The Kids Market in the U.S.

May 1, 2006
228 Pages - Pub ID: LA1119536
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Forces such as recurring parental and governmental concerns about child obesity, safety on the Internet, and the appropriateness of marketing and promotions directly targeting children continue to have an impact on the kids market in the U.S. In addition to addressing these external challenges, companies active in the kids market also need to adapt to the rapidly evolving consumer attitudes and habits of media-saturated kids and their families.

The Kids Market in the U.S., the 7th edition of this popular Packaged Facts report, addresses the needs of firms marketing products and services designed for the 36 million kids in the 3- to 11-year-old age group. The report drills deep into data from the Fall 2005 Simmons Kids National Consumer Survey to create detailed profiles of key consumer segments in the kids market.

The report begins with an assessment of demographic trends affecting the kids market, such as population growth rates in key age and multicultural segments, and provides insights into the attitudes and feelings of kids about their families and friends. The report proceeds to focus on areas of vital concern to marketers active in the kids market. One chapter of the report analyzes sources of kids’ income and their attitudes toward spending and saving. Another chapter explores the extent to which kids control their own destinies as consumers in areas such as entertainment, apparel, food, and toys. The report goes on to provide critically important insights into key aspects of the kids market, including profiles of trendsetting, fashion-forward kids; an assessment of parents’ and kids’ perceptions of advertising effectiveness; an in-depth look at when “kids” become “tweens”; and marketing issues and media trends affecting the preschooler segment of the kids market. A detailed evaluation of the media usage habits and a comprehensive analysis of the leisure-time activities of kids are provided. The report concludes with chapters on the size and growth of the buying power of kids and an assessment of marketing and advertising trends and strategic trends and opportunities.

Report Methodology
The information in The Kids Market in the U.S. is based on both primary and secondary research. Primary research involved interviews with experts, public relations and industry analysts in firms that specialize in youth and urban market research. The report features unique analysis based on the Simmons Market Research Bureau Fall 2005 National Consumer Survey and Fall 2005 Kids National Consumer Survey. Secondary research entailed data-gathering from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature.

About the Authors
Dr. Robert Brown and Ms. Ruth Washton have written more than 25 Packaged Facts reports analyzing demographic trends and marketing strategies in key consumer segments. Topics have ranged from kids to mature consumers to multicultural groups such as Hispanics and African Americans. Dr. Brown and Ms. Washton have co-authored several Financial Times Business Reports on strategic business issues and have provided market and competitor intelligence studies for clients in a variety of industries. Dr. Brown has a B.S. from Georgetown University and a Ph.D. degree from The George Washington University. Ms. Washton has a B.A from Skidmore College and an M.A. from the State University of New York.

How You Will Benefit from this Report
If your company is interested in understanding and reaching the kids market, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight about 3-11-year-old consumers not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current demographic profile of the child population. Contributing to that understanding will be a complete analysis of data from published and trade sources, and in-depth examinations of the economic and societal trends that influence the consumer behaviors of this large and influential segment of the population. Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

This report will help:

  • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for children’s products.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for products targeting the 3-11-year-old population.
  • Advertising agencies to develop messages and images that compel kids (or their parents) to purchase these products.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.

Chapter 1 Executive Summary
  • Introduction
    • Background
    • Overview of Report

  • Scope and Methodology
    • Scope of Report
    • Methodology

  • Demographic Profile
    • Kids Population Totals 36 Million
    • Kids Population to Experience Below-Average Growth
    • Population of Multicultural Kids Will Grow in Importance

  • Life at Home and at School
    • America’s Kids Live in Wide Variety of Family Environments
    • Family Environment of Kids Varies by Race, Education, and Income
    • Kids Still Value Family
    • Kids Attend School at Younger Ages
    • Older Kids Lose Interest in School
    • Majority Want to Go to College
    • Tween Boys Most Likely to See Value of Friends, but Girls More Likely to Stay in Touch Online

