The U.S. Market for Cultured Dairy Products: Yogurt, Sour Cream, Cream Cheese and Related Products

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Published Feb 1, 2005 | 250 Pages | Pub ID: LA1058315

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The refrigerated cultured dairy products category is poised for unprecedented growth as a result of a variety of marketplace factors. These include dairy’s healthful halo and the explosive growth in the Hispanic population, an ethnic segment that views cultured dairy products as staples in their daily diet and in meal preparation. With 2004 retail sales in the neighborhood of $8 billion, cultured dairy categories such as drinkable yogurt, probiotic shots, dips, and cream cheese-style spreads are driving growth.

This new report from Packaged Facts, The U.S. Market for Cultured Dairy Products: Yogurts, Cream Cheese, Sour Cream and Related Products, provides details on the latest and greatest in cultured dairy foods, including new technologies and innovations such as lower-carbohydrate formulations and good-for-you bacteria. You will find profiles of the top retail players, along with comprehensive demographic data and brand share information. This report is a must resource for anyone involved in the cultured dairy products, or anyone thinking of entering it

Yogurt sold in multi-packs and individual cups, as well as squeeze tubes for spoon-free eating, are also showing impressive growth thanks to better-for-you and demographic-focused formulations. This includes the addition of probiotic bacteria, fiber, vitamins, minerals, and other healthful ingredients, along with flavors and colors that appeal to kids, adults, and aging baby boomers. Though branded cultured products are typically sold through retail venues, single-serving containers are gaining distribution through foodservice outlets. This presents an opportunity for marketers familiar with selling cultured product such as cottage cheese, cream cheese, and sour cream in bulk to foodservice establishments such as restaurants and cafeterias.

And, like many industries, marketer consolidation is making the big players bigger, and the smaller players smaller. Bigger means more marketing dollars and a greater chance of success. Smaller translates to a greater chance of failure as a result of fewer resources; however, in the cultured dairy segment, smaller also means more willingness to be creative and take risks when it comes to innovation.

Report Methodology
The information in The U.S. Market for Cultured Dairy Products: Yogurts, Cream Cheese and Sour Cream and Related Products is based on both primary and secondary research. Primary research involved on-site examination of the retail milieu, interviews with marketing, public relations and industry analysts within the dairy market and consultants to the industry. Secondary research entailed data-gathering from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature. Packaged Facts has derived mass merchandiser sales figures from Information Resources, Inc. (IRI) InfoScan sales-tracking data. Figures provided on national consumer advertising expenditures are based primarily on data compiled by CMR/TNS Media Intelligence U.S., the leading provider of strategic advertising and marketing communications intelligence. The analysis of consumer demographics derives from Simmons Market Research Bureau survey data for spring 2004. New product information is gathered via literature research, personal interviews and data compiled by ProductScan, a service of Marketing Intelligence Service Ltd.

The report looks at every segment of the cultured dairy products market, examining trends for growth and projecting sales of products through 2009. It analyzes consumer demographics and their current and projected impact on sales of yogurt, yogurt drinks, sour cream, cottage cheese and related products. It provides up-to-date competitive profiles of marketers of cultured dairy products and discusses the influence of demographic trends as a driver of retail trends. The report also spotlights new products and current distribution trends, and offers readers trends and marketing opportunities within the food/beverage industry.

What You’ll Get in this Report
The U.S. Market for Cultured Dairy Products makes important predictions and recommendations regarding the future of this market, and pinpoints ways current and prospective marketers can capitalize on current trends and spearhead new ones. No other market research report provides both the comprehensive analysis and extensive data that The U.S. Market for Cultured Dairy Products offers. The report addresses the following segments:

  • The Market (including market size and composition, and projected market growth)
  • The Marketers (including discussions of specific marketer brand and market shares)
  • Competitive Profiles (of the mainstream marketers, specialists and up-and-coming niche players, and analyses of the products they market)
  • Distribution Strategies
  • The Consumer (who’s buying what, and where)
  • The Products
  • Trends and Opportunities

Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

Scroll down to see a more detailed outline of the contents of this report.

