The U.S. Lawn and Garden Market, 5th Edition

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Published Mar 1, 2003 | 304 Pages | Pub ID: LA770321

Special Offer. Now 25% off the original price of $3000.
The $22 billion U.S. lawn and garden market is currently undergoing epic changes as a tidal wave of shakeout and consolidation sweeps across the industry. It is "survival of the fittest" time for L&G manufacturers, distributors, dealers, retailers, and service providers, with a stagnant economy encountering global overcapacity and a stubborn drought to create punishing competitive conditions. Yet in the face of adversity, the industry as a whole is strong and hanging tough, successfully positioning to meet current challenges and future demand. This 2003 update edition of Packaged Facts' widely popular study of the U.S. lawn and garden market explores in depth the kaleidoscopic shifts in ownership taking place among major L&G marketers and the fierce battles being waged at retail between big boxes and everyone else. It also examines the fundamental future positives that anchor the market: an aging population base, widespread homeownership, a pent-up demand for quality products, and an industry dedicated to overcoming regulatory challenges and technological obstacles. In addition, this study includes a detailed analysis of sales and growth figures for L&G equipment, supplies, and services; five-year projections for these categories; profiles of leading national and top regional marketers; a comprehensive list of new products; and a complete dissection of L&G consumer use patterns.

Report Methodology
The information in The U.S. Lawn and Garden Market is based on both primary and secondary research. Primary research involved on-site examination of the retail milieu, interviews with marketing, public relations and industry analysts within the lawn and garden market and consultants to the industry. Secondary research entailed data-gathering from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature. The analysis of consumer demographics derives from Simmons Market Research Bureau survey data for fall 2002. New product information is gathered via literature research, personal interviews and data compiled by ProductScan, a service of Marketing Intelligence Service Ltd.

The report looks at every segment of the lawn and garden market, examining trends for growth and projecting sales of products through 2007. It analyzes consumer demographics and their current and projected impact on sales of lawn equipment, supplies and lawncare services. It provides up-to-date competitive profiles of marketers of lawn and garden products - including a look at smaller, up-and-coming companies - and discusses the influence of demographic trends as a driver of retail trends. The report also spotlights new products and current distribution trends, and offers readers trends and marketing opportunities within the lawn and garden industry.

What You’ll Get in this Report
Now in its 5th edition, The U.S. Lawn and Garden Market has earned a reputation for being the one, reliable source of data and trends on the lawn and garden - information that is notoriously difficult to track. The report addresses the following segments:

  • The Market (including market size and composition, and projected market growth)
  • The Marketers (including discussions of specific marketer brand and market shares)
  • Competitive Profiles (of the mainstream lawn and garden marketers, specialists and up-and-coming niche players, and analyses of the products they market)
  • Retail Strategies
  • The Consumer (who’s buying what, and where)
  • The Products
  • Trends and Opportunities

Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

Scroll down to see a more detailed outline of the contents of this report.

How You Will Benefit from this Report
If your company is already competing in the lawn and garden market, or is considering making the leap, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current market for lawn and garden products, as well as projected sales and trends through 2007. Contributing to that understanding will be a complete analysis of sales data from published and trade sources, a detailed discussion of the consumer for lawn and garden products based on Simmons data.

This report will help:

  • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for lawn and garden products
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for products in the lawn and garden arenas.
  • Advertising agencies working with clients in lawn and garden industries understand the product buyer to develop messages and images that compel consumers to purchase these products.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.

Chapter 1: Executive Summary

The Overall Market: Equipment, Supplies, and Services

  • Study Methodology
  • Regulation
  • L&G Sales at $22 Billion in 2002
  • Table 1-1: Estimated Overall Retail Sales of the U.S. Lawn and Garden Market: By Category, 1998-2002 (millions of dollars)
  • Growth Patterns by Category
  • L&G Retail Shares
  • Four Macro Factors Will Determine Future Growth
  • L&G Market Projection: $25 Billion by 2007
  • Table 1-2: Projection Retails Sales of the U.S. Lawn and Garden Market by Category: 2003-2007 (millions of dollars)
  • Size of Marketers
  • Generalists vs. Specialists
  • Retail Distribution Channels: Equipment/Supplies
  • Big Boxes on Top

