The U.S. Men's Market: Examining the Attitudes, Buying Habits and Lifestyles of the Elusive Adult Male Consumer

 
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Published Mar 1, 2005 | 247 Pages | Pub ID: LA1054031

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The U.S. Men’s Market, a new report from Packaged Facts, focuses on an increasingly elusive marketing target—the adult male consumer. The report starts with a demographic overview of the men’s population, including employment and income patterns. It then provides an in-depth look at important social and economic trends affecting the men’s market, such as the postponement of marriage and the continuing evolution in the roles of men in their relationships with women and in the raising of children. The next section of the report begins a comprehensive analysis of the consumer behavior of men, including gender differences in shopping and buying and the impact of age on the consumer behavior of men. The report then provides detailed coverage of the complex segmentation within the U.S. men’s market. One chapter assesses the impact of cultural and geographic factors on the consumer behavior of men. Another chapter reviews the consumer behavior of single men, with a particular emphasis on the sought-after younger male consumer. A separate chapter is devoted to the consumer behavior of married men and focuses on the role of fathers in the family. An analysis of marketing and advertising trends and media usage in the men’s market is provided. The final section of the report includes a projection of the buying power of male consumers and an assessment of strategic trends and opportunities in the men’s market.

Radical changes in the role of women in society over the past four decades inevitably have caused corresponding changes in the position of men in the workplace, their relationships with women, and their involvement in family life. The blurring of strict gender differences in roles and relationships has a significant impact on consumer behavior in 21st century America. For example, as more and more married men take on child-rearing and household chores traditionally reserved for women, assumptions about the participation of men in family purchasing decisions need to be revisited. As younger single men become less concerned about modeling themselves after traditional male stereotypes, marketing strategies need to be adjusted.

Report Methodology
The information in The U.S. Men’s Market is based on both primary and secondary research. Primary research involved interviews with experts, public relations and industry analysts in firms that specialize in ethnic market research. Secondary research entailed data-gathering from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature.

About the Authors
Dr. Robert Brown and Ms. Ruth Washton have written more than 20 Packaged Facts reports analyzing demographic trends and marketing strategies in key consumer segments. Topics have ranged from kids to mature consumers to multicultural groups such as Hispanics and African Americans. Dr. Brown and Ms. Washton have co-authored several Financial Times Business Reports on strategic business issues and have provided market and competitor intelligence studies for clients in a variety of industries. Dr. Brown has a B.S. from Georgetown University and a Ph.D. degree from The George Washington University. Ms. Washton has a B.A from Skidmore College and an M.A. from the State University of New York.

What You’ll Get in this Report
Identify the ways men differ from women in the way they shop and buy. Find out whether the political and cultural gap between “Red” and “Blue” parts of the United States matters in marketing to men. Discover how marketers are attempting to capture the attention of increasingly hard-to-reach younger men. Learn about how men fit into consumer decisions made within the American family.

Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

How You Will Benefit from this Report
If your company is interested in reaching the elusive adult male consumer, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight about men not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current demographic profile of the U.S. adult male population. Contributing to that understanding will be a complete analysis of data from published and trade sources, and in-depth examinations of the economic and societal trends that influence the consumer behaviors of this large and influential segment of the population.

This report will help:

  • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for men.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for products targeting the adult male consumer.
  • Advertising agencies to develop messages and images that compel men to purchase these products.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.

Chapter 1 Executive Summary
  • Introduction
    • Background
    • Overview of Report

  • Scope and Methodology
    • Market Definition
    • Methodology

  • Size of Population
    • Men’s Population Younger than Women’s
    • Over-18 Male Population Less Diverse than Younger Males
    • Younger Men More Multicultural
    • Male-Female Ratio Differs Substantially Across States and Localities