  • Kids and Money: Spenders vs. Savers
    • Majority of Kids Do Chores to Earn Money
    • More Boys Want to Be Rich
    • Girls Save More
    • Higher-Income Kids More Likely to Be Savers

  • When Kids Rule: Consumer Autonomy among Kids
    • Kids’ Freedom Varies by Product and Service
    • Tween Girls Enjoy Most Autonomy as Consumers
    • High-Income Parents Exercise More Control over Kids’ Fashion Choices and Less Influence over Entertainment Decisions
    • Girls Get Dolls They Want Regardless of Family Income
    • African American Kids Most Likely to Get to Visit Favorite Fast-Food
    • Restaurant
    • College Educated Parents Less Likely to Indulge Kids
    • Affluent Kids Have More Impact on Parents’ Brand Choices

  • Key Consumer Insights
    • Trendsetting Kids Mirror Profile of Older Counterparts
    • Kids in More Affluent Households Less Susceptible to Ads
    • Parental Attitudes toward Advertising to Kids Vary Widely
    • Parents of Preschoolers More Negative toward Advertising
    • Even Preschoolers Have Impact on Parents’ Choice of Brands
    • Preschoolers Now Part of Internet Generation
    • Some Preschoolers Shop Online
    • Interest in Fashion Begins to Kick in at Ages 8 and 9
    • Consumer Autonomy Jumps at Age 9
    • Kids’ Rooms Start to Become Home Entertainment and Social Centers at
    • Age 9
    • Many Preadolescent Kids Remain Kids rather than Becoming Tweens

  • Media Usage
    • Affluent Kids less Involved with Traditional Media
    • Nickelodeon Magazine Ranks Highest with Kids
    • Younger Kids Entranced by Television
    • Many Kids Unhappy with Program Choices
    • Nearly Half of Kids Watch TV for 1 to 3 Hours Every Day
    • Older Kids Tune in More Channels
    • Radio More Important to Older Kids
    • One out of Four Tweens Has Computer in Room
    • More Girls Use Computers
    • Younger Boys Like Computers More but Girls Catch Up When They Get
    • Older
    • Internet Attracts More Girls
    • Internet Has Universal Appeal for Kids
    • Online Activities Identified

  • Leisure and Entertainment Choices of Kids
    • Love of Movies Transcends Demographic Boundaries
    • Fast Food Remains Universally Popular among Kids
    • Older Kids Look for Good Food, Younger Kids for Good Toys and Prizes
    • Kids’ Rooms Loaded with Electronics
    • Affluent Kids less Likely to Have TV in Room
    • Kids More Likely to Buy than Rent DVDs
    • Music Becomes More Important as Kids Grow Up
    • CD Players Kids’ Leading Choice for Audio Equipment
    • Relatively Few Kids Own MP3 Players
    • Online Game Players More Affluent
    • As They Get Older, More Girls and Fewer Boys Read Books
    • Tween Girls Remain Interested in Traditional Toys
    • Dolls Continue to Interest Older Girls

  • Size and Growth of the Kids Market
    • Buying Power of Kids Tops $18 Billion
    • Families Spend More than $115 Billion for Kids in Key Consumer Areas
    • Kids Buying Power Will Total $21.4 Billion in 2010

  • Trends and Opportunities
    • Parental and Governmental Concerns about Child Obesity Continue to
    • Affect Kids Market
    • Food Marketers Incorporate Focus on Kids’ Health into Strategies
    • Kids TV Responds to Critics
    • Kids Marketing Strategies Change as Families Evolve
    • Media Giants Shift Focus to Youngest Kids
    • Traditional Media Losing Hold on Affluent Kids and Parents
    • Television Advertising Continues to Lose Ground in Kids Market
    • Multi-tasking Kids Get Harder and Harder to Reach
    • Comprehensive Marketing Approaches Needed More than Ever to Reach Kids
    • Opportunities in Key Kids Market Segments Highlighted
    • Cell Phone Marketers Tap into Kids Market to Continue Growth

