Cheese: Natural and Specialty Cheeses in the U.S. and Global Markets

Mar 1, 2010
335 Pages - Pub ID: LA2406308
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With U.S. production of natural and specialty blended (N&SB) cheese at an all-time high — 10 billion-plus pounds by the end of 2009 — marketers are aggressively creating points of differentiation to better establish their brands in this highly competitive and crowded category. With more than 300 varieties of natural cheese made in the States, as well as just as many specialty blended cheeses, this is no easy feat, particularly when there are more than 200 marketers vying for the attention of consumers, retailers, chefs and even prepared foods product developers.

This first-of-its-kind report —Cheeses: Natural and Specialty Cheeses in the U.S. and Global Markets— will help anyone involved in the U.S. cheese market to better grasp the magnitude of the category. Cheese: Natural and Specialty Cheeses in the U.S. and Global Markets contains comprehensive data on the U.S. market for fresh, semi-aged and aged natural cheeses, as well as value-added, premium blended cheeses, such as fat-modified, nutrient-fortified and flavor-enhanced products — not the slices that top a burger or fill a sub sandwich. The report covers historical (2005-2009) and forecast (2010-2014) retail sales data, as well as a lengthy analysis of foodservice and industrial use of these cheese categories. The report discusses key trends affecting the marketplace, trends driving growth and consumer demographics. In addition, the report provides insight to the activities of key cheese marketers, as well as up-and-coming players...in the States as well as globally.

Read an excerpt from this report below.

Report Methodology

The information in Cheese: Natural and Specialty Cheeses in the U.S. and Global Markets is based on primary and secondary research. Primary research entailed in-depth, on-site examinations of retail outlets and interviews with cheesemakers, marketers, distributors, buyers and retailers to obtain information on new product and packaging trends, marketing programs, distribution methods and technological breakthroughs. Secondary research entailed data gathering from relevant sources, including consumer and industry publications, newspapers, government reports, company literature and corporate annual reports. Sales of packaged products are based on data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Information Resources, Inc. and other trade sources. Consumer demographics are derived from Experian Simmons data.

What You’ll Get in This Report

Cheese: Natural and Specialty Cheeses in the U.S. and Global Markets makes important predictions and recommendations regarding the future of this market, and pinpoints ways current and prospective players can capitalize on current trends and spearhead new ones. No other market research report provides both the comprehensive analysis and extensive data that Cheese: Natural and Specialty Cheeses in the U.S. and Global Markets offers. No other report includes both an analysis of brands and marketers, as well as overall sales data by cheese form, variety and other descriptors. Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

How You’ll Benefit from This Report

If your company is already involved in the cheese business, from any angle — manufacturing, marketing, distribution, packaging, ingredients, etc. — or is considering making the leap, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current market for natural and specialty blended cheese, as well as projected markets and trends through 2014.

This report will help:

  • Marketing managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for natural and specialty blended cheese.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for natural and specialty blended cheese.
  • Advertising agencies working with clients in the banking and retail industries understand the product buyer to develop messages and images that compel consumers to buy natural and specialty blended cheese.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.

Chapter 1: Executive Summary
Products and Channels Analyzed in This Report
Natural Cheese
Specialty Blended Cheese
Products Outside of Scope
Imitation Cheeses Not Included
The List of Cheeses Is Infinite
Product Classifications in This Report
American
Italian
Hispanic
Other
Common Categorizing Schemes
By Manufacturing
By Cure
By Consistency
Cheese Manufacturing and Marketing
The U.S. Cheese Manufacturing Business
The Cheesemaker
The Cheese Marketer
The Cheesemonger
U.S. Cheese Manufacturing Facilities
Table 1-1: Number of U.S. Plants Producing Cheese, by Type, 1988, 1998 and 2008
Total U.S. Production of Natural Cheese
Table 1-2: Total U.S. Production of Natural Cheese, in Weight by Variety, 1988, 1998 and 2008
Hispanic Cheese Production Shows Triple-Digit Growth
Total U.S. Process Cheese Production Is Down
Table 1-3: Total U.S. Production of Process Cheese Products, in Weight by Type, 1998 vs. 2008
The Market
Retail N&SB Cheese Market $14.1 Billion in 2009 and $16.7B by 2014
Table 1-4: Total U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Sales, 2005-2014 (in billion dollars)
Private Label Share of Category
Figure 1-1: Share of U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Sales, Branded vs. Private Label 2009
Share by Fat Content
Figure 1-2: Share of U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Sales, by Fat Content, 2009
Share by Form
Figure 1-3: Share U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Sales, by Form, 2009
Share of Hispanic, Organic and Imports Together Are Less Than 5% in 2009. 11
Distribution Channels
Three Distribution Channels
Retail
Location for Overall Retail N&SB Cheese Sales
Higher Cheese Prices Are Not Deterring Sales
Foodservice
Where Foodservice Operators Get Their Cheese
Sandwich Chains Use Mostly Process Cheese
Pizza Is Where Cheese Volumes Move in Foodservice
Ingredient
Suppliers to the Foodservice and Food Processing Channels
The Global Marketplace
Global Cheese Data: Past, Present and Future
Figure 1-4: Global Cheese Production, by Milk Type, 2005
U.S. Leads in Global Cheese Production
Figure 1-5: Share of Global Cheese Production, by Top-10 Countries, 2009
International Cheese Trends
The Consumer
Per Capita Consumption of Natural Cheese
Table 1-5: Total U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Natural Cheese, in Weight, by variety, 1988, 1998 and 2008
Hispanic Cheese Per Capita Consumption Doubles from 98 to 08
U.S. Household Cheese Use
By Fat Content
By Form
By Variety
Trends and Innovations
Beyond Being a Concentrated Source of Milk
The Package Variable
What Goes in the Package
Milk Sourcing
Taste Rules
Better-for-You Is More About Addition than Subtraction