How You Will Benefit from this Report
If your company is already competing in the cultured dairy products market, or is considering making the leap, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current market for cultured dairy foods and beverages, as well as projected sales and trends through 2009. Contributing to that understanding will be a complete analysis of sales data from IRI and other published and trade sources, a detailed discussion of the consumer for yogurt, yogurt drinks, sour cream, cottage cheese and related products based on Simmons data.

This report will help:

  • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for cultured dairy products.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for cultured dairy products.
  • Advertising agencies working with clients in the food and beverage industries understand the product buyer to develop messages and images that compel consumers to purchase these products.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.

Chapter 1 Executive Summary
  • Scope and Methodology
  • Market Parameters
  • Report Methodology

  • The Products
    • Three Primary Categories
    • First Category: Cultured Fluid
    • Second Category: Non-Drinkable Yogurt
    • Third Category: Other Non-Pourable Cultured Dairy
    • Retail Packaging Dynamics
    • Foodservice Sizes and Offerings

  • Size and Growth of the Market
    • 2004 Sales Are Almost at $6.0 Billion
    • Sales Approach $11.4 Billion by 2009
    • Table 1-1
    • U.S. Sales of Cultured Dairy Products, 2000-2009 (in millions of dollars)
    • Market Share by Product Category
    • Table 1-2
    • U.S. Sales of Cultured Dairy Products by Primary Category, 2004 (in thousands of dollars)
    • Projected Category Growth Strongest for Cultured Fluid Products
    • Table 1-3
    • U.S. Sales of Cultured Dairy Products by Primary Category, 2009 (in thousands of dollars)

  • Factors Affecting Market Growth
  • The Marketers
    • All Types of Marketers
    • Leading Marketers

  • Distribution and Sales Outlets
    • Distribution Methods
    • Acquisitions Result in Enhanced Distribution Efforts
    • The Consumer
    • Kids, Hispanics Driving Factors
    • Consumer Trends Support Continued Growth in Organics
    • Does the Low-Carb Consumer Still Exist?

    Chapter 2 The Products

    • Key Points
    • Scope of the Report
    • Products Outside of Scope
    • Product Breakouts: Three Primary Categories
    • First Category: Cultured Fluid
    • Second Category: Non-Drinkable Yogurt
    • Third Category: Other Non-Pourable Cultured Dairy
    • Yogurt Production on the Rise
    • Table 2-1 U.S. Yogurt Production, 1990-2003
    • Refrigeration Required
    • Retail Packaging Dynamics
    • Foodservice Sizes and Offerings
    • Other Descriptors
    • Table 2-2 Legal Descriptors for Fat and Calorie Contents
    • Low-Carb Trend Slows, Counting Calories Picks Up Pace
    • Fiber’s Place in the Big Picture
    • Government Regulations and The Regulatory Environment
      • Understanding Price Supports
      • If Those Are Orders, Then What’s a Compact
      • Dairy Compacts Remain Non-Existent
      • 2004—Policy Reform Progress
      • Labeling Overview
      • Standards of Identity
      • Table 2-3 U.S. Standards for Select Cultured Dairy Products
      • Changing Culture Content Requirements
      • Live and Active Culture Seal
      • Labeling Nomenclature
      • Low-Carb Is Not a Legal Descriptor . . . Yet
      • Provide the Facts: Nutritional Information Musts
      • Trans Fats Are a New Addition
      • Products That Are Exempt
      • Nutrition Regulations in Foodservice
      • A Variety of Possible Claims
      • Types of Health Claims
      • Health Claims That Meet Significant Scientific Agreement
      • Qualified Health Claims
      • Structure/Function and Dietary Guidance Claims
      • Nutrient Content Claims
      • Allergen Issues
      • Are You Prepared for a Product Recall?
      • Table 2-4 A Sampling of Recalls, 2000-2004

