The U.S. Infant, Toddler, and Preschool Market

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Published Feb 1, 2000 | 470 Pages | Pub ID: LA530

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This all-new report analyzes the $20-billion infant, toddler and preschool market. It provides comprehensive coverage of four product categories: clothing (apparel and footwear), baby care supplies (diapers, skincare and toiletries, and baby feeding accessories), juvenile furniture and nursery accessories, and toys. Included are data on market size and growth (retail sales estimates for the 1995-1999 period and forecasts through 2005) and con-sumer demographics. Assessment of the competitive situation includes profiles of major marketers and retailers.
    Volume One
  1. Executive Summary
      Scope and Methodology
      • Scope of Market
      • Report Methodology
      The Overall Market
      • Scope of Report
      • Clothing
      • Baby Care Supplies
      • Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories
      • Toys
      • Products Not Included
      • Product Safety
      • Market Size and Growth
      • Table 1-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Infant/Toddler/Preschool Market by Category, 1995-2004 (dollars): Clothing, Baby Care Supplies, Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories, Toys
      • Mass Merchandisers the Largest Retail Channel
      • Figure 1-1: Share of U.S. ITP Dollar Sales by Retail Outlet, 1999 (percent): 6 Retail Outlets, All Other
      • Factors Affecting Market Growth
      • Major Marketers
      • The Competitive Situation
      • Industry Trends
      • Marketers Spend $358 Million on Advertising
      • At the Distribution Level
      • Mass Merchandisers Gaining Market Share
      • Online Retailers Proliferating
      • Retailers Develop Baby Care "Destinations" to Woo Shoppers
      • The Consumer
      The Clothing Market
      • Market Size and Growth
      • Table 1-2: U.S. Retail Sales of ITP Clothing Market, 1995-2004 (dollars)
      • Apparel Accounts for 90% of Dollar Sales
      • Factors Affecting Market Growth
      • Five Leading Marketers
      • The Competitive Situation
      • Industry Trends
      • Marketers Spend $27 Million to Advertise ITP Clothing in 1998
      • Demographics of ITP Clothing Purchasers
      The Baby Care Supplies Market
      • Market Size and Growth
      • Table 1-3: U.S. Retail Sales of Baby Care Supplies Market, 1995-2004 (dollars)
      • Diapers Account for 68% of Baby Care Sales
      • Factors Affecting Market Growth
      • Eight Major Marketers
      • The Competitive Situation
      • Industry Trends
      • 1998 Ad Expenditures Top $263 Million
      • Demographics of Baby Care Supplies Purchasers
      The Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories Market
      • Market Size and Growth
      • Table 1-4: U.S. Retail Sales of Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories Market, 1995-2004 (dollars)
      • Factors Affecting Market Growth
      • Leading Marketers
      • The Competitive Situation
      • Industry Trends
      • Marketers Spend Just $7.8 Million on Advertising
      • Demographics of JFNA Purchasers
      The ITP Toy Market
      • Market Size and Growth
      • Table 1-5: U.S. Retail Sales of ITP Toys Market, 1995-2004 (dollars)
      • Factors Affecting Market Growth
      • Mattel, Hasbro, and Newell Rubbermaid Dominate Sales
      • The Competitive Situation
      • Industry Trends
      • Over $60 Million Spent on Advertising in 1998
      • Online Retailing
      • Demographics of ITP Toy Purchasers

  2. The Overall Market
      Scope of Report
      • Three Age Groups: Infant, Toddler, and Preschool
      • Focus on Products Sold at Retail
      The Products
      • Four Product Categories
      • ITP Clothing
      • Baby Care Supplies
      • Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories
      • ITP Toys
      • Products Not Included
      • Abbreviations
      Product Safety
      • Product Safety
      Market Size and Growth
      • Methodology for Estimates
      • ITP Sales Reach $22.5 Billion in 1999
      • Clothing Leads Sales at $9.1 Billion
      • Baby Care Supplies Second at $6.1 Billion
      • Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories Third at $5.2 Billion
      • Table 2-1: Retail Sales of U.S. Infant/Toddler/Preschool Market, 1995-1999 (dollars): Clothing, Baby Care Supplies, Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories, Toys
      • ITP Toys Fairly Stagnant at $2.1 Billion
      Market Composition
      • Retail Sales by Product Category
      • Figure 2-1: Share of ITP Retail Dollar Sales by Product Category, 1999 (percent): Clothing, Baby Care Supplies, Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories, Toys
      • Sales by Retail Outlet
      • Figure 2-2: Dollar Share of U.S. ITP Sales by Retail Outlet, 1999 (percent): 6 Retail Outlets, All Other
      • Sales by Region
      • Seasonal Variances by Category
      Factors to Market Growth: Population Trends
      • Slow Growth Projected in ITP Age Group
      • Table 2-2: U.S. Population of Children Age 5 and Under, 1995-2005 (number)
      • Birth Cycles
      • Birth Rates Declining
      • Table 2-3: U.S. Live Births, Birth Rates, and Fertility Rates, 1990-1997 (number)
      • Birth Rate Projections
      • Table 2-4: Projected Number of Births in the United States, 1995-2005 (number)
      • Universe of Potential Mothers
      • Table 2-5: U.S. Population of Potential Mothers by Age Group, 1990-2005 (number)
      • More Older Women Having Babies
      • Table 2-6: U.S. Birth Rates by Age of Mother, 1975-1997 (number): From Age 15 to Age 44
      • Birth Rates and Fathers
      • Table 2-7: Birth Rates of U.S. Fathers by Age Group, 1980-1997 (number): From Age 15 to Age 44
      • Delayed Childbearing Has Positive Effects
      • Growing Ethnic Populations
      • Table 2-8: Percent Distribution of Births by Ethnic Origin, 1995-2005 (percent): 5 Ethnic Origins