Chapter 2: The Product
Key Issues
Products Analyzed
Definition of the Market
Natural Cheese
Specialty Blended Cheese
Retail
Foodservice
Ingredient
Products Outside of Scope
Imitation Cheeses Not Included
Understanding Cheese
History of Cheese
Will the Real American Cheese Stand Up?
Cheese Making in America
The U.S. Cheese Manufacturing Business
What Is Rennet?
Key Product Players
The Regulators
The Cheesemaker
A Wisconsin Master Cheesemaker
The Cheese Marketer
The Cheesemonger
Product Classifications
The List of Cheeses Is Infinite
Federal Standards of Identity
Product Classifications in This Report
American
Italian
Hispanic
Other
Common Categorizing Schemes
By Manufacturing
Table 2-1: Categorization of Cheese by Manufacturing Process
Distinct Process
Characteristics
Example Cheeses
By Cure
By Consistency
Table 2-2: Federal Standards for Cheeses Classified by Consistency
Other Industry Descriptors
Artisan
Barrel
Block
Specialty
The Grading of Natural Cheese
Packaged Cheese Forms
Ball
Bar/Chunk
Crumble
Cube
Curds
Cylinder/Horn
Diced
Grated
Loaf
Log
Longhorn
Shred
Slice
Spread
String
Wedge
Wheel/Round
Packaging Styles
Natural Rind
Waxed
Cutting the 640
Recent Introduction
Other Cutting Technologies
The Cutting and Packaging Facility
The Importance of the Package
Defining Sustainable Packaging
U.S. Cheese Production
Cheesemakers Don’t Always Market Cheese
Some Cheesemakers Consider Themselves Whey Producers
U.S. Cheese Manufacturing Facilities
Table 2-3: Number of U.S. Plants Producing Cheese, by Type, 1988, 1998 and 2008
Some of the Best Cheese in the World
U.S. Cheesemakers Set New Standard at World Cheese Awards
Total U.S. Production of Natural Cheese
Table 2-4: Total U.S. Production of Natural Cheese, in Weight by Variety, 1988, 1998, and 2008
Figure 2-1: Total U.S. Production of Natural Cheese, in Weight by Variety, 1988, 1998, and 2008
Cheddar Loses Share to Other Cheeses
Table 2-5: Total U.S. Production of Natural Cheese, Percent Share by Variety, 1988, 1998, and 2008
Figure 2-2: Total U.S. Production of Natural Cheese, Percent Share by Variety, 2008
Other American Cheese Production Share Increases
Table 2-6: Total U.S. Production of Natural American Cheese, Percent Share by Variety, 1998 vs. 2008
Figure 2-3: Total U.S. Production of Natural American Cheese, Percent Share by Variety, 2008
Production of All Natural Italian Cheeses Is Up
Table 2-7: Total U.S. Production of Natural Italian Cheese, in Weight by Variety, 1998 vs. 2008
Table 2-8: Total U.S. Production of Natural Italian Cheese, Percent Share by Variety, 1998 vs. 2008
Figure 2-4: Total U.S. Production of Natural Italian Cheese, Percent Share by Variety, 2008
Hispanic Cheese Production Shows Triple-Digit Growth
Table 2-9: Total U.S. Production of Other Natural Cheese, in Weight by Variety, 1998 vs. 2008
Table 2-10: Total U.S. Production of Natural Italian Cheese, Percent Share by Variety, 1998 vs. 2008
Figure 2-5: Total U.S. Production of Other Natural Cheese, Percent Share by Variety, 2008
Two Leading States in Natural Cheese Production
Table 2-11: Two Leading States in Natural Cheese Production, by Weight by Variety, 2008
Wisconsin Cheeses Captures 43 Awards in 2009 Competition
Total U.S. Process Cheese Production Is Down
Table 2-12: Total U.S. Production of Process Cheese Products, in Weight by Type, 1998 vs. 2008
Figure 2-6: Total U.S. Production of Process Cheese Products, in Weight by Type, 1998 vs. 2008 Source: Based on data obtained through USDA, National Agricultural Statistics Services
Cold-Pack Has Very Small Share of Process Cheese Production
Table 2-13: Total U.S. Production of Process Cheese Products, Percent Share by Type, 1998 vs. 2008
Figure 2-7: Total U.S. Production of Process Cheese Products, Percent Share by Type, 2008
Government Regulations
The Regulatory Environment
USDA Buys Cheese
IDFA and NMPF Propose Collective Label Declaration for UF Milk
Labeling Nomenclature
Provide the Facts: Nutritional Information Musts
Products that Are Exempt
Nutrition Regulations in Foodservice
Health, Nutrient Content and Structure/Function Claims
Significant Scientific Agreement Health Claims
Qualified Health Claims
Nutrient Content Claims
Structure/Function Claims
Sodium Concerns
The Term Natural Is Under Fire
Marketing Label Claims
CLA Presence
Farmstead
Fat Content
Grass Fed
Locally Produced
Organic
No Added Hormones
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Pasture Grazed
Probiotics
Labeling Allergens
FDA Says Labels Must Identify Certain Color Additives by Name
Raw Milk Concerns Do Not Involve Raw Milk Aged Cheeses
Manufacturing Raw Milk Cheese Becomes Legal in Maryland
Listeria Concerns
Eliminating Zero Tolerance Policy
FDA Issues New Draft Guidance on Listeria that Follows Science, Research
Are You Prepared for a Product Recall?
A Sampling of Recalls
Table 2-14: A Sampling of Recalls, 2004-2009
How a Recall Impacts Consumers and Businesses
A Recall Is Bad; Closure Is Often the End of Business