    Chapter 3 The Market

    • Key Points

  • Market Size and Growth
    • 2004 Retail Sales for Total Market Almost $6 Billion
    • Table 3-1: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cultured Dairy Products, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Figure 3-1: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cultured Dairy Products, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Market Larger for Single-Serve Products Because of Foodservice Sales
    • Other Cultured Dairy Foodservice Sales
    • Non-Drinkable Yogurt Leads Market
    • Table 3-2: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cultured Dairy Products by Primary Category, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Drinkable Yogurt/Yogurt Smoothies Driving Cultured Fluid Category
    • Table 3-3: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cultured Fluid by Sub-Categories, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Single Yogurt Cups Remain the Largest Sub-Category
    • Table 3-4: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Non-Drinkable Yogurt by Sub-Categories, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Other Non-Pourable Cultured Products Are a Relatively Small Business
    • Table 3-5: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Other Non-Pourable Cultured by Sub-Categories, 2000-2004 (in thousands of dollars)
    • Cream Cheese Sales Almost Split Between Brick and Spreadable
    • Table 3-6: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cream Cheese by Sub-Categories, 2000-2004

  • Market Composition
    • Drinkable Yogurt/Yogurt Smoothies Drive Share Growth
    • Figure 3-2: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cultured Dairy Products: Share of Dollar Sales by Primary Category, 2004 (percent)
    • When All Sub-Categories Are Compared, There’s Not Much to Compare
    • Figure 3-3: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cultured Dairy Products: Share of Dollar Sales by All Sub-Categories, 2004 (percent)
    • Other Cultured Fluid Share Expected to Continue to Decrease
    • Figure 3-4: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cultured Fluid: Share of Dollar Sales by Sub-Categories, 2004 (percent)
    • Single Yogurt Cups Claim Three-Fourths of Non-Drinkable Yogurt Sales
    • Figure 3-5: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Non-Drinkable Yogurt: Share of Dollar Sales by Sub-Categories, 2004 (percent)
    • Organic Labeling Is Only Noteworthy in Yogurt Products
    • Figure 3-6: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Drinkable Yogurt/Yogurt Smoothies and Non-Drinkable Yogurt: Share of Dollar Sales by Organic Labeling, 2004 (percent)
    • Low-Fat Non-Drinkable Yogurt Is More Than Half of Category
    • Figure 3-7: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Non-Drinkable Yogurt: Share of Dollar Sales by Fat Content, 2004 (percent)
    • Cottage Cheese Has Greatest Share in Other Non-Pourable Category
    • Figure 3-8: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Other Non-Pourable Cultured: Share of Dollar Sales by Sub-Categories, 2004 (percent)
    • Figure 3-9: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cottage Cheese: Share of Dollar Sales by Package Size, 2004 (percent)
    • Nonfat Cottage Cheese Remains a Small Part of the Category
    • Figure 3-10: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cottage Cheese: Share of Dollar Sales by Fat Content, 2004 (percent)
    • Cream Cheese Almost Cut Down the Middle Between Forms
    • Figure 3-11: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cream Cheese: Share of Dollar Sales by Form, 2004 (percent)
    • With So Many Flavors, What Flavors Are Most Popular?
    • Figure 3-12: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cream Cheese: Share of Dollar Sales by Presence of Flavor, 2004 (percent)
    • Figure 3-13: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Flavored Cream Cheese: Share of Dollar Sales by Flavor, 2004 (percent)
    • Cream Cheese Users Want Fat
    • Figure 3-14: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cream Cheese: Share of Dollar Sales by Fat Content, 2004 (percent)
    • Sour Cream Users Also Want Fat
    • Figure 3-15: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Sour Cream: Share of Dollar Sales by Package Size, 2004 (percent)
    • Figure 3-16: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Sour Cream: Share of Dollar Sales by Fat Content, 2004 (percent)
    • Private Label Is Popular Only With Certain Cultured Dairy Products
    • Figure 3-17: Total U.S. Retail Sales of All Non-Drinkable Yogurt, Branded vs. Private Label: Share of Dollar Sales, 2004 (percent)
    • Other Non-Pourable Cultured Dairy Private Label Varies
    • Figure 3-18: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cottage Cheese, Branded vs. Private Label: Share of Dollar Sales, 2004 (percent)
    • Figure 3-19: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cream Cheese, Branded vs. Private Label: Share of Dollar Sales, 2004 (percent)
    • Dairy Dips Are More of a Branded Business
    • Figure 3-20: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Dairy Dips, Branded vs. Private Label: Share of Dollar Sales, 2004 (percent)
    • Figure 3-21: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Sour Cream, Branded vs. Private Label: Share of Dollar Sales, 2004 (percent)
    • Traditional Supermarkets Are the Primary Retail Sales Venue
    • Figure 3-22: Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cultured Dairy Products: Share of Dollar Sales by Retailer Type, 2004 (percent)
    • Regional Preferences by Product Type
    • Table 3-7 Regional Distribution Indices for Consumption of Cultured Dairy Products by Product Type, 2004: (U.S. adults)

