The U.S. Hispanic Market: Looking to the Future, 4th Edition

 
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Published Oct 1, 2003 | 298 Pages | Pub ID: LA871385

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The U.S. Hispanic Market: Looking to the Future
The explosive growth of the U.S. Hispanic market over the past two decades has been fueled by a massive influx of Latino immigrants in search of the American dream. As time goes on, however, a greater and greater percentage of Hispanic population growth will come from Latinos born in the United States. The strategic implications of this ongoing demographic shift provide the unifying theme of the 2003 edition of Packaged Facts U.S. Hispanic Market. The report takes an in-depth look at the impact of this fundamental change in the Hispanic population in the United States in areas such as cultural identity, language preferences, media choices, and advertising strategies.

This Packaged Facts report provides an up-to-date analysis of nearly 40 million Hispanic consumers, now the largest minority group in the United States. The report begins with key demographic highlights of the Hispanic population, including population growth trends and employment and income patterns. The report continues with a series of chapters designed to help marketers understand critical aspects of the consumer behavior of Hispanics. These chapters include analyses of Hispanic consumer expenditure patterns; the impact of cultural identity and nationality on Latino consumer behavior; Hispanic families and their children as a driving market force; and the growing market significance of the next generation of Hispanics. The report then provides an overview of marketing and advertising trends in the Hispanic market and an assessment of media usage by Latinos. The final section of the report includes chapters providing insights into ongoing changes within the Hispanic market, including a projection of Latino buying power through 2008, an analysis of population shifts affecting the Hispanic market, an assessment of current trends and marketing opportunities, and a look into the Hispanic market of the future.

Report Methodology
The information in The U.S. Hispanic Market is based on both primary and secondary research. Primary research involved interviews with experts, public relations and industry analysts in firms that specialize in Hispanic market research. Secondary research entailed data-gathering from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature. The analysis of consumer demographics derives from Simmons Market Research Bureau survey data for spring 2003.

About the Authors
Dr. Robert Brown and Ms. Ruth Washton have written 17 Packaged Facts reports analyzing demographic trends and marketing strategies in key consumer segments. Topics have ranged from kids to mature consumers to multicultural groups such as Hispanics and African Americans. Dr. Brown and Ms. Washton have co-authored several Financial Times Business Reports on strategic business issues and have provided market and competitor intelligence studies for clients in a variety of industries. Dr. Brown has a B.S. from Georgetown University and a Ph.D. degree from The George Washington University. Ms. Washton has a B.A from Skidmore College and an M.A. from the State University of New York.

What You’ll Get in this Report
The U.S. Hispanic Market is a forward-looking look at the wildly diverse market represented by the Hispanic population. Identify the enduring cultural values driving the consumer behavior of Latino families. Learn what Cubans in Miami, Mexicans in Los Angeles, and Dominicans in New York have in common…and how they differ. Discover how the next generation of Latinos is changing Hispanic media and marketing. Find out how the new geography of the Hispanic market is creating growth areas for marketers. The report addresses the following segments:

  • The Hispanic Population Today(including population patterns, economic profiles and social issues affecting Latinos)
  • Consumer Behavior
  • Language, Identity and Culture (and how they affect consumer behavior)
  • Nationality and the Latino Consumer
  • Families and Younger Latinos
  • Marketing to the Hispanic Consumer (including advertising trends and media usage)
  • The Changing Shape of the Hispanic Market (including buying power and new geographic patterns)

Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

Scroll down to see a more detailed outline of the contents of this report.

How You Will Benefit from this Report
If your company is already competing in the Hispanic market, or is considering making the leap, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current demographic profile of the Hispanic American market, as well as market growth and trends through 2008. Contributing to that understanding will be a complete analysis of data from published and trade sources, a detailed discussion of the Hispanic market based on Simmons data, and in-depth examinations of the economic and societal trends that influence the consumer behaviors of largest minority group in the country.

This report will help:

  • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for Hispanic Americans.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for products targeting Hispanic Americans.
  • Advertising agencies working with clients in the industries chasing Hispanics to help understand the product buyer to develop messages and images that compel Hispanic Americans to purchase these products.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.

Chapter 1: Executive Summary
Introduction
  • Background
  • Overview of Report

Scope and Methodology

  • Market Definition
  • Methodology

Current Population Trends

  • Hispanics Become Largest Minority Group
  • Hispanic Population Growth Continues Long-term Trend
  • Hispanic Population Will Continue Exceptional Growth
  • Hispanic Population Far Younger than Average

Economic Profile

  • Hispanics’ Income Outpaces Non-Hispanics’
  • More than 3 Million Latino Households Have $50,000+ Income
  • Married-Couple Hispanic Families Set Economic Standard
  • Number of Latino Homeowners Skyrockets

Social Issues Affecting Latinos Today

  • College Enrollment Shows Steady Increase
  • Hispanic Health Profile Shows Pattern
  • Hispanics Least Likely to Have Health Insurance
  • Discrimination Seen as Major Problem

Overview of Hispanic Consumers

  • Hispanics Spend More of Their Reported Income
  • Hispanic Consumer Units Show Clear Differences
  • Hispanics Outspend Non-Hispanics in Several Categories