Lawn and Garden Equipment

  • Equipment Category: Three Segments
  • Regulation: EPA Phases I and II
  • CARB Tier 2 Regulations
  • Equipment Sales at $12.7 Billion in 2002
  • OPE Dominates Equipment Dollar Share
  • OPE Unit Shares: Gas-Powered Products
  • Projections: Equipment Over $14 Billion by 2007
  • Table 1-3: Projected Retail Sales of Lawn and Garden Equipment by Product Segment: 2003-2007 (millions of dollars)
  • Top OPE Marketers
  • Top Tools Marketers
  • Top Watering/Spraying Marketers
  • The Competitive Situation: Intense Consolidation/Shakeout
  • Locus of New Product Innovation: Engine Technology
  • Retail Share: Home Centers Rise, Discounters Down
  • Home Centers Benefit From Marketer Alliances, Kmart Troubles
  • Consumer Factors Favoring Ownership: Walk-Behind Mowers

Lawn and Garden Supplies

  • Two Segments: Fertilizers/Growth Media and Pesticides
  • Regulatory Bans and Restrictions
  • Supplies Sales at $5.2 Billion
  • Segment Share: F/GM Leads
  • Projections: Subdued but Positive Growth
  • The Marketers: Scotts Dominates
  • United Industries/Spectrum Brands Suddenly in Second Place
  • How Scotts Maintains Its Dominance
  • Major New Product Trend: Organic/Natural Products
  • Organophosphate Alternatives
  • A Wide Range of Retail Outlets
  • Mass vs. Specialty Retail Share
  • Garden Centers/Nurseries Struggle
  • Demographic Factors Favoring Purchase: All L&G Supplies

Professional Lawncare Services

  • Definition: Treatment, Not Maintenance
  • Prime Selling Points
  • Customized Options
  • Services at $3.9 Billion in 2002
  • Reasons for Slight Growth Slowdown
  • Projections: Strong but Slower Growth
  • Most Firms are Small Independents
  • TruGreen-Chemlawn Dominates
  • Service Users Display Strong Upscale Profile

Chapter 2: The Overall Market

  • Areas Outside Scope

    The Products
    • Three Categories: Equipment, Supplies, and Services
    • Government Regulation
    • The EPA
    • EPA and OPE
    • EPA and Pest Control
    • The Food Quality Protection Act
    • At the State Level
    • At the Local Level

    Market Size, Growth, and Competition

    • Overview: Few Figures to Go On
    • L&G Market Near $22 Billion in 2002
    • Table 2-1: Estimated Overall Retail Sales of the U.S. Lawn and Garden Market: By Category, 1998-2002 (millions of dollars)
    • Growth Patterns: 1998-2002
    • Growth Patterns by Category
    • Sales Share by Product Category
    • L&G Retail Share
    • Figure 2-1: Lawn and Garden Growth by Category, 1998-2002
    • Figure 2-2: Sales Share of Lawn and Garden Market, by Category
    • Table 2-2: Estimated Retail Share of U.S. Lawn and Garden Sales by Outlet Type, 2002
    • Seasonality: Most Sales in Spring and Early Summer
    • Regionality: Even Distribution by Population Patterns

    Factors in Future Growth

    • Overview: Four Macro Factors
    • Positive: The Aging Baby Boomers
    • Table 2-3: U.S. Population, by Age Group, 2000-2010
    • L&G and Middle Age
    • Positive: The Booming Housing Market
    • Sales: New/Existing Homes
    • Table 2-4: Sales of New and Existing Single-Family Homes: 1996-2002 (in thousands)
    • Housing Starts
    • Table 2-5: U.S. Housing Starts: 1996-2002 (in thousands)
    • Why the Sustained Housing Boom?
    • Housing and L&G Market
    • Negative: The Economy
    • 2002-2003: Dazed and Confused
    • The Economy and the L&G Market: Outlook
    • Negative: The Weather
    • Extreme Springs
    • The Global Warming Factor
    • 2001 A Harbinger?
    • Potential Opportunities in Climate Change
    • Cultural Trends: Gardening Popularity Up
    • A Reaction Against Lawns
    • Outdoor Living Trend on the Wane
    • Stay-at-Home Trend Waxing
    • The Hispanic Factor
    • The Regulation Factor
    • The Consolidation Trend Positive
    • Is the Retail Channel Contracting?
    • Evolving L&G Products
    • Biotechnology and L&G