  • Factors to Market Growth
    • Dairy’s Reputation at an All-Time High
    • Others Support Consuming More Dairy
    • 3-A-Day Programs Drives Consumers to Eating More Yogurt
    • Dairy and Weight Loss Connection
    • Licensing the Dairy and Weight Loss Connection Claim
    • A Coo for Cultured Dairy Regarding Splenda Formulations
    • Cultured Dairy Naturally Has that Healthful Halo
    • Globalization of Culture
    • Projected Market Growth
    • Sales to Approach $11.4 Billion by 2009
    • Table 3-8 Projected Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cultured Dairy Products, 2004-2009 (in millions of dollars)
    • Figure 3-23 Projected Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cultured Dairy Products, 2004-2009 (in millions of dollars)
    • Probiotic Shots Will Experience Greatest Growth
    • Table 3-9 Projected Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cultured Dairy Products by Primary Category, 2004-2009 (in thousands of dollars)
    • Table 3-10 Projected Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cultured Fluid by Sub-Categories, 2004-2009 (in thousands of dollars)
    • Non-Pourable Yogurt Sales Steady and Strong
    • Table 3-11 Projected Total U.S. Retail Sales of Non-Drinkable Yogurt by Sub-Categories, 2004-2009: (in thousands of dollars)
    • All Other Non-Pourable Cultured Dairy Shows Steady Growth
    • Table 3-12: Projected Total U.S. Retail Sales of Other Non-Pourable Cultured Dairy by Sub-Categories, 2004-2009 (in thousands of dollars)
    • Table 3-13: Projected Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cream Cheese by Sub-Categories, 2004-2009: (in thousands of dollars)

    Chapter 4 The Marketers

    • Key Points
    • Marketer Diversity
      • All Types of Marketers
      • Table 4-1: U.S. Cultured Dairy Products: Select Marketers by Primary Brand and Product Lines, 2005
      • National Leaders Are Growing in Number
      • Regional and Local Marketers Have Strong Following
      • The Long Journey to the New HP Hood
      • With Kraft’s Yogurt Divesture Comes a New Marketer
      • Not Too Much More News Among the Big Guys
      • What Marketers Are Doing to Raise Probiotic Awareness
      • National Players in Natural and Organic Yogurt Emerge