Chapter 3: The Market
Key Issues
Market Value
Total U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Market Valued at $ 14.1 Billion
Table 3-1: Total U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Sales, 2005-2009 (in billion dollars)
Figure 3-1: Total U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Sales, 2005-2009 (in billion dollars)
Market Composition
Branded Vs. Private Label
Private Label Experiences Double-Digit Compound Annual Growth
Table 3-2: Total U.S. N&SB Retail Cheese Sales, Branded vs. Private Label, 2005-2009 (in million dollars)
In 2009, Private Label N&SB Cheese Had 44% Share of Category
Figure 3-2: Share of U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Sales, Branded vs. Private Label 2009
Retail N&SB Dollar Sales by Fat Content
Table 3-3: Total U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Sales, by Fat Content, 2005-2009 (in million dollars)
Figure 3-3: Share of U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Sales, by Fat Content, 2009
Almost All Retail Forms of N&SB Cheese Show Sales Growth
Table 3-4: Total U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Sales, by Form, 2005-2009 (in million dollars)
Chunk/Wedge and Shredded Control More than Two-Thirds of Sales
Figure 3-4: Share U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Sales, by Form, 2009
Hispanic Cheese is Less Than 2% of Dollar Sales
Figure 3-5: Share U.S. Retail N&SB Hispanic Cheese Sales, 2009
Organic Cheese about a $70 Million Retail Market
Figure 3-6: Share U.S. Retail N&SB Organic Cheese Sales, 2009
Service Deli Slices More Than 10% of Retail N&SB Cheese Sales
Figure 3-7: Share U.S. Retail N&SB Service Deli Cheese Sales, 2009
Imports Are a Mere 2.1% of N&SB Retail Cheese Sales
Figure 3-8: Share U.S. Retail N&SB Imported Cheese Sales, 2009
Cheddar is Almost Double Mozzarella in Retail Dollar Sales
Figure 3-9: Share U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Sales, by Variety, 2009
In Foodservice, Mozzarella Has Almost Half Share of Cheese Use
Figure 3-10: Share U.S. Foodservice N&SB Cheese Use, by Variety, 2009
Projected Market Growth
Innovation and Desire to Explore New Cheeses Drives Growth
Table 3-5: Projected U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Sales, 2009-2014 (in billion dollars)
Figure 3-11: Projected U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Sales, 2009-2014 (in billion dollars)