    Projected Market Growth

    • L&G Market to Exceed $25 Billion in 2007
    • Figure 2-3: Projected Growth of Lawn and Garden Market Sales, in Billions, 2003-2007
    • Projected Growth by Category
    • Table 2-6: Projected Retail Sales of the U.S. Lawn and Garden Market by Category: 2003-2007 (millions of dollars)

    The Marketers

    • Size of Marketers
    • Generalists vs. Specialists
    • U.S. vs. Foreign Ownership
    • Major L&G Marketers: Overview
      • Major Marketers: OPE
      • Majors: Tools
      • Majors: Watering/Spraying Equipment
      • Majors: Supplies
      • Majors: Services

    Retail and Distribution

    • Retail Distribution Channels: Equipment/Supplies
    • Anonmalous Retail Distribution: Lawncare Services
    • Distribution Patterns: Direct vs. Intermediary
    • OPE Dealership Distribution
    • Distributors Still Play Vital Role
    • At The Retail Level: Big Boxes on Top
    • The Home Center Concept
    • Home Depot the Leading L&G Retailer
    • Reaching a Limit?
    • Testing New Concepts
    • Home Depot Landscape Supply
    • Downsized HD Stores for Cities
    • From Products to Services
    • Lowe’s Companies, Inc.
    • Wal-Mart and Kmart
    • K-Martha
    • Target
    • Sears
    • Garden Centers/Nurseries
    • Hardware Stores
    • Supermarkets and Drugstores
    • Direct Sales: Mail-Order and Internet

Chapter 3: Lawn and Garden Equipment

  • Government Regulations: Federal Labeling Standards
  • Federal Performance Safety Standards
  • EPA: Phases I and II
  • CARB: Tiers I and II
  • “Durability Requirements”
  • Wrangling Over II and 2
  • OPE Industry Successfully Adapting
  • Noise Pollution and Leaf Blowers
  • Municipal Restrictions and Bans
  • Restrictions Spread from California
  • The Politics of Noise Pollution
  • OPEI Begins to Tacke The Issues
  • OPEI’s PSA
  • Third-Party Certification
  • Local Yard Waste Restrictions

Market Size, Growth, and Composition
.

  • Equipment Sales at $12.7 Billion
  • Sales Stalling
  • Table 3-1: Estimated U.S. Retail Sales of Lawn and Gardening Equipment by Product Segment: 1996-2002 (in millions of $)
  • OPE Takes Biggest Hit
  • Watering/Spraying: Modest Growth
  • Tools/Implements Sluggish
  • OPE Dominates Equipment Shares
  • OPE Unit Shares: Gas-Powered Products
  • Table 3-2: Share of Gas-Powered Outdoor Power Equipment Shipments: By Product Type, 2002
  • Figure 3-1: Share of Gas-Powered Outdoor Power Equipment Shipments: By Product Type, 2002
  • Decadal Shifts in OPE Shares
  • Large OPE: Unit Shares
  • Portable OPE: Unit Shares
  • Unit Trends: Walk-Behind Lawn Mowers
  • Unit Trends: Front-Engine Lawn Tractors
  • Unit Trends: Garden Tractors
  • Unit Trends: Rear-Enging (RE) Riding Mowers
  • Unit Trends: Rotary Tillers
  • Unit Trends: Trimmer/Brushcutters
  • Unit Trends: Handheld Leaf Blowers
  • Unit Trends: Chainsaws
  • Unit Trends: Hegde Trimmers
  • Unit Trends: Backpack Leaf Blowers
  • “Guesstimated” Electric Shares
  • Tools/ImplementsL Ownership Shares
  • Watering/Spraying Equipment: Empirical, Anecdotal Evidence