    • Competitive Retail Overview
      • The Retail Cultured Dairy Products Marketplace
      • Overview of Retail Marketers
      • General Mills Is Number-One in Yogurt, Dannon Is a Close Second
      • Table 4-2: Total U.S. Mainstream Retail Sales of All Yogurt Products (Drinkable Yogurt/Yogurt Smoothies, Single Yogurt Cups, Multi-Pack Yogurt Cups, and Yogurt Tubes): Dollar Sales for the Top-10 Marketers, 2004 (in millions)
      • Dannon Leads in Drinkables
      • Table 4-3: Total U.S. Mainstream Retail Sales of Drinkable Yogurt/Yogurt Smoothies: Dollar Sales for the Top-10 Brands, 2004 (in millions)
      • But When It Comes to Cups, the Yoplait Brand Rules
      • Table 4-4: Total U.S. Mainstream Retail Sales of All Cup Yogurts (Single and Multi-Packs): Dollar Sales for the Top-20 Brands, 2004 (in millions)
      • With Yogurt Tubes, There’s Really Only One Player
      • Kefir, Too, Is Almost a Single Marketer Category
      • Kraft Rules Cottage Cheese and Cream Cheese
      • Table 4-5: Total U.S. Mainstream Retail Sales of Cottage Cheese Products: Dollar Sales for the Top-10 Marketers, 2004 (in millions)
      • Table 4-6: Total U.S. Mainstream Retail Sales of Cottage Cheese: Dollar Sales for the Top-20 Brands, 2004 (in millions)
      • The Leader in Dairy Dips Is Confusing
      • Table 4-7: Total U.S. Mainstream Retail Sales of Dairy Dips: Dollar Sales for the Top-10 Marketers, 2004 (in millions)
      • Table 4-8: Total U.S. Mainstream Retail Sales of Dairy Dips: Dollar Sales for the Top-10 Brands, 2004 (in millions)
      • With Sour Cream, Dean Rules as Marketer Because of Its Many Brands
      • Table 4-9: Total U.S. Mainstream Retail Sales of Sour Cream: Dollar Sales for the Top-10 Marketers, 2004 (in millions)
      • Table 4-10: Total U.S. Mainstream Retail Sales of Sour Cream: Dollar Sales for the Top-10 Brands, 2004 (in millions)

    • Competitive Profile: Anderson Erickson Dairy Co., Des Moines, Iowa
      • Company Overview
      • A Growing List of First for AE
      • So Far, the One and Only
      • Making Yogurt Taste Great a Goal From the Start
      • AE’s Weekly Taste Tests
      • Unique Products From a Unique Company
      • AE’s Cottage Cheese—Another One-of-its-Kind
      • A Look Inside the Company’s Crystal Ball

    • Competitive Profile: CoolBrands International, Inc., Ronkonkoma, New York
    • Company Overview
      • The Yogurt Acquisition
      • Other Food-Related Businesses
      • So Many Acquisitions in So Little Time
      • And a New Distribution Deal
      • The Tropicana Relationship
      • Growing Its Better-For-You Business
      • A Whole New Category: Frozen Yogurt for Breakfast
      • Refrigerated and Frozen Synergies?

    • Competitive Profile: The Dannon Co., Inc., White Plains, New York
      • Company Overview
      • Daniel Brings Dannon to America
      • Returning to France Brings Changes to U.S. Business
      • Dannon Returns to Groupe Danone
      • Dannon Launches “News You Can Use” About Probiotics
      • The Dannon-Stonyfield Connection
      • New Products for Dannon Are Plentiful
      • Danimals Expands Kid Reach
      • And, of Course, Something for Carb Counters

    • Competitive Profile: Dean Foods Co., Dallas, Texas
      • Company Overview
      • Structure of the Company
      • More Reorganizing in Early 2005
      • 2004 Acquisition of Horizon Builds Organic Cultured Business
      • A Bit About Horizon
      • Appealing to Younger Consumers
      • Dean Foods’ Extensive Line of Cultured Dairy Brands
      • Innovations From Mountain High Something Special For Babies
      • Out West, Cultured Products Can Be Purchased at Drive-Thru Dairies
      • Oak Farms Dairy Expands Relationship with Hispanic Consumers