      Factors to Market Growth: Other Trends
      • More Mothers in the Workforce
      • New Mothers and Education
      • The Rising Number of Double-Income Families
      • Firstborns Not Necessarily a Factor
      • The Grandparent Factor
      • Aggressive Marketing
      • New and Improved Products Stimulate Sales
      • Licensing Adds to Salability
      • The Children's Hours
      • Gift-Giving Tradition Going Strong
      Projected Market Growth
      • Sales to Top $28 Billion by 2004
      • Clothing Sales to Reach $11.1 Billion
      • Baby Care Supplies to Reach $7.5 Billion
      • Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories Will Lead Market Growth, Matching Baby Care Supplies in Sales
      • Toys to Remain Sluggish, Crawling to $2.3 Billion
      • Table 2-9: Projected Retail Sales of U.S. Infant/Toddler/Preschool Market, 1999-2004 (dollars): Clothing, Baby Care Supplies, Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories, Toys
      The Marketers
      • Number of Marketers Varies Widely by Category
      • Most Major Marketers Publicly Owned
      • Major Privately Owned Marketers
      • Recent Mergers and Acquisitions
      • Table 2-10: Leading ITP Marketers and Their Brands by Product Category (32 Marketers and Their Brands)
      The Competitive Situation
      • Major Companies Have the Edge
      • Smaller Marketers Compete Successfully in Niches
      • Fierce Competition Among the Leading Marketers
      • Strong Private-Label Penetration for Some Categories
      Marketing Trends
      • Premium Products and New Technology Pushing Prices Up
      • Licensing Continues Unabated
      • Marketers Build Direct-Mailing Lists
      • Professional Endorsements Add Authority
      • Marketers Pay More Attention to Ethnic Consumers
      Consumer Advertising Expenditures
      • Almost Three-Quarters of Ad Spending Goes to Baby Care Supplies
      • Proctor & Gamble Is Leading Advertiser
      • K-C, Mattel, Hasbro, J&J, The Gap Form Second Tier
      • Playtex, Drypers, Pfizer in Third Tier
      • Eight Other Major Advertisers
      • Licensors Run Umbrella Ads for Characters
      • Television, Print Media Popular
      Advertising Regulations
      • Regulations on Advertising to Children
      Consumer Promotions
      • Type of Promotion Depends on Category
      • Sample Packs Target New-Baby Market
      • New Baby Expos
      Trade Advertising and Promotions
      • Trade Advertising
      • Trade Promotions
      Distribution
      • Distribution Path Typical of Individual Categories
      Retail
      • Many Types of Retailers Compete in Market
      • Mass Merchandisers Woo Converts with Baby Needs
      • Specialty Store Chains
      • Supermarkets and Drugstores
      • National Department Stores
      • Local and Regional Department Stores
      • Independent Specialty Retailers
      • Online Retailers Proliferating
      • Other Retail Outlets
      At the Retail Level
      • Retailers Develop Baby Care "Destinations" to Woo Shoppers
      • Baby-Gift Registries
      • Other Retail Amenities
      The Consumer
      • Note on Simmons Market Research Bureau Data

  3. The Clothing Market
      The Products
      • All Types of Clothing Covered
      • Two Categories: Apparel and Footwear
      • Three Basic Size Ranges
      • Merchandising Seasons
      • Fashion and Basic Merchandise
      • Figure 3-1: U.S. Retail Sales of ITP Clothing, 1995-1999 (dollars)
      Market Size and Growth
      • Market Difficult to Measure
      • Government Data Conflicting: $18.5 Billion or $8.7 Billion?
      • Industry Estimates Place 1998 ITP Apparel Sales at $7.1 Billion
      • 1998 Shoe Sales Estimated at $836 Million
      • Methodology for Packaged Facts' Estimates
      • Retail Sales $9.1 Billion in 1999
      • ITP Apparel Sales Top $8.2 Billion
      • ITP Footwear Sales Edge Up to $860 Million
      • Table 3-1a: U.S. Retail Sales of ITP Clothing, 1995-1999 (dollars)
      Market Composition
      • Infant Sizes Account for One-Third of ITP Clothing Sales
      • Apparel Accounts for 90% of Dollar Sales
      • Athletic Shoes One Out of Three Pairs
      • Retail Channels for ITP Apparel
      • Mass Merchandisers Claim Largest Share of ITP Apparel Sales
      • Figure 3-2: Share of ITP Apparel Dollar Sales by Retail Outlet, 1999 (percent): 7 Types of Retail Outlet
      • ITP Footwear Channels
      • Shoe Stores Lead ITP Footwear Dollar Sales
      • Figure 3-3: Share of ITP Footwear Dollar Sales by Retail Outlet, 1999 (percent): 5 Types of Retail Outlet
      • Regional Sales
      • Sales Highest in Third and Fourth Quarters
      Factors to Market Growth
      • Demographic Trends
      • Upscaling Trend Can Push Up Dollar Sales
      • Kids' Fashion Preferences Influence Parents' Purchases
      • Licensing and Designer Labels Boost ITP Sales
      • A Large Gift Market
      • The Replacement Factor
      Projected Market Growth
      • Sales to Top $11.1 Billion by 2004
      • Table 3-1b: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of ITP Clothing, 1999-2004 (dollars)
      The Marketers
      • Hundreds of Marketers
      • Multimillion Dollar Apparel Market Leaders
      • Footwear Market Leaders
      • Adult Apparel Marketers with ITP Sizes
      • Designer Clothing
      • Licensing Companies
      • Most Major Marketers Publicly Owned
      • Secondary and Specialized Marketers
      • Some Marketers Offer Multiple Brands
      • Private Label
      • Direct Marketers
      • Table 3-2: Selected Marketers of Infant/Toddler/Preschool Clothing (32 Apparel/9 Footwear Marketers and Their Brands)
      The Competitive Situation
      • Famous-Brand Companies Dominate Market
      • Fashion Appeal Drives Sales
      • Licensing Is Big Business
      • Private Label Complements National Brands
      • Who Produces Private Label
      • Production Outsourcing Is Widespread
      • Retail Penetration Is Key
      • Competitive Focus: ITP Footwear
      Competitive Profile: William Carter Co.