  • Economic and Social Profile
    • Average Income of Men Peaks in Late 50s
    • Men Still Have Much Higher Income than Women
    • 27 Million Men Earn 50K or More
    • Men Remain More Likely than Women to Be in Labor Force
    • Many High-Paying Occupations Dominated by Men
    • Most Men Marry at Some Point in Their Lives
    • Approximately 4.6 Million Males Live in Unmarried Opposite-Sex Couples
    • Significant Number of Men Live as Members of Same-Sex Couples

  • Social and Economic Trends Affecting the Men’s Market
    • Men’s Population Growing Faster than Women’s
    • Population of Older Men Will Show Most Growth
    • More Men Marry Later or Do Not Marry At All
    • Divorce Much More Common
    • Women Close Educational Gap with Men
    • Fewer Men Are Sole Breadwinners
    • Men Losing Earnings Superiority

  • Overview of Consumer Behavior of Men
    • Men Shop When They Have To, Women Shop Because They Like To
    • Men Like Shopping with Women—But Women Would Rather Be Left Alone
    • Men Depend More on Brand Names
    • Vast Differences in the Way Men and Women Behave in Stores
    • Research Shows Men Shopping More
    • Younger Men Like to Shop
    • Younger Men Driven by Fashion
    • Internet Affects Consumer Behavior of Men

  • Red vs. Blue: Should It Matter to Marketers?
    • Blue States Control Majority of Household Income
    • Men in Southwest Most Closely Affiliated with Religion
    • Conservative Men Are Joiners
    • Entertainment Choices of Men Affected by Religious Orientation
    • LA Men Enjoy Shopping the Most
    • Southern Men Most Likely to See Shopping as Family Activity
    • Fashion-Forward Men Concentrated in Metro Areas
    • Men in New York and Chicago Most Diet-Conscious
    • Vegetarians Scarce in Heartland
    • Snacking Habits Vary

  • Single Men
    • Population of Single Men Totals 37 Million
    • Never-Married Men in 25- to 44-Year Old Age Group Largest Segment of
    • Single Men’s Market
    • Average After-Tax Income of Affluent Single Male Consumers Tops $69,000
    • Wide Gender Differences in Consumer Spending Patterns by Affluent Singles
    • Younger Men Most Attracted to E-commerce
    • Use of Personal-Care Products Varies
    • Young Urban Singles Set Fashion Trends
    • Younger Men Prime Customers for New Electronics Products

  • Family Men
    • Men Still Tend to Marry Younger Women
    • Number of Full-Time Fathers Tops 30 Million
    • More Men Become Fathers Later in Life
    • Today’s Fathers More Involved with Children
    • Balancing Work and Family High Priority for Gen-X Dads
    • More than 5 Million Men Support Families with Stay-at-Home Moms
    • Number of “Ozzie-and-Harriet” Families Grew in Late 1990s
    • More Gen-X Dads Have Traditional Views on Role of Women
    • Boomer Fathers More Irritated by “Pester Power” of Kids
    • Gen-X Dads More Tolerant of Advertising to Kids
    • Younger Dads Like Shopping More

  • Media
    • Younger Men Look to Magazines
    • New Magazines Focus on Shopping
    • Television Less Important to Younger Men
    • Guys Still Watch Sports
    • Cable TV Choices Analyzed
    • Radio Highly Popular among Men
    • Older Men Turn on the Radio for News and Talk, Younger Men for Music
    • Men Use Online Media

  • Advertising and Marketing Strategies
    • Men Have Little Patience with Television Commercials
    • Men’s Advertising Predicated on Age Groups and Life Stages
    • Advertisers Look Beyond Traditional Media to Reach Younger Men
    • Grassroots Marketing Reaches Critical Mass
    • Video Games Seen as Next Big Medium for Advertisers
    • Ford Connects with Men Wherever They Go
    • Burger King Targets Elusive Young Men with Internet

  • Size and Growth of the Market
    • Men’s Buying Power Distributed among Many Important Segments
    • Most Buying Power in Hands of 25- to 49-Year-Olds
    • Market Expected to Grow Nearly 25% by 2009
    • Relative Importance of Age Segments Will Shift