Factors in Future Growth

  • Facing External, Internal Challenges
  • Reviewing 2001: Not a Good Year for Equipment
  • After the Crash, a Rebound
  • How Will a Sustained Slowdown Affect Sales?
  • The Optimists
  • Reinforcing the Stay-at-Home Trend
  • The Strong Housing Market
  • More DIY Positive
  • The Pessimists
  • Three Areas of Danger
  • The Weather Hasn’t Been Good
  • Proactivity and Climate Change
  • Forces Weakening the OPE Manufacturing/Distribution System
  • The Alleged Trouble with Investment Firms
  • Demographics Are Strongly Positive
  • The Appeal of Evolving Technology
  • Factors in Tools/Implement Growth
  • Factors in Watering Equipment Growth

Projected Category Sales

  • Over $14 Billion by 2007
  • Projections by Segment
  • Table 3-3: Projected Retail Sales of Lawn and Garden Equipment by Product Segment: 2003-2007 (millions of dollars)

The Marketers

  • Size and Type of Marketers
  • Most Marketers Are Manufacturers
  • Many Marketers Have Deep Historical Roots
  • Domestic vs. Foreign Marketers
  • Most OPE Makers with Diversified Interests
  • More Crossover Marketing
  • Leading Marketers: OPE
  • The Top Three: Toro, Electrolux, and MTD
    • Toro Co.
    • Electrolux AB
    • MTD Products

  • Leading Large OPE Specialists: Deere, Murray, Snapper, Honda
  • Simplicity and the Second Tier
  • Two Significant Minors: Country Home Products, GrassMasters
  • Anomalous Situations: Sears and Black & Decker
    • Sears Is a Retailer
    • Black & Decker Electric Power

  • Leading Portable OPE Specialists
  • Chainsaw Specialists
  • Tiller Marketers
  • Chipper/Shreder Marketers
  • Some Eclectic Significant Minors
  • OPE Engine Manufacturers
  • Leading Marketers: Tools/Implements
  • The Top Two in Tools: Ames True Temper and Fiskars
  • In the Second Tier: Union Tools, Corona Clipper
  • Significant Minors in Tools
  • Reel Mower Marketers
  • Wheeled Implement Marketers
  • Composter Marketers
  • Leading Marketers: Watering/Spraying Equipment
    • Marketers: Garden Hoses
    • Marketers: Sprinklers/Accessories
    • Marketers: Irrigation Systems
    • Marketers: Spraying Equipment

  • Table 3-4: Selected List of Lawn and Garden Equipment Marketers and Their Brands, 2003

The Competitive Situation

  • The Age of Consolidation/Shakeout
  • Not a Pretty Post-Millenial Picture
  • First Stirrings of Consolidation/Shakeout
  • 2001: The Crunch Sets In
  • Widespread Struggling
  • Post-2002: A Sense of Vulnerability
  • In Watering/Spraying, a Contrasting Stability
  • Outlook: More Suffering in Store?
  • Coping with Consolidation: Restructuring
  • MTD Revels in Consolidation
  • Professional Marketers: Small but Solid
  • Pro Mower Maker Crossover to Consumer Sector
  • Consumer OPE Marketers Try the Reverse
  • Tool Maketers Target Landscapers, Serious Gardeners
  • Stihl Breaks a Taboo
  • Subsegmenting and Niche Strategies
  • Country Home Products: A Unique Niche Specialist
  • The “New, Improved” Strategy
  • Forging Exclusive Retailer Alliances
  • Yet This Approach Has Its Perils

Competitive Profiles - OPE

  • The Toro Company
    • Sales Staff, But Profits Up
    • Three Divisions
    • The Professional Division
    • A Strategic Reorientation in the 1990s
    • But Professional Division Struggling
    • Toro’s Residential Division: An Unexpected Bright Spot
    • Toro, Lawn-Boy, and Wheel Horse
    • Branded Mower Extensions
    • Toro’s Portable OPE Line
    • Restructuring in 2001
    • Recent Product Recalls
    • Toro Stays Atop the Trends

  • MTD Products
    • A Full Line of Large and Portable Products
    • Five Large OPE Brand Lines
    • Acquires Ryobi, Then Troy-Bilt
    • Recent Focus on Cub Cadet and Yard-Man
    • Cub Cadet Now Sold at Lowe’s
    • An Educational Initiative
    • Recent Recalls
    • Focus: Ryobi