      • A Venerable Company
      • Children's Themes
      • Carter's New Positioning Celebrates Imagination
      • Factory Outlets
      Competitive Profile: Gerber Childrenswear, Inc.
      • Gerber Childrenswear Banks on Baby Food Name
      • Gerber's Lines
      Competitive Profile: Healthtex (VF Corp.)
      • Company Background
      • Healthtex Promotes Play
      • Lee Kidswear
      Competitive Profile: OshKosh B'Gosh, Inc.
      • "Country Chic"
      • An Unmistakable Look
      • OshKosh B'Gosh Stores
      Competitive Profile: Stride Rite Corp.
      • The Leader in Kids' Shoes
      • Wholesale and Retail Divisions
      • Company Background
      Marketing and New Product Trends
      • Licensing
      • Licensing Trends
      • More Layette Items Displayed on Hangers
      • Pint-Size Adult Styles
      • Luxury Layettes
      Advertising Expenditures
      • Marketers Spend Over $27 Million to Advertise in 1998
      • The Gap the Leading Advertiser
      • OshKosh in Second Place
      • Garan and Stride Rite in Third Tier
      • Gerber and Carter's Only Other Advertisers of Note
      • Healthtex Returns to Advertising in 1999
      Advertising Positioning
      • Style and Design Are Primary Themes
      • Bringing Back Memories
      • Examples of Consumer Advertising
      Consumer Promotions
      • Sales Most Common Form of Promotion
      • Co-Op Advertising with Retailers
      • Joint Promotions
      • Contests
      Trade Advertising and Promotions
      • Trade Advertising
      • Trade Promotions Are Standard
      • Trade Shows
      • Examples of Trade Advertising and Promotions
      Distribution
      • Most Large Marketers Have Own Sales Forces
      • Planograms
      • Direct-to-Consumer Sales
      At the Retail Level
      • Many Types of Retailers Compete in Market
      • Mass Merchandisers Offer Value-Pricing and One-Stop Shopping
      • Sears and JCPenney Changing Strategies
      • Specialty Chains Booming
      • Some Specialty Chains Run into Problems
      • Department Stores Showcase Brands, Designers, Private Label
      • Independent Specialty Stores Depend on Fashion Appeal, Service
      • Two Types of Vendor-Owned Stores
      • Department and Specialty Stores Enjoy Highest Markups
      Retail Advertising and Promotions
      • Brand Names the Key Advertising Focus
      • Advertising Media
      • Specialty Chains Spend More on Advertising
      • Baby Registries
      • Shoppers Club Services
      Retailer Profile: The Gap, Inc.
      • The Gap, GapKids, babyGap—and Old Navy
      • GapKids and babyGap
      • Old Navy, Banana Republic, and Online
      • Sales Surge 39% During FY 1998
      Retailer Profile: Gymboree Corp.
      • Running Into Trouble?
      • Bright Colors and Displays
      • Gymboree Stores
      • New Zutopia Chain Caters to Pre-Teens
      Retailer Profile: The Children's Place Retail Stores, Inc.
      • Growing Pains
      • Company Goal: To Become a Household Brand
      • An Everyday Low Pricing Strategy
      The Consumer
      • Simmons Data on Clothing
      • Total Number of ITP Clothing Purchasers
      • Overview of Consumer Patterns
      • Tops and Sleepwear the Most Popular Items for Infants
      • Tops and Jeans the Most Popular Items for Age 1-5
      • Tops Purchasers
      • 70% of Tops Purchasers Spend Less Than $50
      • Jeans Purchasers
      • Nearly 60% of Jeans Purchasers Spend $10 to $49
      • Sleepwear Purchasers
      • More Than Half of Sleepwear Purchasers Spend Less Than $25
      • Underwear Purchasers
      • One Out of Four Purchasers Spends Less Than $10 on Underwear
      • Purchasers of Suits or Dresses
      • 40% Spend More Than $50 on Suits or Dresses
      • Outerwear Purchasers
      • More Than Half Spend Less Than $50 on Outerwear
      • Purchasers of Athletic Shoes
      • 60% of Athletic Shoes Purchasers Spend Less Than $50
      • Purchasers of Canvas Shoes
      • Three Out of Four Spend Less Than $50 on Canvas Shoes
      • Purchasers of Other Shoes
      • Only 25% of Purchasers Spend More Than $50 Annually on Other Shoes
      • Purchasers Display Upscale, Family Profile
      • Table 3-3: Consumer Overview for ITP Clothing, 1998 (percent, age, dollars)
      • Table 3-4: Purchasers of ITP Clothing by Clothing Type and Age Group of Child, 1998 (percent): 10 Clothing Types
      • Table 3-5: Amount Spent on ITP Tops or Shirts by Age Group of Child, 1998 (percent): From Under $10 to $150 or More
      • Table 3-6: Amount Spent on ITP Jeans by Age Group of Child, 1998 (percent): From Under $10 to $150 or More
      • Table 3-7: Amount Spent on ITP Sleepwear by Age Group of Child, 1998 (percent): From Under $10 to $150 or More
      • Table 3-8: Amount Spent on ITP Underwear by Age Group of Child, 1998 (percent): From Under $10 to $150 or More
      • Table 3-9: Amount Spent on ITP Suits or Dresses by Age Group of Child, 1998 (percent): From Under $10 to $150 or More
      • Table 3-10: Amount Spent on ITP Outerwear by Age Group of Child, 1998 (percent): From Under $10 to $150 or More
      • Table 3-11: Amount Spent on ITP Athletic Shoes by Age Group of Child, 1998 (percent): From Under $10 to $150 or More
      • Table 3-12: Amount Spent on ITP Canvas Shoes by Age Group of Child, 1998 (percent): From Under $10 to $150 or More
      • Table 3-13: Amount Spent on Other ITP Shoes by Age Group of Child, 1998 (percent): From Under $10 to $150 or More