Language, Identity, Culture, and the Hispanic Consumer

  • Most Younger Latinos Are U.S.-Born
  • U.S.-Born Hispanics Have More Favorable Economic Profile
  • Spanish Language Retains Strong Hold
  • English-Language Use Correlates with Income and Occupation
  • Young Hispanics Use More English
  • Nearly 2.6 Million Hispanic Households “Linguistically Isolated”
  • Identity Tied to Language and Generation
  • Family Remains Central to Latino Life
  • Latinos Believe in the American Dream

Nationality and the Latino Consumer

  • Mexicans Account for Two-Thirds of Hispanic Population
  • But “New Latinos” Change Hispanic Landscape
  • National Groups Exhibit Distinct Characteristics
  • All Nationalities Agree on Importance of Family

Hispanic Families and Their Kids

  • Large Families Predominate
  • Hispanic Kids Have Fuller Home Lives
  • Latino Moms More Likely to Stay at Home
  • Kids More Likely to Live with Both Parents If Foreign-Born
  • U.S.-Born Hispanics Have Smaller Families
  • Assimilated Hispanic Moms Less Likely to Stay at Home
  • Foreign-Born Latinos Concerned about Future of Family Ties
  • Less Acculturated Parents Indulge Their Kids More

The New Latino Generation

  • More than One in Three Hispanics Are Aged 15 to 34
  • Most Hispanic Youth and Young Adults Are Immigrants
  • Age at Immigration Key Factor in Language Usage
  • Latino Urban Youth Prefer English and “Spanglish”
  • Lifestyles of Hispanic 20-somethings Show Cultural Differences
  • Less Acculturated Young Adults Depend More on Television
  • Radio Listening Habits Reflect Diverse Tastes

Marketing and Advertising Strategies

  • Hispanic Marketers Think Nationally and Act Locally
  • New Product Development Growing in Importance
  • Community Involvement Key Component
  • Younger Latinos Reached through Music, Celebrities,
  • and Grassroots Marketing
  • Direct Mail More Widely Used
  • Online Marketing Seen as Next Frontier in Hispanic Market
  • Hispanic Ad Budgets Continue Double-Digit Growth
  • In-Language Advertising Still Seen as Most Effective

Hispanics and the Media

  • Hispanics Live in Bilingual Media World
  • Publishers of Spanish-Language Magazines Look to U.S. Market
  • New Spanish-Language Dailies Launched
  • Univision/Hispanic Broadcasting Merger Creates First Hispanic Media Giant
  • Mainstream Cable Plans More Spanish-Language Brand Extensions
  • Cable Operators Seek to Grow Hispanic Market
  • Network TV Looks More to Latinos
  • Hispanic Radio Shows Continuing Growth

Size and Growth of the Hispanic Market

  • Hispanic Spending Grows at Faster Rate
  • Studies See Exceptional Growth in Hispanic Market
  • Buying Power Used as Measure of Hispanic Market Hispanic Buying Power Will Top $900 Billion in 2008

The New Geography of the Hispanic Market

  • Latino Migration Begins to Change Landscape
  • Southern States Continue to Show Fastest Growth
  • Fastest-Growing Markets Lie outside Traditional Hispanic Areas
  • Hispanic Consumers Affect Bottom Lines in More Localities

Trends and Opportunities—Present and Future

  • Hispanic Market No Longer an Opportunity but a Necessity
  • Increasing Segmentation Likely in Future
  • “Hispanic” Won’t Necessarily Mean “Spanish”
  • Number of Affluent Hispanics Increases
  • Wide Range of Industries See Possibilities in Hispanic Market

Chapter 2: Current Population Trends
Size and Growth of the Hispanic Population

  • Hispanics Become Largest Minority Group
  • Table 2-1: U.S. Population by Race and Hispanic Origin, July 2002
  • Table 2-2: Population Growth, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Population, April 2000 to July 2002
  • Hispanic Population Growth Continues Long-term Trend
  • Table 2-3: Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Populations, 1980 vs. 2002
  • Figure 2-1: Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Population Growth, 1980-2002
  • Hispanic Population Will Continue Exceptional Growth
  • Table 2-4: Projected Growth of Hispanic and U.S. Populations, 2003-2008
  • Table 2-5: Hispanics and Non-Hispanics as Percent of U.S. Population,
  • 2003-2008

Age and Gender

  • Hispanic Population Far Younger than Average
  • Table 2-6: Population by Selected Age Group, Hispanics vs. Other Population Groups, July 2002
  • Latinos Have Above-Average Share of Young Age Groups
  • Table 2-7: Hispanics as Percent of Total Population by Selected Age Group, July 2002
  • Younger Average Age Means More Male Hispanics
  • Table 2-8: Population by Gender, Hispanics vs. Other Population Groups, Jul-02

Regional Distribution

  • Latinos Concentrated in Western Region
  • Table 2-9: Hispanic Population by Region, March 2002
  • Hispanics Tend to Live in Metropolitan Areas
  • Table 2-10: Hispanic Population by Metropolitan vs. Non-Metropolitan Residence, March 2002