  • Electrolux AB
    • Sales and Markets
    • Electrolux Home Products
    • Three OPE Subsidiaries
    • Strategic Acquisitions: 1978-1990
    • Poulan/Weed Eater
    • Husqvarna
    • Husky’s Into Lowe’s, Sears
    • Recent Innovations
    • American Yard Products

  • Deere & Co.
    • Stagnant Sales, Declining Profits
    • Deere’s Divisions
    • Restructuring, Production Cutbacks
    • Deere Sells Off Homelite
    • Homelite’s Innovative Products
    • Bleeding Money
    • Homelite Sold to TechTronics
    • Deere Openly Moves Into Mass Channels
    • New Products

  • Black & Decker
    • Sales Stalling
    • Business Segments and Brands
    • An Innovator in Electric OPE
    • Focus on the “Hog” Line
    • Recent Recall

  • Murray, Inc.
    • 1988-1998: Flourished Under Tomkins
    • Acquired by Summersong - Restructuring
    • Murray Picks up a Few Items from Garden Way
    • Recent Recall

  • Snapper, Inc.
    • Snapper Strikes a Deal with Wal-Mart
    • Metromedia Sells
    • Simplicity Buys
    • Simplicity/Snapper Solidifies Industry

  • Garden Way
    • Radically Shifts Course - Troy-Bilt Suddenly into Stores
    • Building Sales and Resentment
    • The Final Miscalculation
    • An Ugly Ending
    • Garden Way’s Garage Sale

  • Brief Competitive Profiles: OPE Marketers
    • Simplicity Mfg. Co.
    • Echo, Inc.
    • Blount International
    • Mackissic
    • U.S. Home and Garden

Competitive Profiles - Tools

  • Ames True Temper
    • How Ames Achieved Success
    • Ames under U.S. Industries: Acquisitions
    • USI Sells ATT
    • New Owner: Wind Point Partners
    • Ames and True Temper Are Survivors

  • Fiskars Corp.
    • Fiskars Brands
    • Five Groups
    • 1990s: Fiskars Goes on an Acquisition Binge
    • Transformed into Outdoor Lifestyle Marketer
    • Fiskars’ Garden Tools, Soaker Hoses
    • On Cutting-Edge of Cutting Tools
    • Most Recent Introductions

  • Union Tools
    • Numerous Brand Lines
    • UT Is Consumer-Savvy
    • Lady Gardener
    • Despite Strengths, UT under Duress

  • Brief Competitive Overviews: Tool Marketers
    • Corona Clipper
    • McGuire/Flexake
    • Formosa Tools/Garden Pals

    Competitive Profiles: Watering/Spraying Marketers

    • Tekni-Plex (Colorite Plastics and Swan Hose)
      • The Consumer Packaging and Products Division
      • TP Acquires Colorite in 1998
      • Then Buys Swan Hose in 2001
      • Focus: Colorite
      • Focus: Swan House

    • Brief Competitive Overviews: Watering/Spraying Marketers
      • Teknor Apex Co.
      • L.R. Nelson
      • Rain Bird Sprinkler Mfg.
      • Gilmour
      • Melnor, Inc.
      • Root-Lowell Mfg. Co.

      New Products Trends

      • Rollout Velocity Slows
      • Variations on Existing Themes
      • Locus on Innovation: Engine Technology
        • Examples of New Engines

      • Leaner, Meaner, Cleaner Equals Hotter
      • Liquid-Cooled Alternatives
      • Elecric Product Intros Lag
      • The Future Could Be Brighter for Electric OPE
      • Hybrid Engines Suddenly Appear
      • On the Horizon: Solar, Hydrogen Power
      • A Flurry of Consumer Friendly Riding Mowers/Tractors
      • Professional Crossover Mowers
      • Easy-Start Mechanisms
      • Coming Soon: Computerization
      • Robotic Lawn Mowers
      • The Ultimate in Robot Mowers
      • Future Tense: Lasers Replace Blades?
      • The HoverMower
      • Few New Tools
      • Fiskars Keeps Feeding the Stream
      • Professional-Type Tools
      • Dynamic Activity in Composters
      • A Drought in New Watering Products
      • Attention Shifting to Water-Conservation Products
      • Drip-Type Systems Set to Soar
      • Using Sensors and Computers in Watering Systems
      • Table 3-5: Selected New Product Introductions: L&G Equipment, 2002-2002