    • Competitive Profile: General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota
      • Company Overview
      • A Smoothie Designed For Women for Breakfast
      • Yoplait Helps Consumers Meet Vitamin D Needs
      • Of Course, Something for the Carb-Conscious
      • New for 2005, Heart Healthy Yogurt
      • Always Committed to Women’s Issues
      • And Committed to Shaping Up America

    • Competitive Profile: HP Hood LLC, Chelsea, Massachusetts
      • Company Overview
      • HP Hood LLC Forms in 2004
      • Hood Buys LeCarb Brand From Low-Carb Forerunners
      • Counting Down the Carbs with Atkins
      • Growing Flavored Cottage Cheese Business
      • One Heluva a Dip
      • Hood Still Home Delivers

    • Competitive Profile: Kraft Foods Inc., Northfield, Illinois
      • Company Overview
      • The World’s Number-One Brand of Cream Cheese
      • Kraft Makes Sam Breakstone Proud
      • Kraft Wants Out of Yogurt

    • Competitive Profile: Stonyfield Farm, Londonderry, New Hampshire
      • Company Overview
      • Strong Beliefs in Yogurt’s Benefits and the Environment
      • Deciding to Spend on Advertising
      • Innovations-a-Plenty
      • Stonyfield Introduces Healthy Vending Machines to Schools
      • A Bit on Brown Cow

    • Competitive Profile: Wells’ Dairy, Inc., LeMars, Iowa
      • Company Overview
      • State-of-the-Art Facilities
      • Co-Packing is Big Business for Wells’ Dairy
      • Wells’ Stays in Iowa Thanks to Fast-Passed Bill
      • Freedom for the Carbohydrate-Conscious
    < Chapter 5 Distribution and Sales
    • Key Points
    • Distribution Overview
      • Distribution Methods
      • Direct Delivery Advantages
      • The Cost of Face-To-Face Business
      • Advantages of Warehouse Delivery
      • Acquisitions Result in Enhanced Distribution Efforts
      • Technologies for Refrigerated Fleets
      • Computerizing Distribution for Dairies
      • Wells’ Dairy Bolsters Market Leadership with Data New System
      • Helping the Trucks Help the Driver Be More Efficient

    • Retail Overview
      • For This Chapter, All Retail Venues Have Been Analyzed
      • Traditional Supermarkets Account for 71.2% of Retail Sales
      • Dairy Is Big Business for Natural Foods Stores
      • Figure 5-1 Total U.S. Retail Sales of Cultured Dairy Products: Share of Dollar Sales by Retailer Type, 2004 (percent)
      • Regional Receiving Product
      • Milk Crates Are an Enemy on the Way Out
      • Club Stores Require Special Secondary Packaging, Too
      • Some Cultured Products Generate Higher Activity-Based Costs
      • Drink Placement: Dairy Case vs. Beverage Cooler
      • Secondary Merchandising Creates Incremental Growth
      • Typical Cultured Dairy Product Placement
      • Supermarket Retail Prices Can Vary Significantly Product and Brand
      • Table 5-1 U.S. Cultured Dairy Products: Suggested Supermarket Retail Price of Cultured Fluid Products, 2004
      • Table 5-2 U.S. Cultured Dairy Products: Suggested Supermarket Retail Price of Non-Drinkable Yogurt, 2004
      • Table 5-3 U.S. Cultured Dairy Products: Suggested Supermarket Retail Price of Other Non-Pourable Cultured Dairy, 2004
      • Natural Foods Stores Are an Organic Dairy Destination
      • Table 5-4 U.S. Cultured Dairy Products: Suggested Natural Foods Store Price of Selected Products, 2004
      • The Increasingly Popular Club Store
      • Membership Benefits
      • Multi-Packs and Family-Size Products
      • Table 5-5 U.S. Cultured Dairy Products: Suggested Club Store Price of Selected Products, 2004
      • Private Label Pricing
      • Table 5-6 U.S. Cultured Dairy Products: Private Label vs. Branded Retail Price of Drinkable Yogurt/Yogurt Smoothies, 2004
      • Table 5-7 U.S. Cultured Dairy Products: Private Label vs. Branded Retail Price of Buttermilk, 2004
      • Table 5-8 U.S. Cultured Dairy Products: Private Label vs. Branded Retail Price of Single Yogurt Cups, 2004
      • Table 5-9 U.S. Cultured Dairy Products: Private Label vs. Branded Retail Price of Multi-Packs of Yogurt Tubes, 2004
      • Table 5-10 U.S. Cultured Dairy Products: Private Label vs. Branded Retail Price of Cottage Cheese, 2004
      • Table 5-11 U.S. Cultured Dairy Products: Private Label vs. Branded Retail Price of Cream Cheese Brick, 2004
      • Table 5-12 U.S. Cultured Dairy Products: Private Label vs. Branded Retail Price of Dairy Dips, 2004
      • Home Delivery Is Sometimes an Option