Chapter 3: Economic Profile
Income Levels

  • Hispanics’ Income Outpaces Non-Hispanics’
  • Table 3-1: Aggregate Personal and Household Income, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 1981 vs. 2001
  • Personal Incomes Still Lag
  • Table 3-2: Mean Income of People 15 Years and Over, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 2001
  • Table 3-3: Earnings of Full-Time, Year-Round Workers 15 Years and Over, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic, 2001
  • Table 3-4: Earnings of Full-Time, Year-Round Male Workers 15 Years and Over, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic, 2001
  • Table 3-5: Earnings of Full-Time, Year-Round Female Workers 15 Years
  • and Over, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic, 2001
  • Gap in Household Incomes Narrower
  • Table 3-6: Mean Household and Family Income, Hispanics vs.
  • Non-Hispanics, 2001
  • More than 3 Million Latino Households Have $50,000+ Income
  • Table 3-7: Total Money Income of Households by Type, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic, 2001
  • Married-Couple Hispanic Families Set Economic Standard
  • Table 3-8: Total Money Income of Families by Type, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic, 2001
  • Majority of Latino Families Are Homeowners
  • Table 3-9: Household Tenure by Household Type, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 2002
  • Number of Latino Homeowners Skyrockets
  • Table 3-10: Number of Homeowners, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 1994-2002
  • Table 3-11: Growth in Number of New Homeowners, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 1995-2002

Employment and Occupational Patterns

  • Hispanic Men More Likely To Be in Labor Force
  • Table 3-12: Labor Force Status, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 2002
  • Table 3-13: Employment Status of the Population 16 Years of Age and Over, by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2002
  • More than 2.2 Million Hispanics in Professional and Managerial Jobs
  • Table 3-14: Occupations of Hispanics and Non-Hispanics, 2002
  • Latino Women More Likely to Be Managers and Professionals
  • Table 3-15: Leading Occupations of Hispanic Men and Women, 2002

Chapter 4: Social Issues Affecting Latinos Today
Educational Attainment

  • Latinos Still Trail
  • Table 4-1: Educational Attainment of the Population 25 Years and Over, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 2002
  • Latino Kids Begin to Change Educational Landscape
  • Table 4-2: Growth in School Enrollment of 3- to 24-Year-Olds, Hispanics vs. Non- Hispanics, by Age Group, 1980-2000
  • Table 4-3: School Enrollment of Hispanics 3 to 24 Years of Age,
  • by Age Group, 1980 vs. 2000
  • Study Places Latino Dropout Rate in Perspective
  • Hispanic Enrollment in Degree-Granting Institutions Shows
  • Steady Increase
  • Table 4-4: Enrollment Rates in Degree-Granting Institutions, by Race and Hispanic Origin, Selected Years, 1972-2001
  • Table 4-5: Enrollment in Degree-Granting Institutions, by Race and Hispanic Origin, 1980 vs. 2000
  • Table 4-6: States with Largest Hispanic Enrollment in Degree-Granting Institutions, Fall 2000
  • Table 4-7: Degrees Earned by Hispanics, 1981 vs. 2000
  • Latinos Favor Two-Year Institutions

Health Issues

  • Hispanic Health Profile Shows Pattern
  • Table 4-8: Key Indicators of Health for U.S. Adults, by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2002
  • Hispanics Least Likely to Have Health Insurance
  • Table 4-9: Access to Health Insurance and Medical Care, by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2002
  • Table 4-10: Reported Problems with Getting, Accessing, and Paying for
  • Health-Care Services, by Race/Ethnicity
  • Foreign-Born Latinos Face Greater Difficulties with Health Care System
  • Table 4-11: Latinos Reported Health Insurance Coverage,
  • by Foreign/Native-Born, Primary Language, and Income
  • Table 4-12: Latinos Reported Health Insurance Coverage,
  • by Country
  • Language Remains an Obstacle to Health Care for Hispanics

Discrimination

  • Discrimination Seen as Major Problem
  • Table 4-13: Discrimination as a Problem in Schools, the Workplace,
  • and in Preventing Latinos from Succeeding in the United States,
  • by Total Latinos and Primary Language
  • Foreign-Born Latinos See More Discrimination
  • Table 4-14: Discrimination as a Problem in Schools, the Workplace,
  • and in Preventing Latinos from Succeeding in the United States,
  • by Total Latinos, Foreign/Native- Born Latinos, and Age at Immigration
  • to United States among Foreign-Born Latinos
  • Views on Discrimination Vary with Country of Origin
  • Table 4-15: Discrimination as a Problem in Schools, the Workplace, and in Preventing Latinos from Succeeding in the United States, by Country
  • of Origin

Chapter 5: Overview of Hispanic Consumers
Profile of Hispanic Consumer Units

  • Consumer Units Defined
  • Table 5-1: Comparison of Key Indicators of Hispanic Households,
  • Consumer Expenditures Survey vs. Current Population Survey, 2001
  • Hispanics Spend More of Their Reported Income
  • Table 5-2: Expenditures of Hispanic Consumer Units as Percent of
  • Before-Tax Income, 2001
  • Hispanic Consumer Units Show Clear Differences
  • Table 5-3: Characteristics of Consumer Units, Hispanic Consumer Units vs. Other Consumer Units, 2001