      Distribution and Retail

      • Distribution Patterns
      • Retail Share: Home Centers Rise, Discounters Down
      • Home Centers Benefit from Marketer Alliances, Kmart Troubles
      • Wal-Mart Still Formidable
      • But Home Centers Favored by Marketers and Consumers
      • Home Depot’s Stand-Alone Store Strategy
      • Lowe’s Service Dealer Strategy
      • Lowe’s Perceived as More Upscale
      • OPE Dealers under the Gun
      • Dealer Profit Margins Not Good
      • Some Dealer Statistics
      • Dealer Coping Strategies
      • Sears
      • Hardware Stores
      • A Fresh Concept: Tractor Supply Co.
      • OPE Dealer Chains?
      • Smith & Hawken

      The Consumer

      • Explanatory Note on Simmons Market Research
      • Number of OPE Owners/Purchasers: By Product Type
      • Table 3-6: Outdoor Power Equipment: Number of Owners and Recent Purchasers by Product Type, 2002 (millions of households)
      • Factors Favoring Ownership: Walk-Behind Mowers
      • Riding Mowers and Garden Tractors
      • Garden Tillers
      • Fertilizer Spreaders
      • Snowthrowers
      • Leaf Blowers/Vacs
      • Edge/String Trimmers
      • Hedge Trimmers
      • Yard Trimmers
      • Number of Tools/Implements Owners: By Product Type
      • Table 3-7: Tools/Implements: Number of Owners and Recent Purchasers by Product Type, 2002 (millions of households)
      • Factors Favoring Ownership: Tools/Implements
      • Table 3-8a: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Ownership of Power Equipment By Product Type, 2002
      • Table 3-8b: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Ownership of Power Equipment By Product Type, 2002
      • Table 3-9a: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Ownership of Tools/Implements By Product Type, 2002
      • Table 3-9b: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Ownership of Tools/Implements By Product Type, 2002

Chapter 4: Lawn and Garden Supplies

  • Fertilizers/Growth Media: Four Product Types
  • Fertilizers: Supplements, Not Foods
  • Fertilizer Forms/Terminology
  • Growth Media
  • Pest Control Supplies: Three Product Types
  • Weed-and-Feed Products

    Government Regulation
    • Pesticides: Federal Regulation
    • Pesticide Regulation
    • The Food Quality Protection Act
    • EPA Takes Aime at Organophosphates
    • Banning Dursban; Phasing Out Diazinon
    • Two States Move to Ban Clopyralid
    • Are Triazines Next on Hit List
    • Fertilizer Restrictions on the Local Level
    • RISE Is Formed to Defend the Industry
    • Pesticide and Fertilizer Labeling

    Market Size, Growth, and Composition

    • Sales at $5.2 Billion
    • Table 4-1: Estimated U.S. Retail Sales of Lawn and Garden Supplies by Product Segment: 1998-2002
    • Why the Growth Rate Is Slowing
    • Segment Share: F/GM Leads
    • Figure 4-1: Share of Lawn/Garden Supplies Sales, 2002
    • Pesticides Appear to Grow More Slowly
    • Popularity of Supplies: By Product Type
    • Various Statistics on Supplies by Product Type
    • Retail Share
    • Figure 4-2: Share of Lawn Supplies Sales, By Retail Type, 2002
    • Regionality

    Factors in Future Growth

    • Some Strong Positives
    • The Economy Could Be a Problem
    • The Weather is a Wild Card
    • Supplies and Perceptions
    • Branding Creates Positive Perceptions
    • Consolidation Could Help
    • New Products Will Definitely Help
    • Environmental Awareness Poses a Challenge
    • Some Discontent with the Synthetic Status Quo
    • The Logic of Synthetics
    • An Industry Reorientation Could Fit Well with Cultural Trends
    • Industry Resistance and Natural Resistance

    Projected Category Growth

    • Subdued but Positive Growth
    • Projections by Product Segment
    • Table 4-2: Projected Retail Sales of Lawn and Garden Supplies by Product Segment: 2003-2007