  • Strategic Trends and Opportunities
    • American Men Evolve
    • A New Male Consumer Emerges from Blurring of Gender Roles
    • Men's Market Highly Complex
    • New Opportunities Generated by Evolving Male Consumer
    • New Views of Masculinity Vex Marketers

  • Section 1 Demographic Overview

Chapter 2 The Men’s Population Today

  • Size of Population
    • U.S. Men’s Population Tops 105 Million
    • Table 2-1: Size of Men’s Population, by Age Group, 2003
    • Male Population Skewed toward Younger Age Groups
    • Table 2-2: Distribution of Adult Population by Age Group and Gender,2003
    • Table 2-3: Distribution of Adult Population by Gender, 2003

  • Race and Ethnicity
    • Over-18 Male Population Less Diverse than Younger Males
    • Table 2-4: Male Population by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2003
    • Younger Men More Multicultural
    • Table 2-5: Men’s Population by Age Group, Non-Hispanic Whites vs.
    • Others, 2003
    • Foreign-Born Most Prevalent among 25- to 39-Year-Old Men
    • Table 2-6: Men’s Population by Age Group, Foreign-Born vs. Native-Born, 2003
    • Table 2-7: Region of Birth of Foreign-Born Men, 2003
    • Table 2-8: Region of Birth of Foreign-Born Men by Age Group, 2003

  • Geographic Distribution
    • Men More Likely to Live in the West
    • Table 2-9: Distribution of Adult Population by Region, 2004
    • Men Less Likely to Live in Central Cities
    • Table 2-10: Distribution of Adult Population by Metropolitan vs. Non-Metropolitan Residence, 2004
    • One in Five Men Lives in California and Texas
    • Table 2-11: States with Largest Men’s Population, 2003
    • Male-Female Ratio Differs Substantially Across States and Localities
    • Table 2-12: Male-Female Ratios by Selected Geographic Locations, 2000

Chapter 3 Economic and Social Profile

  • Income
    • Average Income of Men Peaks in Late 50s
    • Figure 3-1: Average Income of Men by Age Group, 2003
    • Gen-X Men Command Largest Share of Aggregate Income
    • Table 3-1: Mean Income of Men’s Population by Age Group, 2003
    • Figure 3-2: Distribution of Aggregate Income of Men by Age Group
    • Married-Couple Households Have Highest Household Income
    • Table 3-2: Mean Income by Household Type, 2003
    • Men Still Have Much Higher Income than Women
    • Table 3-3: Mean Income of Men and Women by Age Group, 2003
    • Table 3-4: Distribution of Aggregate Income of People Aged 18+ Years
    • by Age Group and Gender, 2003
    • 27 Million Men Earn 50K or More
    • Table 3-5: Distribution of Income of Men, 2003
    • Table 3-6: Distribution of Income of 18- to 49-Year-Old Men by Age Group, 2003
    • Table 3-7: Distribution of Income of 50+ Men by Age Group, 2003
    • Table 3-8: High-Income Men by Age Group, 2003

  • Men in the Workplace
    • Men Remain More Likely than Women to Be in Labor Force
    • Table 3-9: Labor Force Participation of Men, by Age Group, 2004
    • Table 3-10: Full-Time and Part-Time Employment of the 25+ Population,
    • Men vs. Women, 2004
    • Many Gender Differences Seen in Occupational Patterns
    • Table 3-11: Occupations of Men and Women, 2004
    • Many High-Paying Occupations Dominated by Men
    • Table 3-12: Percent of Men in Selected Occupations, 20041
    • Nearly 5.8 Million Men Earn $100K and Over
    • Table 3-13: Distribution of Earnings of People under 65 Years Old,
    • Men vs. Women, 2003
    • Table 3-14: Distribution of Full-Time, Year-Round Workers under
    • 65 Years Old, Men vs Women, 2003.
    • Earnings More Important Source of Income for Men than Women
    • Table 3-15: Sources of Income, Men vs. Women