Hispanic Consumer Expenditure Patterns

  • Hispanics Outspend Non-Hispanics for Clothing and Footwear
  • Table 5-4: Annual Expenditures for Apparel and Services by Percent of
  • Total Expenditures, Hispanics vs. Other Consumer Units
  • Hispanics Key Consumer Segment for Automakers
  • Table 5-5: Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Consumers for Vehicle
  • Purchases and Related Expenses as Percent of Total Expenditures, 2001
  • Hispanics Biggest Spenders in Food Category
  • Table 5-6: Annual Expenditures by Consumer Units for Food and
  • Beverages, by Amount and as Percent of Total Consumer
  • Expenditures, Hispanics vs. Other Consumer Units, 2001
  • Table 5-7: Annual Expenditures by Consumer Units for Selected Categories
  • of Food at Home, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 2001
  • Hispanic Consumers Buy Home Electronics Equipment
  • Table 5-8: Annual Expenditures by Consumer Units for Entertainment, Hispanics vs. Other Consumer Units 2001
  • Latinos Heavy Spenders on Furniture
  • Table 5-9: Annual Expenditures by Consumer Units for Housekeeping
  • Supplies and Household Furnishings and Equipment, by Amount
  • and as Percent of Total Consumer Expenditures, Hispanics vs. Other Consumer Units, 2001
  • Latinos Spend Less on Health Care
  • Table 5-10: Annual Expenditures for Health Care by Percent of Total Expenditures, Hispanics vs. Other Consumer Units, 2001

Chapter 6: Language, Identity, Culture, and the Hispanic Consumer
Demographic Profile: U.S.- vs. Foreign-Born Hispanics

  • Most Older Hispanics Are Immigrants, Most Younger Hispanics Are U.S.-Born
  • Table 6-1: U.S.-Born vs. Foreign-Born Hispanics by Age Group, 2002
  • Table 6-2: U.S.-Born vs. Foreign-Born Hispanics by Five-Year Age Group, 2002
  • Table 6-3: Percent of U.S.-Born vs. Foreign-Born Hispanics by Age Group, 2002
  • More than Half of Immigrants Came to U.S. after 1990
  • Table 6-4: Foreign-Born Hispanics by Year of Entry, 2002
  • Hispanics Less Likely to Become U.S. Citizens
  • Table 6-5: Citizenship by Hispanic Origin, by Year of Entry, 2002
  • Table 6-6: Foreign-Born Hispanics by Year of Entry, 2002
  • Most Hispanic Population Growth Has Come from Immigration
  • Table 6-7: Components of Population Growth, Hispanics vs. Other
  • Population Groups, April 2000 to July 2002
  • Table 6-8: Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Populations, 1995 vs. 2002
  • But Second Generation Begins to Have Greater Impact
  • Table 6-9: Population Growth of U.S.-Born and Foreign-Born Hispanics, by Age Group, 1995 to 2002
  • Hispanic Births in United States Rise Dramatically
  • Figure 6-1: Hispanic Births, 1989-2002
  • U.S.-Born Hispanics Have More Favorable Economic Profile
  • Table 6-10: Total Money Income of Hispanic Households, Foreign-Born vs. U.S.-Born, 2002
  • Table 6-11: Occupation, Foreign-Born vs. U.S.-Born Hispanics, 2002
  • Table 6-12: Educational Attainment of the Population 25 Years and Over, Foreign-Born vs. U.S.-Born Hispanics, 2002
  • Latino Immigrants Experience More Financial Hardships
  • Table 6-13: Reported Financial Hardships, by Race/Ethnicity and Among Latinos by Foreign/Native-Born and by Primary Language
  • Age at Immigration Drives Income of Foreign-Born Latinos
  • Table 6-14: Income among Foreign-Born Latinos, by Age at Immigration
  • to the United States
  • U.S.-Born Hispanics More Likely To Be Homeowners
  • Table 6-15: Household Tenure by Household Type, Foreign-Born vs.
  • U.S.-Born Hispanics, 2002
  • Table 6-16: Reported Homeownership, by Race/Ethnicity and Among
  • Latinos by Foreign/Native-Born and by Primary Language

The Spanish Language and Hispanics in America

  • Spanish Language Retains Strong Hold
  • Table 6-17: Language Spoken at Home by Hispanics 5 Years of Age and over, 2000
  • Place of Birth Key Factor
  • Table 6-18: Primary Language among Latinos, by Age at Immigration to the United States
  • English-Language Use Correlates with Income and Occupation
  • Table 6-19: Primary Language among Latinos, by Age at Immigration to the United States
  • Young Hispanics Use More English
  • Table 6-20: Bilingual and Native English-speaking Hispanics, by Age Group, 2000
  • Nearly 2.6 Million Hispanic Households Remain “Linguistically Isolated”
  • Table 6-21: Linguistically Isolated Households by Language Spoken, 2002
  • Linguistic Capabilities Vary across Key Hispanic Markets
  • Table 6-22: Linguistically Isolated Hispanic Households in Major Hispanic Markets, 2002

Key Aspects of Hispanic Identity

  • Latino Identity Multifaceted
  • Identity Tied to Language and Generation
  • Table 6-23: The Terms Latinos Choose First or Only to Identify Themselves,
  • by Generation in the United States
  • Table 6-24: The Terms Latinos Choose First or Only to Identify Themselves,
  • by Age at Immigration to the United States among Foreign-Born Latinos
  • Table 6-25: The Terms Latinos Choose First or Only to Identify Themselves,
  • by Primary Language Spoken
  • Latinos Maintain Close Links with Country of Origin
  • Family Ties in Home Country Remain Strong
  • Core Latin American Values Retain Importance
  • Family Remains Central to Latino Life
  • Latinos Believe in the American Dream
  • Political Participation Still Low
  • Table 6-26: Voting Participation in Presidential Elections, 1980-2000
  • Liberal Political Beliefs Balanced by Conservative Social Values