      • Table 3-14: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Purchase of ITP Clothing by Child's Age Group: Under 1 Year vs. 1-5 Years, 1998 (U.S. Principal Shoppers)

  4. The Baby Care Supplies Market
      The Products
      • Three Major Product Categories
      • Products Not Included
      • Diaper Classifications
      • Skincare and Toiletries Products
      • Baby Feeding Accessories
      • Figure 4-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Baby Care Supplies, 1995-1999 (dollars)
      Market Size and Growth
      • Methodology for Estimates
      • Total Sales Near $6.1 Billion in 1999
      • Table 4-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Baby Care Supplies, 1995-1999 (dollars)
      • Diaper Sales Surpass $4.1 Billion
      • Table 4-1a: U.S. Retail Sales of Diapers, 1995-1999 (dollars)
      • Baby Skincare and Toiletries Sales Approach $1.5 Billion
      • Table 4-1b: U.S. Retail Sales of Baby Skincare and Toiletries, 1995-1999 (dollars)
      • Baby Feeding Accessories Sales Advance to $516 Million
      • Table 4-1c: U.S. Retail Sales of Baby Feeding Accessories, 1995-1999 (dollars)
      Market Composition
      • Diapers Account for 68% of Baby Care Sales
      • Figure 4-2: Share of Baby Care Supplies Retail Dollar Sales by Product Segment, 1999 (percent): Diapers, Skincare/Toiletries, Baby Feeding Accessories
      • Disposables Monopolize Diaper Sales
      • Diaper Use by Product Type
      • Training Pants Account for Growing Share of Disposables Segment
      • Most Diapers Sold in Jumbo or Mega-Packs
      • Baby Wipes Generate Half of Skincare and Toiletries Dollars
      • Table 4-2: Share of Retail Dollar Sales of Baby Skincare and Toiletries by Product Segment, 1999 (percent): 9 Product Segments
      • Sales of Baby Feeding Accessories by Type
      • Most Bottles Reusable Plastic
      • Pacifier and Teether Use
      • Baby Care Supplies Sold in Wide Range of Channels
      • Mass Merchandisers Take Over Retail Lead
      • Figure 4-3: Share of Baby Care Supplies Dollar Sales by Retail Outlet, 1999 (percent): 4 Types of Retail Outlet, All Other
      • Sales by Region
      • Most Sales Not Seasonal
      Factors to Market Growth
      • Overall Factors Are Major Influences
      • Diapers a Saturated Market
      • Technological Innovations and Marketing Can Boost Sales
      • Children Staying in Diapers Longer
      • Licensing
      • The Adult Market
      • Disposable Wipes Extending Use
      • The Phthalate Issue
      • New Debate Over Safety of Plastic Bottles
      Projected Market Growth
      • Sales to Top $7.5 Billion by 2004
      • Table 4-3: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Baby Care Supplies, 1999-2004 (dollars)
      • Diapers to Approach $4.9 Billion
      • Table 4-3a: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Diapers, 1999-2004 (dollars)
      • Skincare and Toiletries Will Lead in Growth
      • Table 4-3b: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Baby Skincare and Toiletries, 1999-2004 (dollars)
      • Baby Feeding Accessories
      • Table 4-3c: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Baby Feeding Accessories, 1999-2000 (dollars)
      The Marketers
      • About 100 Competitors
      • Major Diaper Marketers
      • Major Skincare and Toiletries Marketers
      • Major Baby Feeding Accessories Marketers
      • Table 4-4a: Leading Marketers and Brands of Baby Care Supplies: Disposable Diapers (5 Marketers and Their Brands w/Descriptions)
      • Table 4-4b: Leading Marketers and Brands of Baby Care Supplies: Baby Skincare Products (14 Marketers and Their Brands w/Descriptions)
      • Table 4-4c: Leading Marketers and Brands of Baby Care Supplies: Baby Toiletries (8 Marketers and Their Brands w/Descriptions)
      • Table 4-4d: Leading Marketers and Brands of Baby Care Supplies: Baby Feeding Accessories (12 Marketers and Their Brands w/Descriptions)
      Marketer and Brand Shares
      • Note on Share Data
      • Kimberly-Clark, Procter & Gamble the Dominant Marketers
      • Six Marketers in Second Tier with 1% to 4% Shares
      • Kimberly-Clark Leads Procter & Gamble in Diapers
      • Kimberly-Clark Leads Skincare and Toiletries; Johnson & Johnson, Proctor &Gamble, Unilever Follow
      • Kimberly-Clark Dominates Baby Wipes
      • Johnson & Johnson Rules in Baby Oils, Lotions, Powder, Soap, and Shampoo
      • Unilever Heads Cotton Swabs/Cotton Balls with Q-Tips
      • Pfizer's Desitin a Strong Leader in Diaper Rash Preparations
      • Vaseline Virtually the Only Brand of Petroleum Jelly
      • Playtex Leads Fragmented Baby Feeding Accessories Category
      • Playtex Leads Baby Bottles and Feeding Accessories
      • Gerber Products, First Years Lead Baby Soothing Accessories
      • Table 4-5: Share of U.S. Baby Care Supplies Market by Marketer and Brand, 1998 vs. 1999 (percent): 8 Marketers/19 Brands, All Other Brands, Private Label
      • Table 4-6: Share of U.S. Disposable Diapers Market by Marketer and Brand, 1998 vs. 1999 (percent): 5 Marketers/15 Brands, All Other Brands, Private Label
      • Table 4-7: Share of U.S. Skincare and Toiletries Market by Marketer and Brand, 1998 vs. 1999 (percent): 7 Marketers/13 Brands, All Other Brands, Private Label
      • Table 4-8: Share of U.S. Baby Wipes Market by Marketer and Brand, 1998 vs. 1999 (percent): 4 Marketers/13 Brands, All Other Brands, Private Label