  • Household and Family Structure
    • Younger Men as Likely to Live with Parents as Spouse
    • Table 3-16: Living Arrangements of Younger Men by Age Group, 2003
    • Figure 3-3: Percent of 25- to 34-Year-Olds without Own Children Living in Parents’ Household in 2003, Men vs. Women
    • Most Men Marry at Some Point in Their Lives
    • Table 3-17: Marital Status of Men by Age Group, 2003
    • Approximately 4.6 Million Males Live in Unmarried Opposite-Sex Couples
    • Table 3-18: Characteristics of Male Unmarried Partners and Married
    • Spouses, 2003
    • Significant Number of Men Live as Members of Same-Sex Couples

  • Social Indicators
    • Educational Achievement Reflects Generational Experiences
    • Table 3-19: Educational Attainment of Men by Age Group, 2003
    • Men Less Likely to Vote for Democrats
    • Table 3-20: Voting Participation by Age Group and Gender, 2002
    • Men Become More Conservative with Age Table 3-21: Selected Social Values of Men by Age Group

Chapter 4 Social and Economic Trends Affecting the

  • Men’s Market
  • Population Growth Trends
    • Men’s Population Growing Faster than Women’s
    • Figure 4-1: Percent Males in Population 20 Years Old and Over,2000-2050
    • Men’s Population Will Increase 6.1% by 2009
    • Table 4-1: Projected Growth in Men’s Population, 2004-2009
    • Population of Older Men Will Show Most Growth
    • Table 4-2: Projected Growth in Men’s Population by Age Group, 2000-2020
    • Multicultural Groups Will Grow in Importance
    • Table 4-3: Projected Growth in Multicultural Population by Age Group, 2000-2020

  • Social Trends
    • Men Marry Later
    • Figure 4-2: Median Age at First Marriage for Men 15 Years and Over, 1970 to 2003
    • More Men Do Not Marry at All
    • Table 4-4: Percent of Men Never Married by Age Group, 1970 vs. 2003
    • Divorce Much More Common
    • Figure 4-3: Percent of Men Divorced and Separated, 1970-2003
    • Figure 4-4: Number of Divorced and Separated Men, 1970 vs. 2003
    • Women Close Educational Gap with Men
    • Figure 4-5: Percent of Men and Women 25 Years Old and Over Who Have Completed College, 1970-2003
    • Table 4-5: Percent of College Graduates by Age Group, Men vs. Women, 2003
    • Fewer Men Have More Education than Spouses
    • Figure 4-6: Percent of Married Couples with Husband Having More
    • Education than Wife, 1981 vs. 2003
    • Fewer Men Are Sole Breadwinners
    • Figure 4-7: Percent of Married Couples with Husband Only in Labor Force, 1986 vs. 2003
    • Men Losing Earnings Superiority
    • Figure 4-8: Mean Earnings of Men as Percent of Mean Earnings of Women, 1970-2003

Section 3 Understanding the Consumer Behavior of Men

  • Chapter 5 Overview of Consumer Behavior of Men
  • Shopping Behavior: Men vs. Women
    • Men Are Primary Shoppers in One in Five Households
    • Figure 5-1: Gender of Primary Shopper in Household
    • Men Shop When They Have To, Women Shop Because They Like To
    • Table 5-1: Attitudes toward Shopping, Men vs. Women by Age Group
    • Gender Gap among Shoppers Narrower at Strip Malls
    • Table 5-2: Shopped at Malls in Last 4 Weeks, Men vs. Women by Age Group
    • Men Like Shopping with Women—But Women Would Rather Be Left Alone
    • Table 5-3: Shopping as a Social Event, Men vs. Women by Age Group
    • Men Less Driven by Sales and Specials
    • Table 5-4: Price Sensitivity, Men vs. Women by Age Group
    • Men Depend More on Brand Names
    • Table 5-5: Brand Loyalty and Awareness, Men vs. Women by Age Group
    • Vast Differences in the Way Men and Women Behave in Stores
    • Table 5-6: In-Store Behavior, Men vs. Women by Age Group
    • Research Shows Men Shopping More
    • Drug Stores See More Men in Aisles
    • Today’s Men Do More Grocery Shopping
    • Older Men More Inclined to Shop for Groceries
    • Figure 5-2: Percent of Adults Believing “Shopping for Groceries Is a Bore,”
    • Men vs. Women by Age Group
    • Supermarkets Still Designed for Women

