Grow
    • Still a Fragmented Market, Need “Big Picture Marketing Idea”

  • Product Trends
    • Product Differentiation and Branding
    • Taste is Important
    • Convenience will Continue to be Important
    • Key Product Areas

  • Prices/Distribution Trends
    • Distribution/Price Challenges
    • Cost Challenges
    • Resource Availability
    • Maintaining Integrity of the Products

    Consumer Trends and Opportunities
    • Market Diversity will Continue to Expand
    • Families and Kids May be Hot Market
    • Need for Education will Continue
    • Marketing Messages/Merchandising Strategies
    • Clarifying the Health Messages

Appendix: Addresses of Select Marketers

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