Section 1 The Social World of Kids
Chapter 2 Demographic Profile

  • Size of the Kids Population
    • Kids Population Totals 36 Million
    • Table 2-1: Size of Kids Population by Single Year of Age, 2004
    • Table 2-2: Kids as Percent of Total U.S. Population, 2004 Boys Predominate in Kids Population
    • Table 2-3: Percent of Males and Females by Selected Age Groups, 2004

  • Population Growth Trends
    • Kids Population to Experience Below-Average Growth
    • Table 2-4: Selected Age Groups as Percent of Total Population, 2005 vs. 2010
    • Table 2-5: Projected Growth in the Kids Population by Age Group, 2005 vs. 2010
    • Multicultural Kids Now More than 40% of Kids Population
    • Table 2-6: Population of 3- to 11-Year-Olds by Race and Hispanic Origin,
    • Table 2-7: Non-Hispanic Whites and Multicultural Population Groups as Percent of U.S. Population by Age Group, 2004.
    • Table 2-8: Race and Hispanic Origin of 3- to 11-Year-Olds by Age Group,
    • Population of Multicultural Kids Will Grow in Importance
    • Table 2-9: Growth of the Population of Kids under the Age of 14, Hispanics vs. Other Population Groups, 2005 vs. 2010

Chapter 3 Life at Home and at School

  • Family Environment
    • America’s Kids Live in Wide Variety of Family Environments
    • Table 3-1: Key Characteristics of Family Environment of 3- to 11-Year-Olds 2004
    • Family Environment of Kids Varies by Race, Education, and Income
    • Table 3-2: Living Arrangements of 3- to 11-Year-Olds by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2004
    • Table 3-3: Percent of Children under 18 Living with Both Parents by
    • Education and Income of Householder, 2004
    • Kids Still Value Family
    • Figure 3-1: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who “Spend Free Time with
    • Family” by Age Group and Gender

  • School Environment
    • Kids Attend School at Younger Ages
    • Table 3-4: Grade of Enrollment of 3- to 11-Year-Olds by Single Year of Age, October 2004
    • Figure 3-2: Percent of 3- and 4-Year-Olds Attending Nursery School, 1965-2004
    • Older Kids Lose Interest in School
    • Figure 3-3: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who “Enjoy Going to School” by
    • Age Group and Gender
    • Majority Want to Go to College Table 3-5: Degree of Motivation at School, 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender
    • and Age Group
    • African American Kids More Likely to Have High Aspirations Table 3-6: Profile of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who Like School by Demographic Characteristic

  • Kids and Their Friends
    • Tween Boys Most Likely to See Value of Friends
    • Table 3-7: The Importance of Friends, 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
    • Girls More Likely to Stay in Touch Online
    • Table 3-8: Socializing on the Internet by 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group

Section 2 Highlights of Consumer Behavior
Chapter 4 Kids and Money: Spenders vs. Savers

  • Sources of Income
    • Around 30% of Kids Enjoy Above-Average Household Income
    • Table 4-1: Household Income of 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Age Group Majority of Kids Do Chores to Earn Money
    • Table 4-2: Income Sources of 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
    • Lower-Income Kids More Likely to Get Money as Needed
    • Table 4-3: Source of Money of 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Demographic Characteristic Allowances and Earnings Average Less than $10 Weekly
    • Table 4-4: Amount of Allowances/Chores Earnings of 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group

  • Attitudes toward Money
    • More Boys Want to Be Rich
    • Figure 4-1: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Old Boys and Girls Who
    • “Want to Be Rich”
    • Girls Save More
    • Table 4-5: Attitudes toward Money of 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
    • Higher-Income Kids More Likely to Be Savers
    • Table 4-6: Savers vs. Spenders: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who Like to Save and Who Spend without Thinking by Demographic
    • Characteristic

