The U.S. Market for Non-Chocolate Candy

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Published Mar 1, 2005 | 151 Pages | Pub ID: LA1037710

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With candy universally popular, endlessly varied, and ubiquitously available, the overall U.S. market is largely mature. Moreover, ever-growing consumer health and obesity concerns have kept consumption levels generally flat, even as marketer competition and innovation have been dampened by a sluggish economy, market consolidation, and rising costs. The competitive response? Novelty products for kids (notably including interactive and “extreme” candies) and licensed products are the driving trends in the non-chocolate candy market, along with innovative new flavors.

Following in the footsteps of chocolate candy, healthier non-chocolates also are gaining ground, including those based on diet, natural, and premium appeals; indeed, even if low-carb candy sales were buoyed by a consumer fad, nutritional concerns are now a permanent feature of the candy market. Productscan tracking of non-chocolate candy new product introductions show the number of no- or low-sugar/carb package tags tripling from 2000 to 2004, while the number of “real” ingredient (typically real fruit) or high-fruit content tags doubled. Driven in large part by the low-carb craze, technology seems to have finally caught up with consumer tastes, and a particular area of growth will be in lower- or no-sugar products aimed at kids and teens, along with upscale entries aimed mainly at adults.

Packaged Facts’ new report, The U.S. Market for Non-Chocolate Candy, analyzes sales and growth potential for hard and chewy non-chocolates, kids’ novelty and interactive candies, mints other than breath fresheners, fruit- and mint-flavored candies, non-chocolate nut candies, licorice and gummies, diet candies, and seasonal offerings. The report surveys marketing and new product trends and dissects consumer demographics for non-chocolate candy overall, fruit/mint non-chocolates, caramel/nut non-chocolates, and leading brands. The report also tracks variations in food- and health-related attitudes among adult consumers of non-chocolate candy, presenting comparisons with chocolate candy, as well as detailed brand preference data for teens (age 12-17) and children (age 6-ll) as prime consumers.

Report Methodology
The information in The U.S. Market for Non-Chocolate Candy based on both primary and secondary research. Primary research involved on-site examination of the retail milieu, interviews with marketing, public relations and industry analysts within the candy market and consultants to the industry. Secondary research entailed data-gathering from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature. Packaged Facts has derived mass merchandiser sales figures from Information Resources, Inc. (IRI) InfoScan sales-tracking data. Figures provided on national consumer advertising expenditures are based primarily on data (copyright 2004) compiled by TNS Media Intelligence/CMR, the leading provider of strategic advertising and marketing communications intelligence. The analysis of consumer demographics derives from Simmons Market Research Bureau survey data for spring 2004. New product information is gathered via literature research, personal interviews and data compiled by ProductScan, a service of Datamonitor.

What You’ll Get in this Report
The U.S. Market for Non-Chocolate Candy is a brand-new report that offers a unique perspective on the changing market for non-chocolate candies. No other market research report provides both the comprehensive analysis and extensive data that The U.S. Market for Non-Chocolate Candy offers. The report addresses the following segments:

  • The Market (including market size and composition, and projected market growth)
  • The Marketers (including discussions of specific marketer brand and market shares)
  • The Consumer (who’s buying what, and where)
  • The Products
  • Trends and Opportunities

Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

How You Will Benefit from this Report
If your company is already competing in the non-chocolate candy market, or is considering making the leap, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current market for non-chocolate candies, as well as projected sales and trends through 2009. Contributing to that understanding will be a complete analysis of sales data from IRI and other published and trade sources, a detailed discussion of the consumer for candy based on Simmons data.

This report will help:

  • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for non-chocolate candy.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for products in the non-chocolate candy arena.
  • Advertising agencies working with clients in the food industry understand the product buyer to develop messages and images that compel consumers to purchase these products.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.

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