      • Table 4-9: Share of U.S. Baby Oils Market by Marketer and Brand, 1998 vs. 1999 (percent): 3 Marketers/5 Brands, All Other Brands, Private Label
      • Table 4-10: Share of U.S. Baby Lotions Market by Marketer and Brand, 1998 vs. 1999 (percent): 3 Marketers/5 Brands, All Other Brands, Private Label
      • Table 4-11: Share of U.S. Baby Powder Market by Marketer and Brand, 1998 vs. 1999 (percent): 6 Marketers/8 Brands, All Other Brands, Private Label
      • Table 4-12: Share of U.S. Baby Soap Market by Marketer and Brand, 1998 vs. 1999 (percent): 3 Marketers/8 Brands, All Other Brands, Private Label
      • Table 4-13: Share of U.S. Cotton Swabs/Cotton Balls Market by Marketer and Brand, 1998 vs. 1999 (percent): 3 Marketers/4 Brands, All Other Brands, Private Label
      • Table 4-14: Share of U.S. Diaper Rash Preparations Market by Marketer and Brand, 1998 vs. 1999 (percent): 4 Marketers/5 Brands, All Other Brands, Private Label
      • Table 4-15: Share of U.S. Baby Feeding Accessories Market by Marketer and Brand, 1998 vs. 1999 (percent): 8 Marketers/10 Brands, All Other Brands, Private Label
      • Table 4-16: Share of U.S. Baby Bottles and Feeding Accessories Market by Marketer and Brand, 1998 vs. 1999 (percent): 10 Marketers/11 Brands, All Other Brands, Private Label
      • Table 4-17: Share of U.S. Baby Soothing Accessories Market by Marketer and Brand, 1998 vs. 1999 (percent): 8 Marketers/10 Brands, All Other Brands
      The Competitive Situation: Diapers
      • A Fiercely Competitive Market
      • Procter & Gamble vs. Kimberly-Clark
      • K-C Wins; P&G Starts Price Wars
      • Their Major Rival: Private Label
      • Drypers Up-and-Coming
      • A Rash Maneuver
      • K-C Dominates Training Pants Segment
      • …And Pioneers Swim Diapers
      • Pampering Larger Children
      • Cloth Diapers and Diaper Services Continue Their Decline
      The Competitive Situation: Skincare and Toiletries
      • Diaper Rivalry Spills Over into Baby Wipes
      • Private Label Significant in Baby Wipes
      • PL, Q-Tips Dominate Cotton Swabs/Cotton Balls
      • Johnson & Johnson Rules Skincare; Playtex Acquires Baby Magic
      • Most Diaper Rash Preparations from Pharmaceutical Companies
      The Competitive Situation: Baby Feeding Accessories
      • Design and Innovations, Retail Penetration Are Key
      Competitive Profile: Drypers Corp.
      • The Number-Three Diaper Marketer
      • Marketing Strategy: Cost-Effective Innovations
      • Drypers Second in Training Pants
      • Drypers Branches Out to Baby Wipes
      • Drypers Begins National Advertising
      Competitive Profile: Johnson & Johnson
      • A Leader in Healthcare and Baby Skincare
      • The Leader in ITP Skincare Products
      • J&J Expands to BFA
      • Big Plans for Adult Skincare
      Competitive Profile: Kimberly-Clark Corp.
      • The Leader in Personal Paper Products
      • Kimberly-Clark Diaper Strategy Based on Innovation
      • Kimberly-Clark Buys Scott Paper
      Competitive Profile: Playtex Products, Inc.
      • Company Background
      • Acquisitions Make Playtex Third-Largest Baby Care Player
      • Playtex's Baby Care Businesses
      • Playtex Faltering with Chubs and Baby Magic
      Competitive Profile: Procter & Gamble Co.
      • Company Background
      • Pampers the Premium Brand
      • Luvs Positioned on Value; Barney Tie-In
      Marketing and New Product Trends
      • Market Shifts Back to Unisex Diapers
      • Diapers with Skin-Protection, Antibacterial Strength
      • Licensing Adds an Edge
      • Professional Endorsements
      • Private Labeler Making Waves in Wipes
      • Non-Traditional Skincare Products
      • Upscale Toiletries for Tots
      • Baby Feeding Innovations
      Advertising Expenditures
      • 1998 Ad Expenditures Top $263 Million
      • P&G the Leading Advertiser
      • Kimberly-Clark Second
      • Johnson & Johnson in Third Place
      • Four Other Major Advertisers
      • Diverse Media
      Advertising Positioning
      • Most Baby Care Products Positioned on Performance
      • Most Ads Show Cute Kids
      • Disposable Diaper Ads Emphasize Dryness, Absorbency, Skincare
      • Rash Guards Show Crying Infant
      • Training Pants Ads Provide Parenting Tips
      • Baby Wipes Ads Positioned on Formulation, Uses
      • Skincare Products Positioned on Formulation
      • Baby Bottles/Nursers Convenient, Healthful
      • Toddler Cups and Sports Bottles Spillproof
      • Celebrity Spokespersons
      • Examples of Consumer Advertising
      Consumer Promotions
      • Products Heavily Couponed
      • Some Marketers Also Use Rebates
      • Gift Certificates
      • Merchandise Promotions
      • Photo Contests
      • Charitable Contributions
      • Free Samples Often Distributed Through Institutions
      • Direct-Mail Promotions
      • Example of Consumer Promotions
      Trade Advertising and Promotions
      • Ads Follow Typical Trade Ad Format
      • Trade Promotions Are Standard
      Distribution
      • Distribution Is Standard
      • Niche Items Distributed Through Mail or Phone Order
      • Wholesalers Important to Smaller Retailers
      At the Retail Level
      • Mass Merchandisers and Supermarkets the Dominant Outlets
      • Mass Merchandisers
      • Supermarkets Seek to Retake Market Share
      • Will "E-tailing" Become a Factor?