Chapter 5 When Kids Rule: Consumer Autonomy among Kids

  • When Kids Get to Buy What They Want
    • Introduction
    • Kids’ Freedom Varies by Product and Service
    • Table 5-1: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who Get to Choose Desired
    • Product or Activity Most or Some of the Time by Product or Activity
    • Tween Girls Enjoy Most Autonomy as Consumers
    • Table 5-2: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who Get to Choose Various
    • Products and Services Some or Most of the Time by Age and Gender
    • Consumer Independence Jumps Dramatically among Tweens
    • Table 5-3: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Buying Own Things by Age Group and Gender
    • High-Income Families Exercise More Control over Kids’ Fashion Choices
    • Table 5-4: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who Get to Choose Brand of Jeans and Sneakers/Athletic Shoes Most/Some of the Time by Demographic Characteristic
    • More Affluent Kids Have Greater Say over Entertainment Choices
    • Table 5-5: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who Get to Choose Entertainment Most/Some of the Time by Demographic Characteristic
    • Girls Get Dolls They Want Regardless of Family Income
    • Table 5-6: Consumer Autonomy of 6- to 11-Year-Olds: Percent Who Get to Choose Dolls and Wanted Toys Most/Some of the Time by Demographic Characteristic
    • African American Kids Most Likely to Get to Visit Favorite Fast-Food Restaurant
    • Table 5-7: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who Get to Choose Restaurants Most/Some of the Time by Demographic Characteristic College Educated Parents Less Likely to Indulge Kids
    • Table 5-8: Attitudes of Parents toward Indulging Children by Age of Children and Demographic Characteristic

  • When Parents and Kids Work Together to Decide What to Buy
    • Food and Clothing Most Likely to Be Joint Parent-Child Decisions
    • Table 5-9: Percent of Parents Making Purchasing Decisions Jointly with Children by Category of Decision and Demographic Characteristic
    • Tween Girls Have Greatest Impact on Family Decisions
    • Table 5-10: Frequency of Grocery Shopping by 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
    • Table 5-11: Impact of 6- to 11-Year-Olds on Family Vacations by Gender and Age Group
    • Parents Enjoy Shopping More as Kids Get Older
    • Table 5-12: Percent of Parents Who Enjoy Shopping with Their Children by Demographic Characteristic Affluent Kids Have More Impact on Parents’ Brand Choices
    • Table 5-13: Percent of Parents Who Say Their Children Have a Significant Impact on the Brands They Choose by Demographic Characteristic

    Chapter 6 Key Consumer Insights

    • Tracking the Trendsetters in the Kids Market
      • Many Younger Girls Focus on Fashion
      • Table 6-1: Attitudes toward Fashion, 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
      • Trendsetting Kids Mirror Profile of Older Counterparts
      • Table 6-2: Profile of Trendsetting Kids: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who
      • Like to Keep Up with the Latest Fashions and Are First to Try New Things, by Demographic Characteristic
      • Older Girls Become Less Confident
      • Figure 6-1: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who Are “Happy about the Way I Look” by Age Group and Gender
      • Girls’ Interest in “Cool” Wanes with Age
      • Table 6-3: Attitudes of 6- to 11-Year-Olds toward Wearing Cool Clothes by Gender and Age Group
      • Popularity of Jeans and Sneaker Brands Shift as Kids Get Older
      • Table 6-4: Brands of Jeans Owned by 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Age Group
      • Table 6-5: Brands of Sneakers/Athletic Shoes Owned by 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Age Group
      • Tween Girls More Attached to Licensed Sportswear
      • Figure 6-2: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Owning Licensed Sportswear by
      • Age Group and Gender