  • Age and the Consumer Behavior of Men
    • Younger Men Like to Shop
    • Figure 5-3: Percent of Men Shopping Frequently, by Age Group
    • Figure 5-4: Percent of Men Who Really Enjoy Any Kind of Shopping,
    • by Age Group
    • Generational Shift Seen in Men’s Shopping Patterns
    • Gen Y Men Turn to Mass Retailers
    • Younger Men Driven by Fashion
    • Table 5-7: Men’s Attitudes toward Fashion by Age Group
    • Older Men Spend Less on Toiletries
    • Figure 5-5: Percent of Men Who “Spend a Lot of Money” on Toiletries/Cosmetics, by Age Group

  • Men and the Internet
    • Age Is Major Factor in Internet Use by Men
    • Figure 5-6: Percent of Men Saying “Computers Confuse Me, I’ll Never Get Used to Them,” by Age Group
    • Figure 5-7: Percent of Men Using Online Service by Age Group
    • Lifestyles of Gen-Y Men Transformed by Internet
    • Table 5-8: Impact of the Internet on Men’s Lifestyles, by Age Group
    • Internet Affects Consumer Behavior of Men
    • Table 5-9: Impact of the Internet on Consumer Behavior of Men,
    • by Age Group
    • Gender Differences in Internet Usage
    • Table 5-10: Online Activities, Men vs. Women

Chapter 6 Red vs. Blue: Should It Matter to Marketers?

  • Introduction
  • Background
  • Scope of Analysis

  • Demographic Highlights
    • Higher-Income, Better Educated Men Found in Blue Regions
    • Table 6-1: Demographic Profile of Men by Region
    • Religious Conservative and Secular Men Divide along Regional Lines
    • Table 6-2: Geographic Location, Religious vs. Secular Men
    • Table 6-3: Demographic Profile, Religious vs. Secular Men
    • Blue States Control Majority of Household Income
    • Figure 6-1: Aggregate Household Income, Blue States vs. Red States

  • Core Values Compared
    • Men in Southwest Most Closely Affiliated with Religion
    • Table 6-4: Men’s Attitudes toward Religion by Region
    • Social Values Show Regional Differences—with Some Surprises
    • Table 6-5: Selected Social and Political Attitudes of Men, by Region
    • Views on Environmental Issues Complex
    • Table 6-6: Attitudes of Men toward Environmental Issues, by Region
    • Table 6-7: Involvement of Men in Recycling, by Region
    • Fewer Differences in Views on Social Tolerance
    • Table 6-8: Degree of Social Tolerance by Men, by Region

  • Lifestyle Differences and Similarities
    • Conservative Men Are Joiners
    • Table 6-9: Memberships, Religious vs. Secular Men
    • Midwestern Men Join the Most
    • Table 6-10: Men’s Memberships by Region
    • Many Sports Cross Regional Boundaries
    • Table 6-11: Most Popular Participatory Sports
    • Leisure Activities Vary Widely
    • Table 6-12: Most Popular Leisure Activities of Men, by Region
    • Entertainment Choices of Men Affected by Religious Orientation
    • Table 6-13: Attendance at Entertainment Events, Religious Conservative vs. Secular Men