    The Marketers

    • Size and Type Of Marketers
    • Concentration at the Top
    • Scotts Dominates
    • United Industries/Spectrum Brands Suddenly in Second Place
    • The Dissolution of Bayer-Pursell
    • Note on Second-Tier and Significant-Minor Marketers
    • Marketers: Lawn Fertilizers
    • Marketers: Plant Foods
    • Marketers: Potting Soil
    • Marketers: Peat Moss
    • Marketers: Lawn Lime
    • Marketers: Landscape Fabric
    • Marketers: Insecticides
    • Marketers: Herbicides
    • Marketers: Weed Preventers
    • Agrochemical Giants in Pesticides
    • Major Agrochems and Their Brands
    • Table 4-3: Selected List of U.S. Lawn and Garden Supplies Marketers, 2003

    The Competitive Situation

    • It’s Simple: Scotts Rules
    • But There’s Always a Challenger
    • Bayer-Pursell Dissolves
    • A New Rival Arises: United/Spectrum
    • Scotts vs. United: The Gap Is Narrowing
    • How Scotts Maintains Its Dominance
    • Pursuing Successful Niche Strategies
    • Competing by Acquiring
    • Competition: Fertilizer/Growth Media
    • Pesticides Competition and the Agrochemical Giants
    • Bayer Acquires Aventis
    • Competitive Profile: Scotts Co.
      • A Major L&G Crossover Marketer
      • Acquisition Patterns
      • Sales Stagnant Since 1999
      • Six Marketing Groups
      • Sales Trends by Group
      • Scotts’ Brands
      • Branding in U.K. and North/Central Europe
      • Ortho and Roundup
      • Miracle-Gro: Strategic Magic
      • True Synergy
      • Method to Madness
      • Taking the Bull by the Horns
      • Under the Miracle-Gro Umbrella
      • Recent MG Spin-Offs
      • Extending the Scotts and Ortho Lines
      • Into Biotech
      • A Sort-Of Image Update
      • Scotts Is Optimistic
      • Virgin Supermarkets
      • Medium-Term Plans

    • Competitive Profile: United Industries Corp.
      • UI Acquires Pursell’s Brands
      • Next Acquisition: Schultz Co.
      • Gaining Valuable Retail Connections
      • UI/SB’s Current Sales and Stakes
      • Laudable Ambitions
      • Greenhorn in Natural Niches
      • UI and Bayer
      • Pursell: A Leader in Fertilizer R&D and Manufacturing
      • Pursell’s Brands
      • Pursell Technologies

    • Brief Competitive Profiles
      • A.H. Hoffman
      • Green Light Co.
      • Bonide Products
      • Woodstream Corp.
      • Premier Horticulture
      • Central Garden & Pet
      • U.S. Home & Garden

      New Product Trends

      • Time-Release Fertilizer
      • Moisture-Control Agents
      • Specifically Targeted Products
      • Spikes and Stakes
      • Organic/Natural Products
      • Neem Oil Products
      • New Natural Brand Lines
      • Bio-Organic and Hydroponic Products
      • Winterizing Products
      • Liquids into Concentrates
      • Organophosphate Alternatives
      • Value-Added Peat Moss
      • New-Wave Soil Amendments
      • Trends in Mulch
      • Better Pesticide Applicators
      • Resealable Packaging
      • Foreign-Language Labeling
      • Table 4-4: Selected New Product Introductions: Lawn and Garden Supplies, 2001-2002

      Distribution and Retail

      • Direct Distribution Up
      • A Wide Range of Retail Outlets
      • Mass v.s Specialty Retail Store
      • Home Centers vs. Discounters
      • Kmart’s Troubles
      • Discounters and Private Label
      • Garden Centers/Nurseries Struggle
      • Frank’s Nursery and Crafts
      • Other GN/C Chains
      • Garden Center/Home Décor Combo Stores Not Successful
      • Profile: Molbak’s
      • Profile: Phanton-Gardener - Focus on Natural/Organic Niche
      • GC/Ns Joining Co-o Buying Groups
      • Numerous Co-Op Benefits
      • Examples of Buying Groups