    • Kids, Parents, and Advertising
    • Ads Lose Effectiveness as Kids Get Older
    • Table 6-6: Attitudes toward Advertising of 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
    • Kids in More Affluent Households Less Susceptible to Ads
    • Table 6-7: Profile of 6- to 11-Year-Olds with Above-Average Ad Receptivity by Demographic Characteristic
    • Parental Attitudes toward Advertising to Kids Vary Widely
    • Table 6-8: Attitudes of Parents toward Advertising to Children by
    • Demographic Characteristic

  • Preschoolers: Marketing and Media Usage Trends
    • Parents of Preschoolers More Negative toward Advertising
    • Table 6-9: Attitudes of Parents toward Advertising to Children by Age and Gender of Children
    • Even Preschoolers Have Impact on Parents’ Choice of Brands
    • Figure 6-3: Percent of Parents Saying Their Kids Have a Significant Impact
    • on Brands by Age of Children
    • Parents Indulge Preschoolers More
    • Table 6-10: Attitudes of Parents toward Indulging Children by Age of
    • Children by Demographic Characteristic
    • Preschoolers Increasingly Engaged with Screen Media of All Kinds
    • Parents of Preschoolers Place More Trust in Computers than Television
    • Preschoolers Now Part of Internet Generation
    • Some Preschoolers Shop Online
    • Table 6-11: Activities Performed on Computer and the Internet by 3- to 5-Year-Olds

  • When Do “Kids” Become “Tweens”?
    • “Tweens” an Elusive Concept
    • Attitudes toward Family and School Start to Change at 8
    • Table 6-12: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Spending Free Time with Family
    • by Single Year of Age and Gender
    • Figure 6-4: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who Enjoy Going to School by Single Year of Age
    • Interest in Fashion Begins to Kick in at Ages 8 and 9
    • Table 6-13: 6- to 11-Year-Olds’ Attitudes toward Fashion by Single Year of Age
    • Consumer Autonomy Jumps at Age 9
    • Table 6-14: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Choosing Brand of Jeans and Sneakers Most or Some of the Time by Single Year of Age
    • Kids’ Rooms Start to Become Home Entertainment and Social Centers at Age 9
    • Table 6-15: 6- to 11-Year-Olds’ Ownership of Home Electronics in Room
    • Many Kids Remain Kids

    Section 3 Media and Entertainment Choices
    Chapter 7 Media Usage

    • Overview
      • Affluent Kids less Involved with Traditional Media
      • Table 7-1: Profile of 6- to 11-Year-Olds with Above-Average Media
      • Involvement by Demographic Characteristic

    • Use of Print Media by Kids
      • Older Kids Less Likely to Find Newspapers Boring
      • Table 7-2: Attitudes toward Print Media of 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
      • Many Kids Pay Attention to Ads and Comics in Sunday Papers
      • Table 7-3: Readership of Sunday Newspapers by 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
      • Nickelodeon Magazine Ranks Highest with Kids
      • Table 7-4: Magazines Popular with 6- to 8-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Table 7-5: Magazines Popular with 9- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender

    • Television and Radio
      • Younger Kids Entranced by Television
      • Figure 7-1: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Old Boys and Girls Who “Love
      • Watching Television” by Age Group
      • Table 7-6: Attitudes toward Television of 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
      • Many Kids Unhappy with Program Choices
      • Table 7-7: Attitudes toward Television Programming of 6- to 11-Year-Olds
      • by Gender and Age Group
      • Watching TV a Social Occasion for Most Kids
      • Figure 7-2: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Saying “It’s More Fun to Watch
      • TV with My Friends” by Age Group and Gender
      • Nearly Half of Kids Watch TV for 1 to 3 Hours Every Day
      • Table 7-8: Time Spent Watching Television, 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Age
      • Group and Gender
      • Older Kids Tune in More Channels
      • Table 7-9: Cable TV Services Watched by 6- to 8-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Table 7-10: Cable TV Services Watched by 9- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Significant Overlap in Most Popular Cable Outlets
      • Table 7-11: Most Popular Cable TV Services Watched by 6- to 11-Year-Old Boys and Girls by Age Group
      • ABC Leading Broadcast Network among Kids
      • Table 7-12: Broadcast Network Net Audience, 6- to 8-Year-Old Boys and Girls
      • Table 7-13: Broadcast Network Net Audience, 9- to 11-Year-Old Boys and Girls
      • Boys and Girls Watch Different Types of Shows
      • Table 7-14: TV Show Types Frequently Viewed by 6- to 8-Year-Old Boys and Girls
      • Table 7-15: TV Show Types Frequently Viewed by 9- to 11-Year-Old Boys and Girls
      • Radio More Important to Older Kids
      • Table 7-16: Time Spent Listening to the Radio, 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender Format Preferences Shift with Age
      • Table 7-17: Radio Formats Most Listened to by 6- to 8-Year-Old Boys and Girls
      • Table 7-18: Radio Formats Most Listened to by 9- to 11-Year-Old Boys and Girls