    • Foodservice Overview
      • Cultured Dairy Products Sold Three Different Ways
      • All Mexican Restaurants Are Big Users of Bulk Sour Cream
      • Vended Yogurt Products Are Increasing in Popularity
      • Stonyfield Introduces Healthy Vending Machines to Schools
    < Chapter 6 The Consumer
    • Key Points
    • Consumer Attitudes and Use
      • Traditional Supermarkets No Longer Primary Store
      • Shopper Differences
      • The Role of Convenience and Nutrition
      • Focusing on Obesity, which Includes Type-Two Diabetes
      • Today’s Nutrition Savvy Consumer
      • Consumers Are in an Overall Wellness Revolution
      • So Who Is the Organic Consumer?
      • 24% of Organic Shoppers Buy Organic Dairy Foods
      • Table 6-1 Categories of Organic Foods Purchases by Those
      • Who Buy Organic
      • Dairy Has About 13% Dollar Share of Organic Foods and Beverages
      • Table 6-2 Category Share by Percent of Market (Consumer Food Sales)
      • But Do Consumers Really Know What Organic Means?
      • Table 6-3 Consumer Responses About Requirements for Foods to Be Called Organic
      • Organic Users Show Greater Understanding
      • Figure 6-1 Percent of Consumers Agreeing “Completely/Somewhat” That Organic Foods and Beverages
      • Organic Industry Must Educate Consumers
      • 31% of Shoppers Attentive to Organic Seal
      • Organic Foods Perceived as Healthier
      • Table 6-4 Reasons Why Consumers Choose Organic
      • Foods and Beverages
      • 60% of Shoppers Feel Organic Foods Are Healthier
      • Another Survey Confirms Perspective that Organic Is Healthier
      • Table 6-5 Percent of Consumers Who Agree Organic/Natural Food
      • Is Beneficial
      • Education Levels Higher for Organic Shoppers
      • As Market Grows, Consumer Profile Changes
      • Ethnic Diversity Among Organic Shoppers
      • Frequency of Use Increasing
      • Demographics of Organic Users and Non-Users
      • Table 6-6 Percent of Adult Consumers Who Use or Do Use Organic Foods and Beverages
      • Opportunities with the Hispanic Consumer
      • Where Do Hispanics Concentrate in the States?
      • Figure 6-2: Regional Distribution of U.S. Hispanic Population
      • Hispanic Shopping Trends
      • Dairy Is Big with Hispanics

    • Connecting with Consumers
      • How Different Variables Influence Purchase of New Products
      • Communicating the Benefits of Functional Foods