      • Average Margins: Disposable Diapers Often Used as Loss Leaders
      • Margins Significantly Higher in Skincare/Toiletries and Baby Feeding Accessories
      • Diapers Turn Faster that Other Baby Care Supplies
      • Shelving and Display: Diapers
      • Shelving and Display: Skincare and Toiletries
      • Shelving and Display: Baby Feeding Accessories
      • Shelf Space
      • Assortments
      • Retail Promotions
      The Consumer
      • Note Regarding Simmons Data
      • Overview of Consumer Patterns for Principal Shoppers
      • Overview of Consumer Patterns for U.S. Adults
      • Household Penetration Varies by Product and Child's Age
      • Nine Out of 10 Shoppers with Babies Use Disposable Diapers
      • 5.6 Million Consumers Use Disposable Training Pants
      • Cloth Diaper Users
      • Different Profiles for Medium vs. Heavy Users
      • Regular and Thin Diapers Equally Popular
      • Disposable Diapers by Brand
      • 85% of Shoppers with Babies Use Baby Wipes
      • 46% Are Light Users
      • Age, Region, Household Size Are Indicators in Brand Selection
      • Cotton Swabs a Staple in Most Households
      • 4 Million Shoppers Use Baby Bottles/Nursers
      • Use of Baby Oil and Lotion
      • Baby Oil and Baby Lotion Use by Brand
      • Baby Powder One of the Least Popular Products for Babies
      • Baby Powder Use by Brand
      • 26 Million Use Baby Soap/Baby Bath
      • Baby Soap/Baby Bath Usage by Brand
      • 19 Million Use Baby Shampoo for Babies and Children Under 5
      • Baby Shampoo Use by Brand
      • 21 Million Use Diaper Rash Preparations
      • Diaper Rash Preparations by Brand
      • Table 4-18a: Consumer Overview for Baby Care Supplies, 1998 (percent, median age, household income): 6 Product Classifications/5 Brands
      • Table 4-18b: Consumer Overview for Baby Care Supplies, 1998 (percent, median age, household income): 5 Product Classifications/10 Brands
      • Table 4-19a: Household Penetration of Baby Care Supplies, 1998 (U.S. Principal Shoppers): 6 Product Classifications
      • Table 4-19b: Household Penetration of Baby Care Supplies, 1998 (U.S. Adults): 5 Product Classifications
      • Table 4-20: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Use of Diapers by Type, 1998 (U.S. Principal Shoppers): Disposable Diapers, Disposable Training Pants, Cloth Diapers
      • Table 4-21: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Use of Disposable Diapers: Medium vs. Heavy Users, 1998 (U.S. Principal Shoppers)
      • Table 4-22: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Use of Disposable Diapers by Type: Regular vs. Thin, 1998 (U.S. Principal Shoppers)
      • Table 4-23: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Use of Disposable Diapers by Brand, 1998 (U.S. Principal Shoppers): Huggies, Pampers, Luvs
      • Table 4-24: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Use of Baby Wipes/Premoistened Towelettes, 1998 (U.S. Principal Shoppers)
      • Table 4-25: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Use of Baby Wipes by Usage Level, 1998 (U.S. Principal Shoppers): Heavy, Medium, and Light Users
      • Table 4-26: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Use of Baby Wipes by Brand: Pampers Baby Fresh vs. Chubs, 1998 (U.S. Principal Shoppers)
      • Table 4-27: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Use of Cotton Swabs, 1998 (U.S. Principal Shoppers)
      • Table 4-28: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Use of Baby Bottles/Nursers, 1998 (U.S. Principal Shoppers)
      • Table 4-29: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Use of Baby Oil and Baby Lotion, 1998 (U.S. Adults): Babies & Children Under 5, All Johnson's Users, All Baby Magic Users
      • Table 4-30: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Use of Baby Powder, 1998 (U.S. Adults): Babies & Children Under 5, All Johnson's Users, All Baby Magic Users
      • Table 4-31: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Use of Baby Soap/Baby Bath by Brand, 1998 (U.S. Adults): All, Johnson's/Most Often, Baby Magic/Most Often
      • Table 4-32: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Use of Baby Shampoo by Brand, 1998 (U.S. Adults): Babies & Children Under 5, All Johnson's Users/Most Often, All Baby Magic Users/Most Often
      • Table 4-33: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Use of Diaper Rash Preparations by Brand, 1998 (U.S. Adults): All, Desitin, A&D Ointment

    Volume Two

  5. The Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories Market
      The Products
      • Market Definition
      • Two Segments: Hard Goods and Soft Goods/Accessories
      • Hard Goods Products
      • Cribs
      • Car Seats
      • New Standardized Anchors for Car Seats
      • Strollers
      • High Chairs
      • Baby Swings, Baby Walkers, and Stationary Entertainers
      • Play Yards
      • The Soft Goods and Nursery Accessories Category
      • Products Not Included
      Product Safety
      • Safety Regulated by Two Federal Agencies
      • JPMA Certification
      • Product Recalls
      • Figure 5-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories, 1995-1999 (dollars)
      Market Size and Growth
      • Retail Sales Difficult to Quantify
      • Methodology Used to Determine Market Size
      • Retail Sales Exceed $5.2 Billion in 1999
      • Table 5-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories, 1995-1999 (dollars)