    • Kids and New Media
      • One out of Four Tweens Has Computer in Room
      • Figure 7-3: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds with Computer in Room by Gender and Age Group
      • More Girls Use Computers
      • Table 7-19: Use of Computers by 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
      • Younger Boys Like Computers More but Girls Catch Up When They Get Older
      • Table 7-20: Profile of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who Love Using the Computer by Demographic Characteristic Internet Attracts More Girls
      • Table 7-21: Use of the Internet by 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group Internet Has Universal Appeal for Kids
      • Table 7-22: Profile of 6- to 11-Year-Old Internet Users by Demographic Characteristic Online Activities Identified
      • Table 7-23: Online Activities of 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender Top Websites for Kids Identified
      • Table 7-24: Web Sites Visited in Last Week by 6- to 8-Year-Olds by Gender
      • Table 7-25: Web Sites Visited in Last 30 Days by 9- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender

    Chapter 8 Leisure and Entertainment Choices of Kids

    • Going to the Movies
      • Younger Kids More Likely to “Love Going to the Movies” but Older Kids Go More Often
      • Figure 8-1: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds’ Who “Love Going to the Movies” by Gender and Age Group
      • Table 8-1: Frequency of Movie Attendance in Last 3 Months by 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
      • Figure 8-2: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Usually Seeing a Movie Right after It Opens, by Gender and Age Group
      • Love of Movies Transcends Demographic Boundaries
      • Table 8-2: Profile of 6- to 11-Year-Old Moviegoers by Demographic Characteristic Several Factors Influence Kids’ Movie Choices
      • Table 8-3: Reasons Why 6- to 11-Year-Olds Saw Last Movie, by Gender

      and Age Group
    • Going Out to Eat
      • Fast Food Remains Universally Popular among Kids
      • Table 8-4: Visits to Fast-Food and Family Restaurants in Last 30 Days by
      • 6- to 11-Year- Olds by Gender and Age Group
      • Tween Girls Most Likely to Get to Go to Favorite Fast-Food Restaurant
      • Table 8-5: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Visiting Favorite Fast-Food
      • Restaurant by Gender and Age Group
      • Older Kids Look for Good Food, Younger Kids for Good Toys and Prizes
      • Table 8-6: Reasons Why 6- to 11-Year-Olds Pick Favorite Fast-Food Restaurant by Gender and Age Group

    • Entertainment at Home
      • Kids’ Rooms Loaded with Electronics
      • Figure 8-3: Percent of Kids with TV in Room by Age Group and Gender
      • Table 8-7: Ownership of Home Electronics by 6- to 11-Year-Olds by
      • Gender and Age Group
      • Affluent Kids less Likely to Have TV in Room
      • Table 8-8: Profile of 6- to 11-Year-Olds with TV, DVD Player, or VHS in Room
      • Most Kids Use VCRs
        • Table 8-9: Use of VCRs by 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
        • Kids More Likely to Buy than Rent DVDs
        • Table 8-10: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Renting or Buying Videotapes or DVDs in Last 12 Months by Age Group and Gender
        • DVD Choices Change as Kids Get Older
        • Table 8-11: Types of DVDs and Videotapes Bought or Rented by 6- to
        • 11-Year-Olds in Last12 Months by Age Group and Gender
        • Most Parents Let Kids Pick DVDs and Videos
        • Table 8-12: Types of DVDs and Videotapes Bought or Rented by 6- to
        • 11-Year-Olds in Last 12 Months by Age Group and Gender