Cultural Identity and Consumer Behavior

  • Latinos Continue to Be Seen as Loyal Consumers
  • Brand Loyalty Starts in Latin America
  • Latino Brand Loyalty Revisited
  • Acculturation Affects Shopping Behavior
  • Table 6-27: Buying Style and Shopping Attitudes of Hispanic Consumers
  • Impact of Acculturation Is Complex
  • Latino Store Selection Analyzed
  • Table 6-28: Hispanic Consumers’ Criteria for Store Selection

Latino Consumers and the Internet

  • Online Latino Population Grows at Above-Average Rate
  • Table 6-29: Growth in Computer Use and Internet Access by Individuals
  • Age 3 and Older, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 1997-2001
  • Studies Detail Profile of Online Latinos

Strategic Implications

  • Demographics Drive Latino Psychographics
  • Hispanic Identity Remains Strong across Generations
  • Demographic Changes Bring New Challenges for Marketers

Chapter 7: Nationality and the Latino Consumer
Overview

  • Census 2000 Did Not Accurately Reflect National Make-up of Latino
  • Population
  • Census Bureau Reconsiders 2000 Data
  • Revised Census Data Paint Different Picture
  • Table 7-1: Hispanics by Subgroup, Original Census 2000 Data vs. Revised Estimates
  • Mexicans Now Account for Two-Thirds of Hispanic Population
  • Table 7-2: Hispanic Population by Hispanic Origin Type, 2002
  • Table 7-3: Hispanic Population Growth by Hispanic Origin Type, 1990 vs. 2002
  • But “New Latinos” Change Hispanic Landscape
  • Table 7-4: Population Growth of Leading Hispanic National Groups, 1990 vs. 2000
  • Immigration Helps Fuel Shifts within Latino Population
  • Table 7-5: Immigration from Latin American Countries, by Region and
  • Country, 1971-1980, 1981-1990, 1991-2001

Race and Latino Identity

  • Latinos Have Different Views of Race
  • Table 7-6: Hispanic Population by Race, 2000
  • Racial Identity Varies by National Origins

Demographic Highlights of Latino National Groups

  • National Groups Show Significant Differences
  • Table 7-7: Demographic Highlights of Hispanic Origin Types, 2002
  • Profiles of National Groups Reveal Diversity
  • Table 7-8: Profiles of Hispanic National Groups

Population Patterns

  • Regional Settlement Patterns Differ
  • Table 7-9: Hispanic Origin Types by Region of Residence, 2002
  • Some Groups More Dispersed than Others
  • Table 7-10: Selected Hispanic National Groups by Leading Metropolitan
  • Areas of Residence, 2000
  • Table 7-11: Immigrants from Selected Latin American Countries and
  • Leading Metropolitan Areas of Intended Residence, 2001
  • Residential Patterns in Metro Areas Differ
  • Table 7-12: Hispanic Origin Types by Location of Residence, Metropolitan
  • vs. Non-Metropolitan, 2002

Language, Identity, and Culture

  • Central Americans Have Most Foreign-Born
  • Table 7-13: Foreign/Native Born among Latinos, by Country of Origin
  • Puerto Ricans Use Spanish the Least
  • Table 7-14: Dominant Language among Latinos, by Country of Origin
  • All Nationalities Agree on Importance of Family
  • Table 7-15: The Importance of Family and Gender Roles among Latinos, by Country of Origin
  • Mexicans and Central Americans Most Conservative Socially
  • Table 7-16: Views on Some Social Issues among Latinos, by Country of Origin

Household and Family Structure

  • Marriage and Divorce Patterns Reflect Social Values
  • Table 7-17: Marital Status of the Hispanic Population 15 Years and Over,
  • by Hispanic Origin Type, 2002
  • Table 7-18: Hispanic One-Person Households by National Origin, 2002
  • Large Family Households Most Common among Mexicans
  • Table 7-19: Household Type by Hispanic Origin Type of Householder, 2002
  • Table 7-20: Family Household Size by Hispanic Origin Type, 2002

Economic Profile

  • Earnings of Workers Vary by National Group
  • Table 7-21: Earnings of Full-Time, Year-Round Workers 15 Years and
  • Over by Hispanic Type, 2001
  • Table 7-22: Full-Time Hispanic Workers Earning $50,000 or More, by Country of Origin, 2001
  • Household Income Levels Show Distinct Patterns
  • Table 7-23: Total Money Income of Households by Hispanic Subgroup, 2001
  • Married-Couple Hispanic Families Fare Best
  • Table 7-24: Total Money Income of Families by Hispanic Subgroup, 2001
  • Cubans Show High Educational Attainment
  • Table 7-25: Educational Attainment of the Population 25 Years and Over, by Hispanic Subgroup, 2002
  • Table 7-26: High-School and College Graduates as a Percent of the
  • Population 25 Years and Over, by Hispanic Subgroup, 2002
  • Occupational Patterns
  • Table 7-27: Occupation of Employed Civilian Males 16 Years and Over, by Hispanic Subgroup, 2002
  • Table 7-28: Occupation of Employed Civilian Females 16 Years and Over, by Hispanic Subgroup, 2002

Strategic Implications

  • Mexicans Major Force in Latino Market
  • But Latino Population Not a Monolith
  • Marketers Pay Heed to National Diversity

Chapter 8: Hispanic Families and Their Kids
Overview of Hispanic Family Structure

  • Family Households More Common among Latinos
  • Table 8-1: Household Type, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 2002
  • Large Families Predominate
  • Table 8-2: Size of Family Households, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 2002
  • Mexicans Account for Most Hispanic Families
  • Table 8-3: Hispanic Family Households by National Origin, 2002