    • Consumer Demographics
    • U.S. Per Capita Sales Up for Most Cultured Dairy
      • Figure 6-3: U.S. Per Capita Sales of Select Cultured Dairy Products, 2002
      • U.S. Per Capita Sales Trends
      • Table 6-7: U.S. Per Capita Consumption of Select Cultured Dairy Products, 1980-2003 (pounds per person)
      • Simmons Consumer Survey
      • Simmons Data on Cultured Dairy Products
      • Table 6-8: Percent of Adult Consumers Who Use Cultured Dair8 Products by Type and Brand, May 2003-April 2004 (U.S. Households)
      • Product Purchasing Patterns
      • Patterns by Age Bracket
      • The Gender Skew
      • Patterns by Race/Ethnicity
      • Patterns by Household Income
      • Patterns by Household Size and Presence of Children
      • Table 6-9: Indices for Use of Select Cultured Dairy Products and Brands by Adult Age Bracket (in Years Old), May 2003-April 2004 (U.S. Households)
      • Table 6-10: Indices for Use of Select Cultured Dairy Products and Brands by Gender and Race, May 2003-April 2004 (U.S. Households)
      • Table 6-11: Indices for Use of Select Cultured Dairy Products and Brands by Household Income (in thousands), May 2003-April 2004 (U.S. Households)
      • Table 6-12: Indices for Use of Select Cultured Dairy Products and Brands by Household Size and Marital Status, May 2003-April 2004 (U.S. Households)
      • Table 6-13: Indices for Use of Select Cultured Dairy Products and Brands by Age of Children in Household (in Years Old), May 2003-April 2004 (U.S. Households)
      • Demographics Favoring Use of Selected Categories and Brands
      • Table 6-14: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Purchase of Drinkable Yogurt and Buttermilk, May 2003-April 2004 (U.S. Households)
      • Table 6-15: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Purchase of Yogurt by Formulation, May 2003-April 2004 (U.S. Households)
      • Cottage Cheese Users Tend to be Older
      • Table 6-16: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Purchase of Cottage Cheese by Formulation, May 2003-April 2004 (U.S. Households)
      • Table 6-17: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Purchase of Cream Cheese by Formulation, May 2003-April 2004 (U.S. Households)
      • Dips Are Universally Liked by Americans
      • Table 6-18: Demographic Characteristics Favoring Purchase of Dips and Sour Cream by Formulation, May 2003-April 2004 (U.S. Households)
    < Chapter 7 New Product Trends
    • Key Points

  • Product Trends
    • Yogurt—In All Its Forms—Is Where the Excitement Is
    • Moving Forward in Cultured Dairy
    • Yogurt Beverages Are Just What Parents Ordered
    • Probiotics: A Trend on the Verge of an Explosion
    • With Probiotics, One Often Finds Prebiotics
    • The Time Is Right for Probiotic Shots
    • Probiotics in Other Cultured Dairy Products, Too
    • Other Cultured Dairy Innovations Focus on Flavor
    • Creating Kick and Pitching New Uses
    • No BST—A Niche, But One Some Commit to Provide
    • Organic Dairy a Much Bigger Niche, With Many More Users
    • Consumer Trends Support Continued Growth in Organics
    • Yogurt Can Be So Much for So Many
    • New Dietary Guidelines Will Influence Product Development Trends
    • Foodservice Is Seeing More Cultured Innovation, Too
    • Advancements in Technology Further Enhancing Healthful Halo
    • Low-Carb Enters the Scene. Will It Stay?
    • Adding Other Stuff for Health
    • Hispanic Population Is Driving Innovation in Flavor
    • Limited Edition Flavors
    • The World Is Shrinking
    • Global Product Development Trends

  • New Product Introductions
    • Introductions Have Been Plentiful
    • Table 7-1
    • U.S. Cultured Dairy Products: Select New Cultured Fluid Items by Marketer, Brand, and Description, 2003-2005
    • Table 7-2: U.S. Cultured Dairy Products
    • Select New Non-Drinkable Yogurt Items by Marketer, Brand, and Description, 2003-2005
    • Table 7-3: U.S. Cultured Dairy Products
    • Select New Other Non-Pourable Cultured Dairy Items by Marketer, Brand, and Description, 2003-2005
    < Appendix Addresses of Selected Marketers