Chapter 4: The Marketers
Key Issues
Overview of Marketers
Maker vs. Marketer
More than 200 Marketers
The Top-Two Marketers
Sargento Is Much More Than Number-Two; It’s Processor of the Year
Leading Chunk/Wedge Players
Tillamook Celebrates 100 Years of Excellence
Lactalis Strong in Retail, Even Though It’s Only about 40% of Its Business
Agri-Mark Determined to Grow Nationally
Hispanic Cheese Leaders
DCI: The Multi-Brand Marketer
Just One Brand: BelGioioso
Beyond the Top-25
Table 4-1: Top-25 U.S. Retail N&SB Chunk/Wedge Cheese Marketers, by Brands and Share of Market, 2009
Sargento Is Number-Two in Shredded Cheese
Fewer Branded Marketers of Shredded Cheese
Table 4-2: Top-10 U.S. Retail N&SB Shredded Cheese Marketers, by Brands and Share of Market, 2009
Sargento Beats Kraft in Slices
Table 4-3: Top-10 U.S. Retail N&SB Sliced Cheese Marketers, by Brands and Share of Market, 2009
Saputo Shines as Number-Three in String Cheese
Organic Snacking Cheese
The String Cheese Specialists
Table 4-4: Top-10 U.S. Retail N&SB String and Similar Cheese Marketers, by Brands and Share of Market, 2009
The Grated Cheese Category Is All About Kraft and Private Label
Table 4-5: Top-5 U.S. Retail N&SB Grated Cheese Marketers, by Brands and Share of Market, 2009
BC-USA Is Number-Three in Crumbled Cheese
Leading Marketers to Foodservice and Food Processing
Leprino Owns Mozzarella
Grande Is Number-Two in Mozzarella
Three Cheddar Leaders All Are in the Whey Business
Minor Cheddar Suppliers
Private Label Marketers


Chapter 5: Retail Overview
Key Issues
Retail Distribution
Retail Distribution Methods
Direct Delivery Advantages
The Cost of Face-To-Face Business
Advantages of Warehouse Delivery
Smaller Marketers Work through Brokers
Distribution Is Second Highest Cost Next to Production
Electronic Data Aids in Restocking
Sargento Invests in Warehouse Distribution Software
Retail Outlets
The Retail Environment
Retailers Speak Out
Shopping Options Are Plentiful
Changing Channels
Supermarkets
Supercenters
C-Stores
Club Stores
Dollar Stores
Online Shopping
Figure 5-1: Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Internet Specials for Christmas 2009
Location for Overall Retail N&SB Cheese Sales
Figure 5-2: Share of U.S. Retail N&SB Cheese Sales, by Channel, 2009
The Leading Retailers
Getting Your Product in with the Leaders
The Leaders Sell More than Food
Club Stores
Table 5-1: Top-20 U.S. Retailers that Sell Cheese, by Major Retail Banners, Dollar Sales and Private Label Cheese Brands, 2008 or Fiscal 2008
Target Dedicated to Growing Private Label Foods Lines
Private Label Leaders
The New Kid on the Block
Could Generic Make a Comeback?
Recent Private Label Introductions
A&P Goes Artisan
Aldi Spreads its Signature
Giant Eagle Goes Gourmet
Trader Joe’s Gets Baked
Food Channel Predicts 2010 the Year of the Grocery Store
Despite Economy, Retailers Grow Upscale Cheese Department
Specialty Retailers Are Investing in Cheese, Too
The Cheese Store
Managing Cheese Case Space
Dairy-Case Cheese
Self-Serve Deli Cheese Case or Counter
Retailers’ Marketing and Promotion Programs
Wisconsin Cheese Toolbox and Interactive Website
Carving Out a Cheese Claus
Experian Simmons Consumer Shopping Analysis
Experian Simmons Consumer Survey
Where Cheese Users Shop for Particular Cheese
By Fat Content
Table 5-2: U.S. Households Using Natural Cheese by Varying Fat Contents: Comparing National Retail Chain Shopped, by Index, 2009
By Form
By Variety
Table 5-3: U.S. Households Using Natural Cheese by Varying Form: Comparing National Retail Chain Shopped, by Index, 2009
Table 5-4: U.S. Households Using Natural Cheese by Varying Variety, Comparing National Retail Chain Shopped, by Index, 2009
By Brand
ITable 5-5: U.S. Households Using Select Brands of Natural Cheese in the Past Seven Days, Comparing National Retail Chain Shopped, by Index, 2009
Specialty Blended Cheese
Table 5-6: U.S. Households Using Select Specialty Blended Cheeses by Varying Form, Comparing National Retail Chain Shopped, by Index, 2009
Comparative Pricing
Higher Cheese Prices Are Not Deterring Sales
Comparative Cheese Pricing
Table 5-7: U.S. Natural and Specialty Blended Cheese Pricing Comparison: Suggested Retail Price of Select Products, 2009
Table 5-8: U.S. Natural Shredded Low-Moisture Part-Skim Mozzarella Cheese Pricing Comparison, Branded vs. Unbranded, 2009
Table 5-9: U.S. Natural Chunk Medium or Sharp Cheddar Cheese Pricing Comparison, Branded vs. Unbranded, 2009
Table 5-10: U.S. Natural Deli-Style Sliced Swiss Cheese Pricing Comparison, Branded vs. Unbranded, 2009
Table 5-11: U.S. Natural String/Stick Low-Moisture Part-Skim Mozzarella Cheese Pricing Comparison, Branded vs. Unbranded, 2009
Table 5-12: Club Store vs. Supermarket Prices for Select Cheese Products, 2009
What Do Cheesemongers Charge?