  • Regional Differences and Similarities in Consumer Behavior of Men
    • LA Men Enjoy Shopping the Most
    • Table 6-14: Attitudes of Men toward the Importance of Shopping, by Region
    • Many Regional Differences in Price Sensitivity of Men
    • Table 6-15: Price Sensitivity of Men, by Region
    • Southern Men Most Likely to See Shopping as Family Activity
    • Table 6-16: Shopping as a Social Event for Men, by Region
    • Southern Men Most Interested in Buying Products Made in America
    • Figure 6-2: Percent of Men Preferring to Buy Products Made in America, by Region
    • Fashion-Forward Men Concentrated in Metro Areas
    • Table 6-17: Attitudes of Men toward Fashion and Style, by Region
    • Men in New York Most Focused on Clothes Shopping
    • Table 6-18: Attitudes of Men toward Shopping and Buying Clothes, by Region
    • Brand Awareness Analyzed
    • Table 6-19: Attitudes of Men toward Apparel Brands, by Region
    • Regional Variations in Use of Personal-Care Products
    • Table 6-20: Use of Personal-Care Products by Men, by Region
    • Men in New York and Chicago Most Diet-Conscious
    • Table 6-21: Attitudes of Men toward Dieting, by Region
    • Vegetarians Scarce in Heartland
    • Figure 6-3: Percent of Men Who Are Vegetarians, by Region
    • Snacking Habits
    • Table 6-22: Attitudes of Men toward Foods, by Region

    Chapter 7 Single Men

    • Overview
      • Population of Single Men Totals 37 Million
      • Table 7-1: Number of Single Men by Age Group, 2004
      • Single Men More Multicultural
      • Table 7-2: Number of Single Men by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2004
      • Divorced Men Have Highest Incomes
      • Table 7-3: Mean Income of Single Men by Age Group, 2003
      • Never-Married Men in 25- to 44-Year Old Age Group Largest Segment of
      • Single Men’s Market
      • Table 7-4: Aggregate Income of Single Men by Age Group and Marital
      • History, 2003
      • Divorced Men Have Highest Incomes, Regardless of Race and Hispanic
      • Origin
      • Table 7-5: Mean Income of Single Men by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2003

    • Affluent Single Men
      • Average After-Tax Income of Affluent Single Male Consumers Tops $69,000
      • Table 7-6: Characteristics of Affluent Single Consumer Units, Men vs. Women, 2002-2003
      • Wide Gender Differences in Consumer Spending Patterns by Affluent Singles
      • Table 7-7: Consumer Expenditures of Affluent Single Men and Women, 2002-2003

    • Highlights of Consumer Behavior of Single Men
      • Single Men Outshop Married Men
      • Table 7-8: Shopping Profile of Single Men by Age Group and Ethnicity
      • Younger Men Most Attracted to E-commerce
      • Table 7-9: Online Shopping Profile of Single Men by Age Group and Ethnicity
      • Beverage Consumption of Single Men Shows Major Differences acrosss
      • Age and Regional Lines
      • Table 7-10: Consumer Profile of Single Men by Age Group and Ethnicity: Beverages
      • Table 7-11: Consumer Profile of Single Men by Geographic Region: Beverages
      • Use of Personal-Care Products Varies
      • Table 7-12: Consumer Profile of Single Men by Age Group and Ethnicity: Personal-Care Products
      • Young Urban Singles Set Fashion Trends
      • Table 7-13: Consumer Profile of Single Men by Age Group and Ethnicity: Apparel
      • Table 7-14: Consumer Profile of Single Men by Region: Apparel
      • Single Men More Favorable toward Foreign Cars
      • Table 7-15: Consumer Profile of Single Men by Age Group and Ethnicity: Automotive
      • Younger Men Prime Customers for New Electronics Products
      • Figure 7-1: Percent of Single Men Who “Love to Buy New Gadgets and Appliances”
      • Table 7-16: Consumer Profile of Single Men by Age Group and Ethnicity: Consumer Electronics

    Chapter 8 Family Men

    • Marriage Patterns
      • Most Men Marry within Own Race
      • Table 8-1: Race and Hispanic Origin Differences in Married Couples, 2003
      • Men Still Tend to Marry Younger Women
      • Table 8-2: Age Difference of Married Couples, 2003