      • Conflicting Industry Estimates for Sales of Subcategories
      Market Composition
      • Top JFNA Products
      • Retail Channels for Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories
      • Mass Merchandisers and National Department Stores Are Top Outlets for JFNA Sales
      • Figure 5-2: Share of JFNA Dollar Sales by Retail Outlet, 1999 (percent): 5 Types of Retail Outlet, All Other
      • Retail Sales Vary by Product Segment
      • Regional Purchasing Indices for Infant and Children's Furniture
      • Table 5-2: Regionality of Purchase of Infant Furniture and Children's Furniture, 1998 (percent and index): Northeast, East Central, West Central, Southeast, Southwest, Pacific
      Factors to Market Growth
      • Demographic Trends
      • New Product Classifications Boost Sales
      • Consumers Willing to Pay More for Value-Added Designs
      • New, Safer Product Designs Also Boost Sales
      • Demographic Trends Expand Boundaries of Gift-Giving
      • Licensed Products Are Strong
      • Distribution Channels Expanding
      • More Emphasis by Retailers
      Projected Market Growth
      • Sales to Reach $7.5 Billion by 2004
      • Table 5-3: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories, 1999-2004 (dollars)
      The Marketers
      • Number and Types of Marketers
      • Leading Marketers
      • Secondary Marketers
      • Luxury Imports
      • Table 5-4: Selected Marketers of Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories (37 Marketers and Their Brands)
      The Competitive Situation
      • A Few Companies Dominate Juvenile Furniture
      • Mergers and Acquisitions Consolidate Industry
      • …Yet, There Are More Marketers Than Ever
      • Retail Penetration Vital
      Competitive Profile: Crown Crafts, Inc.
      • ITP Textiles Leader
      • Crown Crafts Builds ITP Business Through Acquisitions
      • Crown Crafts Extending Licenses
      Competitive Profile: Evenflo Co., Inc.
      • Company Background
      • JFNA Products
      • Fading Former Dominance in Bottles
      Competitive Profile: Newell Rubbermaid, Inc.
      • Company Background
      • Will Newellization Aid Rubbermaid?
      • Little Tikes Co.
      • Graco Children's Products, Inc.
      • Century Products Co.
      Competitive Profile: Safety 1st, Inc.
      • Starts with "Baby On Board"
      • Cutting Edge Designs
      • Hardware Alliance Opens New Doors
      Marketing and New Product Trends
      • Fewer Viable Licenses than Clothing or Toys
      • Upscaling Products to Command Higher Prices
      • Versatility Extends Product Use
      • Convenience and Ease of Use
      • Smarter Baby Aids
      • Soft Goods Reflect Adult Home Furnishings Trends
      Advertising Expenditures
      • Marketers Spend Just $7.8 Million on Advertising
      • Fisher-Price, Mondial, Evenflo the Leading Spenders
      • Minor Advertisers
      • Magazines the Sole Medium for Most Advertisers
      Advertising Positioning
      • Ad Themes Promote Design Features, Safety, and Quality
      • Value-Added Ads Offer Parenting Tips
      • Examples of Consumer Advertising
      Consumer Promotions
      • Seasonal Sales Are Most Frequent Promotion
      • Direct Mail
      Trade Advertising and Promotions
      • Trade Advertising
      • Trade Promotions
      Distribution
      • Most Sales Are Direct to Retailers
      • Smaller Marketers and Retailers Rely on Wholesalers
      • Wholesaler Services
      • Direct Sales to Consumers
      At the Retail Level
      • A Wide Array of Retail Channels
      • Breadth of Merchandise Varies by Outlet…
      • … As Does Floor Space
      • Display in Mass Merchandisers and Superstores Utilitarian
      • Upscale Stores Use Thematic Settings
      • Nursery Accessories Displays
      • Average Gross Margins
      • Retail Promotions
      The Consumer
      • Simmons Data on Juvenile Furniture and Nursery Accessories
      • Overview of Consumer Patterns
      • 65% of Infant Furniture Purchasers Spend Under $250
      • Six Out of 10 Children's Furniture Purchasers Spend Under $250
      • Demographics of Infant Furniture Purchasers
      • Demographics of Children's Furniture Purchasers
      • Quality, Price, and Safety the Most Important Factors
      • Table 5-5: Consumer Overview for Juvenile Furniture, 1998 (percent, median age, household income)
      • Table 5-6: Amount Spent on Juvenile Furniture: Infant Furniture vs. Children's Furniture, 1998 (U.S. Adults)
      • Table 5-7: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Purchase of Juvenile Furniture: Infant Furniture vs. Children's Furniture, 1998 (U.S. Adults)

  6. The ITP TOYS Market
    • The Products
      • Market Definition
      • Products Not Included
      • Focus on Retail
      • Two Product Segments
      • Significant Cross Use
      Product Safety
      • Toys Regulated by Federal Government
      • Age Grading and Labeling Toys
      • Figure 6-1: U.S. Retail Sales of ITP Toys, 1995-1999 (dollars)
      Market Size and Growth
      • Methodology Used to Determine Market Size
      • Retail Sales Top $2.1 Billion in 1999
      • Table 6-1: U.S. Retail Sales of ITP Toys, 1995-1999 (dollars)
      Market Composition
      • ITP Segment Accounts for 10% of Total Retail Toy Dollars
      • Preschool Toys Account for Two-Thirds of ITP Toy Sales
      • Toys by Product Type
      • Table 6-2: Share of Dollar Sales of ITP Toys by Product Type, 1998 (percent): 16 Product Types