Chapter 6: Foodservice Overview
Key Issues
Overview of Foodservice Channel
Status of the Foodservice Industry
Calculating Restaurant Performance Index
Recovery in 2010 Will Come in Third Quarter
Trends for 2010
The Cheese Foodservice Business
Ingredient Varieties
Foodservice Cheese Claims
Where Foodservice Operators Get Their Cheese
Cheese Suppliers to Foodservice Distributors
Leading Distributors
Table 6-1: Top-Five U.S. Foodservice Distributors, Dollar Sales and Number of Distribution Centers, 2009
Sysco Corp
U.S. Foodservice, Inc.
Gordon Food Service, Inc.
Performance Food Group Co.
Reinhart FoodService
Foodservice Chains
Top-25 Restaurant Chains
Top-10 Contract Chains
Sandwich Chains Use Mostly Process Cheese
Table 6-2: Top-25 U.S. Restaurant Chains that Purchase Cheese, Ranked by Dollar Sales, Fiscal 2008
Table 6-3: Top-10 U.S. Contract Chains that Buy Cheese, Ranked by Dollar Sales, Fiscal 2008
Pizza Is Where Cheese Volumes Move in Foodservice
The Next Big Trend in Pizza: Neapolitan
Using Locally Produced Cheese
Top-10 Pizza Chains
Table 6-4: Top-10 U.S. Pizza Chains that Buy Cheese, Ranked by Dollar Sales, Fiscal 2008
Focus on Value Drive’s Pizza Chain Growth
Rising Cheese Prices Might Dampen Promotions
Ethnic-Themed Foodservice
Table 6-5: Top-10 U.S. Italian Chains that Buy Cheese, Ranked by Dollar Sales, Fiscal 2008
Table 6-6: Top-10 U.S. Mexican Full-Service Chains that Buy Cheese, Ranked by Dollar Sales, Fiscal 2008
Table 6-7: Top-10 U.S. Mexican Fast-Food and Quick-Service Chains that Buy Cheese, Ranked by Dollar Sales, Fiscal 2008
Adding Cheese to the Menu
Dairy Checkoff Increases Cheese Use
Fast-Food and Quick-Service Innovations
Dunkin’ Donuts
McDonald’s
Potbelly
New Casual Dining Offerings
Friday’s “Three For” Deal
Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill and Bar
School Menus
Rosen’s Perfect Pizza
Good-for-You Filled Pasta
DMI Believes Low-Fat Cheese Has a Home in Schools
Appeal to USDA
Fine-Dining Cheese Opportunities
Old Hickory Statehouse
What’s Hot on Menus
Internet Chef Survey
Appetizers
Table 6-8: Trends in Appetizers, by Chef Ranking
Entrées/Main Dishes
Table 6-9: Trends in Entrées/Main Dishes, by Chef Ranking
Sides/Starches
Table 6-10: Trends in Sides/Starches, by Chef Ranking
Kids’ Meals
Table 6-11: Trends in Kids’ Meals, by Chef Ranking
Breakfast/Brunch
Table 6-12: Trends in Breakfast/Brunch, by Chef Ranking
Desserts
Table 6-13: Trends in Desserts, by Chef Ranking
Ethnic Cuisine
Table 6-14: Trends in Ethnic Cuisine, by Chef Ranking
Culinary Themes
Table 6-15: Trends in Culinary Themes, by Chef Ranking


Chapter 7: Ingredient Overview
Key Issues
The Cheese Ingredients Business
Ingredient Varieties
Prepared Foods Cheese Claims
Figure 7-1: Celeste Original Pizza
Figure 7-2: Weight Watchers Smart Ones Artisan Creations Pizza
Suppliers to the Food Industry
Sargento’s Custom Melts Line
Figure 7-3: Sargento Custom Melts
Opportunities for Cheesemakers
Ingredient Applications
The Opportunities Are Infinite
Frozen Pizza Is Number-One
Leading Frozen Pizza Marketers
Frozen Cheese Pizza Is So Much More than Mozzarella
Figure 7-4: Freschetta Naturally Rising 4-Cheese Pizza
Kraft Exiting Pizza
The Deal
Nestlé Will Be Largest Ingredient Customer for Cheesemakers
Frozen Dinner and Entrée Leaders
Regional and Niche Players
Ethnic Players
Natural and Organic Marketers
Recent Introductions Including Cheese
Figure 7-5: Stouffer’s Corner Bistro Grilled Mesquite-Style Chicken Panini
Figure 7-6: Five Cheese & Spinach Flatbread Melts
Frozen Appetizers and Snacks
Frozen Breakfast Foods