Profile of Hispanic Kids

  • Hispanic Kids Larger Segment of Hispanic Population
  • Table 8-4: Under-18 Population by Selected Age Group, Hispanics vs.
  • Other Population Groups, July 2002
  • Latino Kids Become Increasingly Dominant Force in U.S. Youth Population
  • Table 8-5: Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Populations Under 18 Years of Age, 1990 vs. 2002
  • Table 8-6: Population Growth, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics under 18 Years of Age, 1990 vs. 2002
  • Table 8-7: Hispanics as Percent of Total Population of People under 18 Years of Age, 1990 vs. 2002
  • Most Latino Kids Are U.S.-Born
  • Table 8-8: U.S-Born vs. Foreign-Born Hispanics under 20 Years of Age, 2002
  • English Is Dominant Language among Latino Kids
  • Table 8-9: Bilingual and English-Speaking 5- to 17-Year-Old Hispanics, 2000
  • Three out of Four Hispanic Kids Are Mexican Table 8-10: Hispanic Kids and Teens by National Origin, 2002

The Family Environment of Hispanic Kids

  • Hispanic Kids Have Younger Parents
  • Table 8-11: Age of Parents, Hispanic Children vs. Other Children, 2002
  • Hispanic Kids Have Many Siblings
  • Table 8-12: Presence of Siblings in Families, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 2002
  • Many Latino Kids Share Homes with Grandparents and Other Relatives
  • Table 8-13: Children Living with Grandparents and Other Adults, Hispanics vs. Non- Hispanics, 2002
  • Few Hispanic Kids Have Parents with College Degrees
  • Table 8-14: Education of Parents, Hispanic Children vs. Other Children, 2002
  • Latino Moms More Likely to Stay at Home
  • Table 8-15: Labor Force Status of Parents, Hispanic Children vs. Other Children, 2002
  • Table 8-16: Stay-at-Home Moms in Married-Couple Families with Children under 15, Hispanic Children vs. Other Children, 2002
  • Income Disparities Remain for Hispanic Kids
  • Table 8-17: Income of Families with Children, Hispanic Children vs. Other Children, 2002
  • Table 8-18: Mean Income of Married-Couple Families with Children, Hispanics vs. Non- Hispanics, 2001

The Impact of Acculturation on the Latino Family Environment

  • Kids More Likely to Live with Both Parents If Foreign-Born
  • Table 8-19: Hispanic Children Living with Both Parents, by Nativity of Children and Parents, 2002
  • U.S.-Born Hispanics Have Smaller Families
  • Table 8-20: Presence of Siblings in Hispanic Families, U.S.- vs. Foreign-Born Parents, 2002
  • U.S.-Born Hispanic Moms Less Likely to Stay at Home
  • Table 8-21: Stay-at-Home Moms in Hispanic Married-Couple Families with Children under15, U.S.- vs. Foreign-Born Parents, 2002
  • Kids with U.S.-Born Parents Have Higher Family Incomes
  • Table 8-22: Income of Hispanic Families with Children, U.S.- vs. Foreign-Born Parents, 2002
  • U.S.-Born Parents Have Higher Education Level
  • Table 8-23: Educational Attainment of Parents of Hispanic Children, U.S.- vs. Foreign-Born Parents, 2002
  • More Kids with U.S.-Born Parents Live in Own Homes
  • Table 8-24: Housing Tenure of Hispanic Families with Children, U.S.- vs. Foreign-Born Parents, 2002
  • Foreign-Born Latinos Concerned about Future of Family Ties
  • Table 8-25: Confidence in a Positive Future for Hispanic Children Growing
  • Up in the United States Today, by Foreign/Native-Born Latinos

Consumer Behavior

  • Latinos Shop with Their Families
  • Table 8-26: Hispanic Attitudes toward Shopping as a Social Experience
  • Less Acculturated Parents Indulge Their Kids More
  • Table 8-27: Hispanic Attitudes toward Shopping with Their Kids
  • Kids Have More Influence on Brand Choices of Less Acculturated Parents
  • Less Acculturated Latino Parents Watch More TV with Their Kids
  • Table 8-28: Hispanic Attitudes toward Their Kids and the Media
  • Family Drives Latino Financial Planning

Hispanic Family Expenditures on Their Kids

  • Spending on Latino Kids Significant
  • Food Expenditures Approach $20 Billion
  • Table 8-29: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Families on Food for Their Children, by Age Group, 2002
  • Clothing Expenditures Total $6.7 Billion
  • Table 8-30: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Families on
  • Clothing for Their Children, by Age Group, 2002
  • Spending for Personal Care, Entertainment, and Reading Materials Exceeds $12 Billion
  • Table 8-31: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Families on
  • Personal-Care Items, Entertainment, and Reading Materials for Their Children, by Age Group, 2002
  • Younger Kids Receive Bulk of Spending
  • Table 8-32: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Families on Food, Clothing, Personal-Care Items, Entertainment, and Reading Materials for Their Children, by Age Group, 2002
  • Table 8-33: Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Families on Food, Clothing, Personal-Care Items, Entertainment, and Reading Materials for Their Children, by Percent of Total for Each Age Group, 2002

Strategic Implications

  • Acculturation Has Major Impact on Hispanic Family Structure
  • Retailers Need to View Shopping as Latino Family Event
  • Hispanic Moms Seen as Playing Greater Role in Family Spending
  • Decisions