    • Profile of Fathers Today
    • Number of Full-Time Fathers Tops 30 Million
      • Table 8-3: Number of Full-Time Fathers by Family Type
      • Single Dads Become More Prominent
      • Table 8-4: Growth in Number of Family Households Headed by Single Fathers, 1970-2003
      • More Men Become Fathers Later in Life
      • Table 8-5: Birth Rates by Age of Father, 1980 vs. 2002
      • Men Spend Significant Amount of Time with Children
      • Table 8-6: Hours per Day Spent Caring for Household Children, Men vs. Women, 2003
      • Table 8-7: Hours per Day Spent Caring for Household Children under 13 as Secondary Activity, by Type of Activity, Men vs. Women, 2003
      • Today’s Fathers More Involved with Children
      • Balancing Work and Family High Priority for Gen-X Dads
      • Age of Children and Stage of Life Affects Role and Attitudes of Gen-X and Boomer Dads
      • Table 8-8: Involvement with Kids, Gen-X vs. Boomer Fathers with Children under 18 at Home
      • Table 8-9: Attitudes toward Work and Family, Gen-X vs. Boomer Fathers with Children under 18 at Home
      • “Superdads” Feel Stress
      • “Mr. Moms” Remain Scarce
      • Table 8-10: Parents Out of Labor Force All 52 Weeks Previous Year,
      • Men vs. Women
      • More than 5 Million Men Support Families with Stay-at-Home Moms
      • Table 8-11: Selected Characteristics of Families with Stay-at-Home Moms
      • Number of “Ozzie-and-Harriet” Families Grew in Late 1990s
      • Table 8-12: Percent of Married Couples with Stay-at-Home Moms, 1994-2003
      • More Gen-X Dads Have Traditional Views on Role of Women Figure 8-1: Percent Saying “A Woman’s Place is in the Home,” Gen-X vs. Boomer Fathers

      Highlights of Consumer Behavior
      • Introduction
      • Boomer Fathers More Irritated by “Pester Power” of Kids
      • Table 8-13: Attitudes of Gen-X and Boomer Fathers toward Kids and Consumerism
      • Gen-X Dads More Tolerant of Advertising to Kids
      • Table 8-14: Attitudes of Gen-X and Boomer Fathers toward Kids and Advertising
      • Younger Dads Like Shopping More
      • Table 8-15: Shopping Profile of Gen-X and Boomer Fathers
      • Online Shopping Attracts More Boomer Dads
      • Table 8-16: Online Consumer Profile of Gen-X and Boomer Fathers
      • Gen-X Dads Less Conservative about Financial Matters
      • Table 8-17: Attitudes toward Personal Finance of Gen-X and Boomer Fathers
      • Financial Assets Increase with Age
      • Table 8-18: Consumer Profile of Gen-X and Boomer Fathers: Personal Finance
      • Home Improvement Strategies Cross Generations
      • Table 8-19: Consumer Profile of Gen-X and Boomer Fathers: Home Improvement

      Section 3 Marketing to Men

    Chapter 9 Media Usage

    • Print Media
      • Younger Men Like Magazines
      • Table 9-1: Attitudes of Men toward Print Media by Age Group
      • Popular Magazines Listed
      • Table 9-2: Magazines Most Popular with Men
      • Preferences Vary by Age
      • Table 9-3: Magazines Most Popular with Men by Age Group
      • Some Magazines Have Broad Appeal
      • Table 9-4: Magazines Most Popular with Men across Age Groups
      • New Magazines Focus on Shopping
      • Sync Magazine Covers "Tech-Tainment"

    • Television
      • Television Less Important to Younger Men
      • Table 9-5: Attitudes of Men toward Television by Age Group
      • Table 9-6: Subscription to Cable Television by Age Group
      • TV Competes for Younger Men’s Attention
      • Program Preferences Vary Widely
      • Table 9-7: Primetime Television Viewing Habits of Men by Age Group
      • CBS Top Network for Older Men, Fox for Younger Males
      • Table 9-8: Networks Viewed by Men by Age Group
      • Guys Still Watch Sports
      • Table 9-9: TV Sports Watched Frequently by Men by Age Group
      • Cable TV Choices Analyzed
      • Table 9-10: Cable TV Services Popular with Men
      • Table 9-11: Cable TV Services Popular with Men by Age Group
      • Table 9-12: Cable TV Services Popular with Men across Age Groups
      • Spike TV Launches First Network for Men
      • New Wave of Programming Targets Men