Chapter 8: Global Marketplace
Key Issues
International Dairy Overview
The Ups and Downs of Global Milk Prices
Milk Made Into Cheese
Prices Rebound
USDA’s Wrap Up for 2009
Forecast for the Global Cheese Market
Global Cheese Data: Past, Present and Future
Figure 8-1: Global Cheese Production, by Milk Type, 2005
U.S. Leads in Global Cheese Production
Figure 8-2: Share of Global Cheese Production, by Top-10 Countries, 2009
Look at the Trend, Not the Actual Figures
Table 8-1: Cheese Production: Summary for Select Countries, 2005-2010
Table 8-2: Cheese Consumption: Summary for Select Countries, 2005-2010
Table 8-3: Cheese Imports: Summary for Select Countries, 2005-2010
Table 8-4: Cheese Exports: Summary for Select Countries, 2005-2010
Per Capita Consumption
A Note on the States’ Northern Neighbors
Quebec Cheesemakers Celebrate
Canadians Love Cheddar
Import and Export Details
U.S. Exports and Imports
Share of World Cheese Exports
American Specialty Cheeses in Europe
Table 8-5: Top-20 U.S. Export Markets, 2008
Table 8-6: U.S. Share of World Cheese Exports, 1990-2008
Global Competitive Landscape
Overview
A Global Note on Process Cheese
Global Process Cheese Growth Keeps Cheddar Volumes Steady
Competitive Profile: Agropur Cooperative, Longueil, Quebec, Canada
Overview
North and South American Expansion Efforts
More U.S. Additions
A Short 18 Months in Drummondville
Recent Innovations
Competitive Profile: Arla Foods amba, Viby, Denmark
Overview
Buying and Selling Businesses to Grow Stronger in Dairy
Middle East: Stay Away Danes
Is the Meadow Still Green in Iowa?
Investing in Wisconsin-made Cheese
Competitive Profile: Bongrain SA, Viroflay, France
Overview
Growing Business in Europe
Competitive Profile: Fonterra Cooperative Group Ltd., Auckland, New Zealand
Overview
Dedicated to the Middle East and Asia
Cheese for Asians
Figure 8-3: Chesdale Chocolate Cheese
Mostly an Ingredients Business in the States
Recent Innovations
Figure 8-4: The Perfect Grater
Figure 8-5: Weight Watchers Cheese & Cracker Snack Packs
Competitive Profile: Fromageries Bel SA, Paris, France
Overview
Purchasing Successful Cheese Brands
Targeting the States
Innovation through Flavor
Convenience Packaging
Competitive Profile: Emmi AG, Lucerne, Switzerland
Overview
Growing in Italy and France
Acquiring Wisconsin Cheesemaker
Management Reorganization
Extending the Aging Cave
Already Out of the Cave
Figure 8-6: Reibkäse
Innovations Introduced at Anuga 2009
New Raclette
Cheese Platters
Figure 8-7: Emmi Cheese Platters
Process Cheese Lives and Livens Up
Figure 8-8: Emmi Swiss Originals Assortment
Competitive Profile: Groupe Lactalis, Laval, France
Overview
New Products
Figure 8-9: Steak de Fromage
Competitive Profile: Saputo, Inc., Saint Léonard, Quebec, Canada
Overview
Growth Through Efficient Acquisitions
Recent U.S. Purchases
Expanding Overseas
Cheese R&D Efforts
Specialty Cheese Line Extensions
Lactose-Free Cheese
Competitive Profile: Valio Ltd., Helsinki, Finland
Overview
Value-Added Innovations
Lactose-free Cheese
Name Change in States to Strengthen Valio Name Overseas
Trends and Innovations
An Overview from Anuga 2009
Ethnic and Combination Flavors in Process Cheese
Figure 8-10: Lactima Exclusive
Figure 8-11: Bergpracht Ethnic Spreads
Single-Serve/On-the-Go Packaging
Figure 8-12: Cheez’ Pucks
Figure 8-13: Snackateers
Convenience Packaging
Figure 8-14: Primula Deli Soft Cheese
Figure 8-15: Eru Cheese Spread
Figure 8-16: Pilgrims Choice Truckles
Addition of Functional Ingredients
Breaded, No-Melt Cheese as Meat Substitute
Figure 8-17: Saganaki
Figure 8-18: Hot Heart
Easy Fondue Kits
Figure 8-19: Knirps OfenKäse
Lactose-Free
Figure 8-20: Minus L
Lower Fat
Figure 8-21: Scottish Pride Light
Sustainable (Organic, Fair-Trade, Etc.)
Substituting Animal Fat with Vegetable Fat
Figure 8-22: Alto
Healthy Pizza