Chapter 9: The New Latino Generation
Overview

  • More than One in Three Hispanics Are Aged 15 to 34
  • Table 9-1: Population of 15- to 34-Year-Olds by Selected Age Group,
  • Hispanics vs. Other Population Groups, 2002
  • Table 9-2: Population of 15- to 34-Year-Olds, by Race and Hispanic Origin, July 2002
  • Hispanic Youth Register Major Population Gain
  • Table 9-3: 14- to 24-Year-Olds, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic, 1990 Census vs. July 2002 Estimates
  • Table 9-4: Growth of Population of 14- to 24-Year-Olds, by Percent of Total Growth in Selected Age Groups, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 1990 to 2002
  • Educational Profile Mixed
  • Table 9-5: Educational Attainment of 18- to 34-Year-Old Hispanics, 2002
  • Latino Youth and Young Adults Earn Nearly $200 Billion Annually
  • Table 9-6: Earnings of 18- to 24-Year-Old Hispanics by Level of Educational Achievement, 2001
  • Table 9-7: Earnings of 25- to 29-Year-Old Hispanics by Level of Educational Achievement, 2001
  • Table 9-8: Earnings of 30- to 34-Year-Old Hispanics by Level of Educational Achievement, 2001
  • Table 9-9: Earnings of 18- to 34-Year-Old Hispanics by Level of Educational Achievement, 2001
  • Young Hispanic Households Are Major Economic Force
  • Table 9-10: Economic Profile of Households Headed by 15- to 34-Year-Old Hispanics, 2002

Identity and Culture

  • Most Hispanic Youth and Young Adults Are Immigrants
  • Table 9-11: U.S.-Born vs. Foreign-Born 15- to 34-Year-Old Hispanics by Age Group, 2002
  • Age at Immigration Key Factor in Language Usage
  • Table 9-12: Primary Language among Foreign-Born Latinos
  • Latino Urban Youth Prefer English and “Spanglish”
  • Mexicans Predominate
  • Table 9-13: Population of 15- to 34-Year-Olds, by Hispanic Type
  • Lifestyles of Hispanic 20-somethings Show Cultural Differences
  • Table 9-14: Marital Status of 15- to 34-Year-Olds, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites, 2002
  • Table 9-15: Household Structure of 20- to 29-Year-Olds, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites, 2002
  • Table 9-16: Family Arrangements of 20- to 29-Year-Olds, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites, 2002
  • Young Hispanic Men More Likely to Live in Family Setting
  • Table 9-17: Marital Status of 15- to 34-Year-Old Men by Age Group, Hispanics vs. Non- Hispanic Whites, 2002
  • Table 9-18: Household Structure of 20- to 29-Year-Old Men, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites, 2002
  • Table 9-19: Family Arrangements of 20- to 29-Year-Old Men, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites, 2002
  • Young Latino Women Have Larger Families Earlier in Life
  • Table 9-20: Marital Status of 15- to 34-Year-Old Women by Age Group, Hispanics vs. Non- Hispanic Whites, 2002
  • Table 9-21: Distribution of 15- to 34-Year-Old Women, by Number of Children Ever Born, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
  • Table 9-22: Household Structure of 20- to 29-Year-Old Women, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites, 2002
  • Table 9-23: Family Arrangements of 20- to 29-Year-Old Women, Hispanics vs. Non- Hispanic Whites, 2002

Media Usage

  • Less Acculturated Young Adults Depend More on Television
  • Table 9-24: Attitudes toward Television
  • Studies Show Heavy Use of English-Language Media by Latino Youth
  • Media Usage Patterns of Latino Youth Differ
  • Radio Listening Habits Reflect Diverse Tastes
  • New Television Outlets Court New Generation
  • Established Networks Try to Keep Pace

Strategic Implications

  • Young Hispanics Key to Present and Future of Hispanic Market
  • Young Latinos Reflect Family Orientation of Hispanic Culture
  • “Fusion” Market Seen as Important Marketing Target

Chapter 10: Marketing and Advertising Strategies
Overview

  • Hispanic Marketers Think Nationally and Act Locally
  • New Product Development Growing in Importance
  • Community Involvement Key Component

  • Younger Latinos Reached through Music, Celebrities, and Grassroots
  • Marketing
  • Direct Mail More Widely Used
  • Online Marketing Seen as Next Frontier in Hispanic Market

    Examples of Marketing Approaches

    • Blockbuster Targets Hispanics
    • Jim Beam Looks to Hispanic Market
    • Albertsons Opens Stores Dedicated to Hispanic Customers
    • Avon Caters to Hispanic Market
    • Office Depot Reaches Out to Hispanics
    • PepsiCo Adapts to Hispanic Tastes
    • Bank of America Focuses on Hispanic Market
    • Kmart and Sears Compete for Hispanic Market

    Trends in Hispanic Advertising Expenditures

    • Hispanic Ad Budgets Continue Double-Digit Growth
    • Rapid Growth Forecast “Missed Opportunities” Still Seen

    Advertising and the Hispanic Consumer

    • In-Language Advertising Still Seen as Most Effective
    • Hispanics Highly Receptive to Advertising
    • Table 10-1: Hispanic Attitudes toward Advertising
    • Table 10-2: Hispanic Attitudes toward Television Ads
    • Table 10-3: Hispanic Attitudes toward Print Advertising
    • Table 10-4: Hispanic Attitudes toward Outdoor Advertising