      • Listening to Music
        • Music Becomes More Important as Kids Grow Up
        • Table 8-13: Attitudes toward Music of 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
        • CD Players Kids’ Leading Choice for Audio Equipment
        • Table 8-14: Ownership of Audio Products by 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
        • Relatively Few Kids Own MP3 Players
        • Table 8-15: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds with MP3 Player, Walkabout Stereo with Headphones, and CD Player by Demographic Characteristic

      • Playing Video Games
        • Girls Turn to Video Games as They Get Older
        • Figure 8-4: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Using Handheld Video Games by Age Group and Gender
        • Figure 8-5: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Using Video Games Attached to TV by Age Group and Gender
        • Boys Predominate among Heavy Game Users
        • Table 8-16: Percent of 6- to 11-year-Olds Playing Video Games in Last
        • Week, by Gender and Age Group
        • Online Game Players More Affluent
        • Table 8-17: Profile of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who Play Video Games
        • Frequently by Demographic Characteristic
        • Action/Adventure Games Top Choice for Kids
        • Table 8-18: Types of Video Games (Attached to TV) Played by 6- to
        • 11-Year-Olds by Age Group and Gender

      • Reading Books
        • As They Get Older, More Girls and Fewer Boys Read Books
        • Figure 8-6: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who Read Books Other than
        • School Books by Age Group and Gender
        • Young Book Lovers Profiled
        • Table 8-19: Profile of 6- to 11-Year-Old Readers of Books by Demographic Characteristic
        • Popular Book Genres Identified
        • Table 8-20: Types of Books Read by 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender and Age Group
        • Tween Boys Most Likely to Read Comic Books
        • Figure 8-7: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who Read/Look At Comic Books by Age Group and Gender

      • Toys and Games
        • Shifts in Toy Choices Clear as Boys Get Older
        • Table 8-21: Most Popular Toys and Games Owned by 6- to 11-Year-Old
        • Boys by Age Group
        • Figure 8-8: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Old Boys Owning Electronic Games by Age Group
        • Tween Girls Remain Interested in Traditional Toys
        • Table 8-22: Most Popular Toys and Games Owned by 6- to 11-Year-Old
        • Girls by Age Group
        • Dolls Continue to Interest Older Girls
        • Table 8-23: Dolls Owned by 6- to 11-Year-Old Girls by Age Group

      • Sports and Other Leisure Activities
        • Tween Girls More Interested in Sports
        • Figure 8-9: Percent of 6- to 11-Year-Olds Who “Love Playing Sports” by Gender and Age Group
        • Kids’ Favorite Sports Identified
        • Table 8-24: Sports Popular with to 6- to 8-Year-Old Boys and Girls
        • Table 8-25: Sports Popular with to 9- to 11-Year-Old Boys and Girls
        • Painting and Drawing Most Popular Leisure-Time Activities
        • Table 8-26: Hobbies and Leisure-time Activities Popular with 6- to 8-Year-Old Boys and Girls
        • Table 8-27: Hobbies and Leisure-time Activities Popular with 9- to 11-Year-Old Boys and Girls
        • Photography Important Activity for Girls
        • Table 8-28: Ownership of Cameras by 6- to 11-Year-Olds by Gender an0
        • Age Group