    • Radio
      • Radio Highly Popular among Men
      • Table 9-13: Attitudes of Men toward Radio by Age Group
      • Older Men Turn on the Radio for News and Talk, Younger Men for Music
      • Table 9-14: Radio Formats Popular with Men by Age Group

    • Online Media
      • Younger Men Use Online Media
      • Figure 9-1: Use of Online Media, Men vs. Women
      • Table 9-15: Impact of Internet on Media Usage by Men by Age Group
      • Entertainment Sites Favored by Young Men
      • Chapter 10 Advertising and Marketing Strategies

    • Overview
      • Older Men Negative toward Advertising
      • Table 10-1: Attitudes of Men toward Advertising in General by Age Group
      • Men Have Little Patience with Television Commercials
      • Table 10-2: Attitudes of Men toward Television Advertising
      • Print Ads Receive Less Attention
      • Table 10-3: Attitudes of Men toward Print Advertising
      • Men’s Advertising Predicated on Age Groups and Life Stages
      • Advertisers Look Beyond Traditional Media to Reach Younger Men
      • Grassroots Marketing Reaches Critical Mass
      • Video Games Seen as Next Big Medium for Advertisers

    • Examples of Marketing Campaigns
      • Ford Connects with Men Wherever They Go
      • Burger King Targets Elusive Young Men with Internet
      • Gap Looks to Non-Traditional Media to Reach Men
      • Nintendo Takes Bold Approach to Attract Older Players
      • Coke and Pepsi Compete for the Diet-Conscious Male Consumer
      • Nivea for Men Targets Younger Men

    • Section 4 Market Trends

    Chapter 11 Size and Growth of the Market

    • Overview of Key Market Segments
      • Multicultural Men Represent Fast-Growing Market Segment
      • Table 11-1: Aggregate Income of Men by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2003
      • Table 11-2: Growth in Aggregate Income of Men by Race and Hispanic
      • Origin, 1990 vs. 2003
      • Married Men Are Largest Market Segment
      • Table 11-3: Aggregate Income of Men by Age and Marital Status, 2003
      • Table 11-4: Aggregate Income of Men Rank Ordered by Age and Marital Status, 2003
      • Gen-X and Younger Boomers Key Segments
      • Table 11-5: Mean Income of Men’s Population by Generational Age Group, 2003
      • Gay Men Represent Substantial Consumer Segment

    • Buying Power of Men
      • Buying Power Used to Measure Size of Market
      • Men’s Buying Power Distributed among Many Important Segments
      • Table 11-6: Buying Power of Men by Market Segment, 2004
      • Most Buying Power in Hands of 25- to 49-Year-Olds
      • Table 11-7: Buying Power of Men by Age Group, 2004
      • Market Expected to Grow Nearly 25% by 2009
      • Table 11-8: Projected Growth in Buying Power of Men, 2004-2009

    Chapter 12 Strategic Trends and Opportunities

    • American Men Evolve
    • A New Male Consumer Emerges from Blurring of Gender Roles
    • Diversity Drives Men's Market
    • Demographic Trends Will Shift Structure of Men's Market
    • Marketers Will Benefit as More Young Men "Boomerang" Home to Parental Nest
    • New Opportunities Generated by Evolving Male Consumer
    • New Views of Masculinity Vex Marketers
    • Retailers and Marketers Challenged to Answer the Question "What Do Men
    • Want?" . . . When They Shop and Buy
    • Growing Involvement by Men in Home Appliance Purchases Creates Opportunities
    • More Manufacturers Design Home Products with Men in Mind

    Appendix I Geographic Definitions
    Appendix II Addresses of Selected Men’s Market Resources