    Examples of Advertising Campaigns

    • Procter & Gamble’s Spanish-Language Ad Crosses Over to Mainstream
    • Media
    • Fruit of the Loom Enters Hispanic Market
    • Denny’s Speaks Directly to Hispanic Consumers
    • Automakers Look to Hispanic Market

    Chapter 11: Hispanics and the Media
    Language and Media Usage

    • Hispanics Live in Bilingual Media World
    • Segmentation Key to Media Strategies
    • Survey Research Has Limitations

    Print

    • Magazines Important to Less Acculturated Latinos
    • Table 11-1: Hispanic Attitudes toward Print Media
    • Top Magazines Cited
    • Publishers of Spanish-Language Magazines Look to U.S. Market
    • Leading Spanish-Language Newspapers Listed
    • New Spanish-Language Dailies Launched

    Television and Radio

    • Television Highly Valued by Less Acculturated Latinos
    • Table 11-2: Hispanic Attitudes toward Television
    • Univision/Hispanic Broadcasting Merger Creates First Hispanic Media
    • Giant
    • Univision Remains No. 1
    • NBC’s Telemundo Takes on Rival Univision
    • Azteca Television Wants to Become No. 3
    • Mainstream Cable Plans More Spanish-Language Brand Extensions
    • Cable Operators Seek to Grow Hispanic Market
    • Network TV Looks More to Latinos
    • Radio Prime Source of Entertainment
    • Table 11-3: Hispanic Attitudes toward Radio
    • Hispanic Radio Shows Continuing Growth
    • Hispanic Radio Audience Profiled
    • Regional Mexican Music Is King

    Section 4: The Changing Shape of the Hispanic Market
    Chapter 12: Size and Growth of the Hispanic Market
    Aggregate Consumer Expenditures

    • Consumer Expenditures Topped $330 Billion in 2001
    • Hispanic Spending Grows at Faster Rate
    • Table 12-1: Aggregate Consumer Expenditures, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 1994 vs. 2001
    • Hispanic Food Market Nears $60 Billion
    • Table 12-2: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Consumer Units for Food and Beverages, 2001
    • Household Furnishings Expenditures Total $14 Billion
    • Table 12-3: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Consumer Units for Household Furnishings and Equipment, 2001
    • Apparel Expenditures Exceed $18 Billion
    • Table 12-4: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Consumer Units for Apparel, 2001
    • Consumer Expenditures in Automotive Category Top $68 Billion
    • Table 12-5: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Consumer Units for Vehicle Purchases and Related Expenses, 2001
    • Entertainment Expenditures Total $12 Billion
    • Table 12-6: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Consumer Units for Entertainment, 2001
    • Hispanic Consumers Spend $4.6 Billion on Personal Care
    • Table 12-7: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Consumers for Personal-Care Products and Services, Reading Materials, and Education, 2001

    Hispanic Buying Power

    • Underground Economy a Factor in Hispanic Market
    • Table 12-8: Estimated Unauthorized Resident Immigrant Population from
    • Top Latin American Countries, 1990 vs. 2000
    • Remittances Affect U.S. Latino Buying Power
    • Studies See Exceptional Growth in Hispanic Market
    • Buying Power Used as Measure of Hispanic Market
    • Hispanic Buying Power Will Top $900 Billion in 2008
    • Table 12-9: Projected Growth in Hispanic Buying Power, 2003-2008

    Chapter 13: The New Geography of the Hispanic Market
    Key Geographic Trends

    • Traditional Hispanic Markets Still Important
    • Table 13-1: Metropolitan Areas with Largest Hispanic Populations, 2000
    • But Latino Migration Begins to Change Landscape
    • Table 13-2: Migration of Foreign-Born Hispanic Population within the United States, 1995 to2000
    • Table 13-3: Interstate and Foreign Moves by Foreign-Born Population, by Region of Birth,1995 to 2000
    • Gateway States Lose Ground
    • Table 13-4: States with Largest Gains from Interstate Migration by Foreign-Born Population, 1995 to 2000
    • Southern States Continue to Show Fastest Growth
    • Table 13-5: States with Fastest-Growing Hispanic Populations, April 2000-July 2002
    • Fastest-Growing Metro Markets Lie outside Traditional Hispanic Areas
    • Mexican Immigration and Domestic Migration Changes Latino Profile in
    • Key Metro Areas
    • Rural Heartland Affected by Latino Migration
    • Hispanic Migration Helps Create “New Brooklyns” in Metro Areas

    Strategic Implications

    • Latino Market More Localized
    • Bottom Lines Now Affected in More Localities

    Chapter 14: Trends and Opportunities—Present and Future
    Current Trends and Opportunities

    • Hispanic Market No Longer an Opportunity but a Necessity
    • Increasing Segmentation Likely in Future
    • “Hispanic” Won’t Necessarily Mean “Spanish”
    • Retro-Acculturation Seen Emerging
    • Generational Identity May Trump National Origins
    • Upward Mobility Drives Hispanic Market
    • Number of Affluent Hispanics Increases
    • More Undocumented Mexicans Join Mainstream Economy
    • Wide Range of Industries See Possibilities in Hispanic Market

    Appendix: Addresses of Selected U.S. Hispanic Market Resources

    • Advertising/Marketing
    • Market Research
    • Publications

  • Other Media