    Section 4 Market Trends
    Chapter 9 Size and Growth of the Kids Market

    • Buying Power of Kids
      • Kids’ Income Takes Several Forms
      • Buying Power of Kids Tops $18 Billion Table 9-1: Buying Power of 3- to 11-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2005

      Family Expenditures on Kids
      • Family Expenditures on Kids Categorized
      • Families Spend More than $115 Billion for Kids in Key Consumer Areas
      • Table 9-2: Annual Family Expenditures on Food, Clothing, Personal-Care Items, Entertainment, and Reading Materials for 3- to 11-Year-Olds, by Percent of Total for Each Age Group, 2004
      • Older Kids Account for Relatively Bigger Share of Family Expenditures
      • Table 9-3: Aggregate Annual Family Expenditures on Food, Clothing,
      • Personal-Care Items, Entertainment, and Reading Materials for 3- to 11-Year-Olds, by Age Group, 2004
      • Table 9-4: Aggregate Annual Family Expenditures on Food for 3- to 11-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2004
      • Table 9-5: Aggregate Annual Family Expenditures on Clothing for 3- to 11-Year-Olds by Age Group, 2004
      • Table 9-6: Aggregate Annual Family Expenditures on Personal-Care Items, Entertainment, and Reading Materials for 3- to 11-Year-Olds by Single Year of Age, 2004

    • Projected Growth of the Kids Market
      • Family Expenditures on Kids Will Increase by 20%
      • Table 9-7: Projected Growth in Family Expenditures on 3- to 11-Year-Olds for Selected Consumer Products, 2005-2010
      • Table 9-8: Projected Growth in Family Expenditures on 3- to 5-Year-Olds for Selected Consumer Products, 2005-2010
      • Table 9-9: Projected Growth in Family Expenditures on 6- to 8-Year-Olds for Selected Consumer Products, 2005-2010
      • Table 9-10: Projected Growth in Family Expenditures on 9- to 11-Year-Olds for Selected Consumer Products, 2005-2010
      • Kids Buying Power Will Total $21.4 Billion in 2010
      • Table 9-11: Projected Growth in Buying Power of 3- to 11-Year-Olds, 2005-2010
      • Table 9-12: Projected Growth in Buying Power of 3- to 5-Year-Olds, 2005-2010
      • Table 9-13: Projected Growth in Buying Power of 6- to 8-Year-Olds, 2005-2010
      • Table 9-14: Projected Growth in Buying Power of 9- to 11-Year-Olds, 2005-2010

    Chapter 10 Trends and Opportunities

    • Market Trends
      • Parental and Governmental Concerns about Child Obesity Continue to Affect Kids Market
      • Food Marketers Incorporate Focus on Kids’ Health into Strategies
      • Kids TV Responds to Critics
      • Kids Marketing Strategies Change as Families Evolve
      • Marketers Seeing Growing Impact of Kids in Family Decisions
      • Grandparents Assume More Importance in Kids Market
      • Online Shopping Draws More Kids
      • Table 10-1: Percent of 3- to 14-Year-Olds Using the Internet Who Get
      • Product Information or Purchase Products Online by Age Group
      • Preschoolers Get More Attention from Marketers
      • Media Giants Also Shift Focus to Youngest Kids
      • Traditional Media Losing Hold on Affluent Kids and Parents
      • More Kids Expect to Get the TV Program They Want When They Want It
      • Television Advertising Continues to Lose Ground in Kids Market
      • Multi-tasking Kids Get Harder and Harder to Reach
      • Comprehensive Marketing Approaches Needed More than Ever to Reach
      • Kids
      • Kids Lead Way into New Multimedia, Cross-Platform World

    • Marketing Opportunities
      • Opportunities in Key Kids Market Segments Highlighted
      • Table 10-2: Overview of Selected Kids Market Segments
      • Cell Phone Marketers Tap into Kids Market to Continue Growth
      • Problem of Child Obesity Creates an Opportunity for Some Marketers

    Appendix Addresses of Selected Kids Market Resources

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