Chapter 9: The Consumer
Key Issues
Consumption Trends
Per Capita Consumption of Natural Cheese
Table 9-1: Total U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Natural Cheese, in Weight, by Variety, 1988, 1998 and 2008
Figure 9-1: Total U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Natural Cheese, in Weight, by Variety, 1988, 1998 and 2008
Mozzarella and Other Italian Gain Share from Cheddar
Table 9-2: Total U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Natural Cheese, Percent Share, by Variety, 1988, 1998 and 2008
Figure 9-2: Total U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Natural Cheese, Percent Share, by Variety, 2008
Other American Cheese Consumption Share Increases
Table 9-3: Total U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Natural American Cheese, Percent Share, by Variety, 1988, 1998 and 2008
Figure 9-3: Total U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Natural American Cheese, Percent Share, by Variety, 2008
Consumption of All Natural Italian Cheeses Is Up
Table 9-4: Total U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Natural Italian Cheese, in Weight, by Variety, 19988, 1998 and 2008
Table 9-5: Total U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Natural Italian Cheese, Percent Share, by Variety, 1988, 1998 and 2008
Figure 9-4: Total U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Natural Italian Cheese, Percent Share, by Variety, 2008
Hispanic Cheese Per Capita Consumption Doubles from 98 to 08
Table 9-6: Total U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Other Natural Cheese, in Weight, by Variety, 1988, 1998 and 2008
Table 9-7: Total U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Other Natural Cheese, Percent Share, by Variety, 1988, 1998 and 2008
Figure 9-5: Total U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Other Natural Cheese, Percent Share, by Variety, 2008
Experian Simmons Consumer Usage Analysis
Experian Simmons Consumer Survey
Trends in Natural Cheese Usage
By Fat Content
Table 9-8: U.S. Households Using Natural Cheese: Comparing Fat Contents, by Percent, 2005-2009
By Form
Table 9-9: U.S. Households Using Natural Cheese: Comparing Form, by Percent, 2005-2009
By Variety
Table 9-10: U.S. Households Using Natural Cheese: Comparing Variety, by Percent, 2005-2009
Specialty Blended Cheese
Table 9-11: U.S. Households Using Select Specialty Blended Cheeses: Comparing Form, by Percent, 2005-2009
Using Demographic Indices
Populations Using Any Natural Cheese
Table 9-12: U.S. Household Demographics that Favor and Resist Use of Any Natural Cheese, by Index, 2009
Fat Content as Attraction or Deterrent
Table 9-13: : U.S. Demographics that Favor and Resist Use of Natural Cheese: Comparing Fat Contents, by Index, 2009
What Forms of Cheese are Preferred by Different Demographics
Table 9-14 U.S. Demographics that Favor and Resist Use of Natural Cheese: Comparing Forms, by Index, (Wedge, Chunk or Stick; Shredded; Sliced), 2009
Table 9-15: U.S. Demographics that Favor and Resist Use of Natural Cheese: Comparing Forms, by Index, (String; Round; Miniature — Waxed or Wrapped), 2009
What Varieties of Cheese are Preferred by Different Demographics
Table 9-16: U.S. Demographics that Favor and Resist Use of Natural Cheese: Comparing Varieties, by Index, (Blue, Brie/Camembert, Cheddar and Colby), 2009
Table 9-17: U.S. Demographics that Favor and Resist Use of Natural Cheese: Comparing Varieties, by Index, (Feta, Gouda, Havarti and Jarlsberg), 2009
Table 9-18: U.S. Demographics that Favor and Resist Use of Natural Cheese: Comparing Varieties, by Index, (Monterey Jack, Mozzarella, Muenster and Parmesan/Romano), 2009
Table 9-19: U.S. Demographics that Favor and Resist Use of Natural Cheese: Comparing Varieties, by Index, (Pepper Jack, Provolone, Ricotta and Swiss), 2009
Consumer Attitudes and Opinions
Innovation Will Drive Per Capita Cheese Consumption
Consumer Attitudes and Opinions Favoring or Resisting Natural Cheese Use
Table 9-20: U.S. Consumer Attitudes and Opinions of Natural Cheese: Comparing Fat Contents, by Index, 2009
Consumer Considerations When Purchasing a New Food
Americans Love New Products
Healthier Options in Food and Beverage
Natural vs. Organic
But Are They Buying New Products?
Where Do They Decide to Make Purchases?
Consumers Are Looking for Better-For-You Options
Are Cheese Shoppers Brand Loyal?
Cheese Shopper Trivia
The Service Deli Cheese Shopper
What’s Important and What’s Not When Deciding on a Cheese Purchase
The Specialty Food Shopper
The Hispanic Consumer
Figure 9-6: Projected U.S. Population and Hispanic Population Growth, Percent Growth, 2005-2015
Hispanic Population Attitudes
The Term Hispanic Is Not All-Encompassing
National Origins Are Very Diverse, But Mexico Rules
Figure 9-7: U.S. Hispanic Population Breakdown by Country of Origin, Percent Share, 2000
Who Are These “Other Hispanics” Coming to the United States?
Flavor Preferences by Country of Origin
Hispanic Spending
Phone Study Looks at Hispanics’ Attitudes Toward Private Label
Hispanics at All Income Levels Buying Private Brands
Experian Simmons Hispanic Cheese User Highlights
Table 9-21: U.S. Hispanic Households Using Natural Cheese: Comparing Fat Content, Form and Variety, by Index, 2009
The All-American Private Label Consumer
Impact of Income Level on Private Label Purchases
The Sustainable Consumer
Changing Habits
Giving Back
Lower-Fat Cheese Consumer
Some Consumers View Cheese as a Comfort Food
Figure 9-8: Which Salty Snack is Your Favorite, by Generation, 2009
Cheese Evokes the Most Passion Among Different Generations