      • ITP Toys Sold in Wide Range of Channels
      • Mass Merchandisers Claim 47% of Retail Sales
      • Figure 6-2: Share of ITP Toy Dollar Sales by Retail Outlet, 1998 (percent): 5 Types of Retail Outlet, All Other
      • Regional Purchasing Indices for ITP Toys
      • Table 6-3: Regionality of Purchasers of Infant Toys and Preschool Toys, 1998 (percent and index): Northeast, East Central, West Central, Southeast, Southwest, Pacific
      • Seasonal Sales
      Factors to Market Growth
      • Toys Affected by ITP Demographics
      • Market Reflects Stages of Child Development
      • Higher-Ticket Toys Can Boost Dollar Sales
      • Toys Help Kids Reach Their Full Potential
      • More Marketers Targeting Specialty Toy Marketplace
      • Kids Getting Older Younger
      • Grandparents Devoting More Time and Money to Grandchildren
      • Media Exposure Creates Hot Items
      • Competition from Electronic Media
      • E-Commerce Adding to Retail Competition
      • The Effects of Retail Consolidation
      • Phthalate Controversy Negatively Affects Infant Toys
      Projected Market Growth
      • Sales to Crawl to $2.3 Billion by 2004
      • Table 6-4: Projected U.S. Retail Sales of ITP Toys, 1999-2004 (dollars)
      The Marketers
      • Approximately 100 Marketers in Field
      • The Three Dominant Marketers
      • Leading Niche Marketers
      • Licensing
      • Minor Marketers
      • Private Label
      • Table 6-5: Selected Marketers and Brands of ITP Toys (37 Marketers and Their Brands)
      The Competitive Situation
      • Mass Market a Two-Player Game
      • Yet, New Companies Can Succeed
      • Different Cast of Characters at Independent Retailers
      Competitive Profile: Hasbro, Inc.
      • Company Background
      • Hasbro Announces Sweeping Restructuring
      • Hasbro's Lines and Brands
      • Hasbro's ITP Business
      • Antibacterial Toys Get Lukewarm Reception
      • Recent and Upcoming ITP Toy Introductions
      Competitive Profile: Lego Systems, Inc.
      • An Empire Built on Blocks
      • Marketing Strategy Includes Joint Promotions
      • Theme Park
      Competitive Profile: Mattel, Inc.
      • The World's Largest Toy Maker
      • Mattel Builds Its Preschool Business
      • Mattel Brings All Preschool Products Under Fisher-Price Name
      • Mattel Under Fire for Learning Company Acquisition
      Competitive Profile: Newell Rubbermaid, Inc.
      • Company Background
      • Little Tikes Concentrates Largely in Outdoor Toys
      • Will Little Tikes Rebound from Troubled Times?
      • Recent Toy Introductions
      Marketing and New Product Trends
      • Toys Tied to TV Shows, Movies, and Books
      • Fisher-Price Develops Television Show
      • Educational Positioning
      • Talkative High-Tech Toys with Computer Chips
      Advertising Expenditures
      • Only ITP Toys Covered
      • Over $60 Million Spent in 1998
      • Mattel the Biggest Spender
      Advertising Positioning
      • Infant Toys Target Adults; Preschool Toys Target Kids and Adults
      • Fun Is Main Theme
      • The Ups and Downs of Parenthood
      • Educational Positioning
      • Just Like Dad's
      • Examples of Consumer Advertising
      Consumer Promotions
      • Most FSI Coupons Placed by Retailers
      • Rebates
      • Joint Promotions
      • Merchandise Offers Build Characters
      • Contests and Sweepstakes
      • Theme Park Sponsorship
      Trade Advertising and Promotions
      • Trade Advertising
      • Trade Promotions Are Standard
      • Trade Shows Important to Introduce New Toys
      Distribution
      • Major Marketers Sell Directly
      • Most Toys Delivered Through Warehouses
      • Many Smaller Retailers Require Direct Store Delivery
      At the Retail Level
      • Many Types of Retailers Compete in Market
      • Mass Merchandisers Use Toys as Traffic Builders
      • Specialty Store Chains
      • Independent Toy Stores
      • Other Retailers Opportunistic
      • Online Retailing
      • Average Margins
      • Floor Space Varies Widely…
      • …As Does Visual Merchandising
      • Retail Advertising
      • Retail Promotions
      Retailer Profile: eToys, Inc.
      • The Nation's Leading Online Toy Retailer
      Retailer Profile: K-B Toys
      • The Largest Mall-Based Toy Retailer
      • Four Store Formats
      • K-B's Marketing Strategy
      • Big Plans for KBkids.com
      Retailer Profile: Toysmart.com, Inc.
      • Focus on "Good Toys"
      • Disney Buys In
      Retailer Profile: Toys "R" Us, Inc.
      • Toys "Were" Us
      • A Holiday Turnaround?
      • Kids "R" Us
      • Babies "R" Us
      • Imaginarium
      • Website a Qualified Success
      The Consumer
      • Simmons Data on ITP Toys
      • Overview of Consumer Patterns
      • Almost 40% of Infant Toy Purchasers Spend $10 to $24
      • More Purchasers Spend More on Preschool Toys
      • Profiles of Infant and Preschool Toy Purchasers Quite Similar
      • Table 6-6: Consumer Overview for Toys, 1998 (percent, median age, household income)
      • Table 6-7: Amount Spent on Toys: Infant Toys vs. Preschool Toys, 1998 (U.S. Adults)
      • Table 6-8: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Purchase of Toys: Infant Toys vs. Preschool Toys, 1998 (U.S. Adults)

      Appendix I: Examples of Consumer and Trade Advertising and Promotions
      Appendix II: Addresses of Selected Marketers

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