      The Consumer

      • Lawn Fertilizer Most Popular Product
      • Purchasing Patterns by Sex
      • Factors Favoring Purchase: All Supplies
      • Purchaser Profiles: Lawn Fertilizer, Garden Fertilizer
      • Purchaser Profile: Plant Food
      • Purchaser Profile: Compost
      • Purchaser Profile: Synthetic (Lawn/Garden) Insecticide
      • Purchaser Profile: Synthetic (Lawn) Herbicide
      • Purchaser Profile: Organic Insecticide
      • Tables 4-5a and b: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Ownership of Lawn and Garden Supplies: By Product Type, 2002

Chapter 5: Professional Lawncare Services

  • The Services: Definition/Parameters
  • Lawncare Operators: Selling Points
  • The Standard Treatment Program
  • Customized Programs
    • Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
    • Organic Treatment Programs

  • Enhanced Services
  • Fungicide Treatments
  • Prices for Programs

    Market Size, Growth and Composition
    • Services at $3.9 Billion in 2002
    • Table 5-1: Estimated Sales of Professional Lawncare Services: 1998-2002
    • Reasons for Slight Growth Slowdown
    • Standard Programs Predominate
    • Residential Business Accounts for Lion’s Share
    • Seasonality
    • Regionality

    Factors in Future Growth

    • Homeowners and Boomers Strongly Positive
    • DIY Reluctance Regarding Chem Treatment
    • Slowing Economy an Obstale to Services Growth
    • The Weather Could Be Negative
    • Despite Obstacles, Strong Demand for Services Will Continue
    • Price Rises Appear Invisible
    • Regulations: Negatives and Positives
    • Industry Defensive on Regulations
    • Proactive Approach Needed, But Fragmentation Stands in the Way
    • The Labor Picture
    • Learning Spanish
    • Consolidation: Pros and Cons
    • Retailer Alliances

    Projected Category Sales

    • Demand Should Remain Strong
    • Over $5 Billion by 2007
    • Table 5-2: Projected Sales of Professional Lawncare Services: 2003-2007
    • The Marketers
    • Most Firms Are Small Independents
    • Then There’s TruGreen-Chemlawn
    • Regional Franchise Operations

    The Competitive Situation

    • Consolidation Name of the Game
    • Pressure on Independents
    • Indys Play up Strengths
    • Adding Services
    • The Franchising Option
    • Competitive Profile: ServiceMaster (TruGreen-ChemLawn)
      • Consumer/Commercial and Other Divisions
      • A Unique Strategy
      • SM’s Buyout Strategy Applied to Lawncare Services
      • TruGreen-ChemLawn in the Doldrums
      • Turning Things Around
      • LandCare Acquisition Hard to Swallow
      • A New Mowing Service
      • Retail Alliance Tested with Home Depot
      • Test Ends, But Positive Impressions Linger
      • Has TGCL Gotten Too Big?

    • Competitive Profile: Scotts Lawnservice
      • Scotts’ Road to Success
      • External and Internal Growth Strategies
      • Being Careful about Acquisitions
      • Target Cities
      • Committed to “Do-It-For-Me” Market

    • Competitive Profile: Lawn Doctor
      • Franchise Fees
      • Standard Program
      • Customized Treatment Services

    • Competitive Profile: Weed Man
      • Weed Man’s Plan of Attack
      • No. 2 by 2010?
      • A Comprehensive System

      The Consumer

      • Estimated Number of Service Users
      • Note: Profile Inferred
      • Service Users Display Strong Upscale Profile
      • Some Homeowner Statistics
      • Listening to Sinatra and Streisand

Chapter 6: Trends and Opportunities

  • Overview: Positives with Negatives
  • Transforming Negatives into Positives
  • Demographics: Automatically Positive Opportunities
  • Another Automatic Opportunity: Stay-at-Homeowners
  • The Silver Lining in Economic Clouds
  • Opportunities in Acknowledging Climate Change
  • Regulation: Consumer Education a Must
  • Great Opportunities in Natural/Organic
  • Placing High-Tech in a Larger Context
  • Consolidation Offers Marketing Opportunities

Appendix I: Glossary

Appendix II: Addresses of Selected Marketers