Chapter 10: Trends & Innovations
Key Issues
Trends Driving Innovation
Beyond Being a Concentrated Source of Milk
The Package Variable
What Goes in the Package
Milk Sourcing
Taste Rules
Better-for-You Is More About Addition than Subtraction
Low-Fat Cheese Development Advancements
Cholesterol-Reduction Technology
Flavoring Goes High Tech
A Few Comments on Probiotic Cheese
New Product Innovations
Private Label: Not Always Innovative, But Always a Good Value
A&P Goes Artisan
Aldi Spreads its Signature
Giant Eagle Goes Gourmet
Kroger Adds Cheese Store Concept
Meijer Markets the Gold
Trader Joe’s Gets Baked
Figure 10-1: Trader Joe’s Fondue Brie
Other Noteworthy Private Label Introductions
Table 10-1: Noteworthy Private Label N&SB Cheese Introductions, 2008-2009
When the Package, Form or Size Are the Innovation
The Many Forms of Mozzarella
Brie Changes Shape, Too
Figure 10-2: Président Brie Log
Smaller Packaging for Upscale Cheeses
Figure 10-3: Roth Käse Great American Cutting Board
Portion Control for Snacking
Figure 10-4: Sonoma Creamy Jack Sensible Gourmet Snacks
Curds: The Original Snacking Cheese
A New Type of Jerky
Sandwich Helpers
Meat Marketers Now Marketing Cheese, Too
Sensational Slices
Weight Management Slices
Figure 10-5: Weight Watchers Cheese Slices
Salad Toppers
Made for the Grill
What’s for Dessert? Cheese
Figure 10-6: Kelly’s Kitchen Pumpkin Pie Bite-Size Cheese Balls
Bold and Beautiful
Figure 10-7: Sartori Bella Vitano
Made in Wisconsin Using Bold Dutch Spice
Figure 10-8: Marieke Clove/Cumin Gouda
The Cheese Came Crumbling Down
Figure 10-9: Alouette Crumbles
Spread It On
Figure 10-10: Alouette Sweet & Spicy Pepper Medley Cheese Spread
Figure 10-11: Kaukauna Extremely Creamy Cheese Spread
Ethnic Spreads
Figure 10-12: Président Spreadable Feta
Exports Arrive
Figure 10-13: Collier’s Welch Cheddar
Figure 10-14: Old Amsterdam Gouda
Many Are Avoiding rBGH, Rather than Going Organic
But Organic Is Still Active…and Sometimes Raw and with Probiotics
Figure 10-15: Next Generation Organic Dairy Probiotic Cheese
Other Organic Roll Outs
Grass-fed Grows
Figure 10-16: Grass Point Farms Grass-fed Cheese
Extra, Extra
Figure 10-17: Borden Essentials String Cheese
With Protective Antioxidants
Figure 10-18: Cabot 50% Reduced Fat Cheddar Cheese with Omega-3
DHA
Sargento: Convenience Drives Innovation
Figure 10-19: Sargento Holiday Cheese Shapes
For Foodservice Only
Making Cheese to Survive
Worth a Mention
And Worth a Lot


Appendix: U.S. Cheesemakers and Marketers

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