Baby Boomers in the U.S.

 
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Published May 1, 2006 | 340 Pages | Pub ID: LA1190036

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As the first wave of Baby Boomers turn age 60 in 2006, Packaged Facts presents an all-new report on the attitudes, preferences, and shopping behaviors of this cohort across a wide range of U.S. markets. Born between the years 1946 and 1964, this diverse, individualistic, and demanding generation accounts for nearly one in three Americans today, and their insistence on maintaining youthful, active lives far into the future provides a clear opportunity for marketers to “age up” their products and services to suit the evolving needs of these affluent architects of American Youth Culture.

Drawing on uniquely cross-tabulated Simmons Market Research Bureau survey data, along with government and private sector data sources, this report explores the many drivers of Boomer behavior, with a particular focus on the responsibilities occasioned by life stages such as parent- and grandparenthood, divorce and remarriage, empty nests, and retirement or semi-retirement. The report describes emerging Boomer-centric marketing campaigns and suggests how marketers can respond to and anticipate preferences and behaviors across industries. Extensive analysis of consumer survey data, in combination with wide-ranging qualitative market analysis, provide a comprehensive outlook on how this economically and socially powerful cohort will continue to redefine attitudes about everything from personal style to professional know-how far into the 21st century.

Following an overview of Boomer attitudes and spending trends are seven focus chapters covering the following market categories:

  • Boomer Demographics, an evaluation of life stages, ethnicity, gender, education, employment, income, and how these traits contribute to Boomers’ perceptions of youth and aging.
  • Boomer Lifestyles, an exploration of the cyclical nature of the interests, career goals, relationships, and life choices of people age 40-59; their demand for products and services that facilitate their active, youthful approach to life.
  • Boomer Diet and Health, an analysis of the growing awareness that diet, exercise, and self-monitoring of indicators such as cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood sugar are vital to maintain long-term health and keep insurance costs down; a look at wellness trends such as natural products, yoga, and alternative medicines.
  • Boomers and Internet Technology, a review of the widespread impact of Internet and related technologies on virtually every aspect of boomers’ daily lives, from personal relationships and employment to shopping, health, finances, and entertainment; relevance and attitudes toward text, voice, information applications, and emerging technologies.
  • Boomers and Home Buying, a breakdown of traits and attitudes regarding home ownership and the home-buying and renovation options boomers consider as they plot out the next 30 years; condos, single-family homes, retirement communities, vacation and second homes, and timeshares are explored.
  • Boomers, Transportation, and Travel, an examination of preferences regarding automobile purchase, including safety, style, and other features; a look at increasingly experience-oriented travel and vacations for individuals, couples, and families.
  • Boomers and Personal Finance, a survey of the varied financial situations and categories among boomers, including retirement savings, investments, health and long-term care insurance, and awareness of and opinions about financial planning products and services.

Report Methodology
The information in Baby Boomers is based on both primary and secondary research. Primary research involved interviews with experts, public relations and industry analysts in firms that specialize in boomer market research. The report features unique analysis based on the Simmons Market Research Bureau Fall 2005 National Consumer Survey. Secondary research entailed data-gathering from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature.

How You Will Benefit from this Report
If your company is interested in understanding and reaching the boomer market, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight about Baby Boomers not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current demographic profile of the boomer population. Contributing to that understanding will be a complete analysis of data from published and trade sources, and in-depth examinations of the economic and societal trends that influence the consumer behaviors of this large and influential segment of the population. Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

This report will help:

  • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for products of interest to boomers.
  • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for products targeting the Baby Boomer population.
  • Advertising agencies to develop messages and images that compel kids (or their parents) to purchase these products.
  • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
  • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.

Chapter 1: Executive Summary
  • Scope and Methodology
    • Scope of Report
    • Report Methodology

  • Boomer Demographics
    • Introduction: A Force to Be Reckoned With
    • Boomers by the Numbers

  • Boomer Lifestyles
    • By All Accounts: Active
    • Growing Up, Not Growing Old
    • The Cyclical Nature of “Lifestyles”

  • Diet and Health
    • Age-Related Health Conditions Weighing In
    • Scant Savings Leave Little Room for Illness
    • Calorie-Conscious Boomers Grapple with the “Hovering Shoulds”
    • Figure 1-1: Overview of Diet- and Health-Related Lifestyle Statements: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
    • Food, Pharma, Fitness—A Three-Pronged Approach to Looking Great

  • Boomers and Technology
    • Upping the Ante
    • Information Aging: Boomers Look for Long-Term, No-Nonsense Functionality
    • Working Smarter in Retirement: Boomers Tune In, Turn On, Drop Back In (To the Office)

  • Boomers and Home Buying
    • Pioneering a Way to Live
    • Boomer Homes Express Tastes, Values, Style
    • Simplicity Means Low Maintenance, High Comfort, Convenience

  • Boomers and Travel/Transportation
    • It’s (Still) All About the Experience
    • Travel Enables Boomers to Set Aside Daily Cares
    • Curious Boomers Open to U.S. and Foreign Travel
    • Experience at the Core of Boomer Vacation Travel

  • Boomers and Personal Finance
    • Spending vs. Saving, the Boomer Way
    • Financial Well-Being: A Matter of Fact or a Matter of Faith?
    • Savings, Securities, Real Estate Fund Future Goals
    • Loans, Insurance Costs Keep Dollars Flowing Out
    • Fidelity Investments: Never Stop Doing What You Love

Chapter 2: Boomer Demographics

  • Introduction
    • A Force to Be Reckoned With
    • Boomers by the Numbers
    • Figure 2-1: Baby Boomers by Level of Educational Attainment: All, Men, Women, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
    • It’s All About “We”
    • Marketers Behind the Boomer Curve?
    • Getting with the Program
    • Speaking of Age…Don’t
    • It’s Always About Youth
    • Never Talk Numbers (Avoid the Pitfall Entirely)
    • Incorporate an Emotional Appeal
    • Accentuate the Positive
    • Meet the New Kids in Town: Grandparents
    • Factor in Diversity: Boomers Are Always a Mixed Bag
    • Follow Boomer Lead in Redefining Retirement
    • Figure 2-2: Baby Boomer Indices by Employment Status, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
    • Table 2-1: Overview of Baby Boomer Demographics, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
    • Table 2-2: Overview of Baby Boomer Demographics: Adults Age 40-49, 2005 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 2-3: Overview of Baby Boomer Demographics: Adults Age 50-59, 2005 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 2-4: Overview of Baby Boomer Demographics: Men, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
    • Table 2-5: Overview of Baby Boomer Demographics: Women, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
    • Table 2-6: Overview of Baby Boomer Demographics: Non-Hispanic Whites, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
    • Table 2-7: Overview of Baby Boomer Demographics: Hispanic Americans, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
    • Table 2-8: Overview of Baby Boomer Demographics: African Americans, 2005 (U.S. adults 40-59)

Chapter 3: Boomer Lifestyles

  • By All Accounts: Active
  • Growing Up, Not Growing Old
  • The Cyclical Nature of “Lifestyles”
  • Boomers Want to Keep On Being Me
  • Youth and “You Look Great”
  • Boomerangst—The Corollary to “Having it All”
  • A Little Mayo on that Stress Sandwich?
  • Figure 3-1: Boomer Indices for Selected Work-Related Lifestyle Statements, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Hoping the Corollary Won’t Turn into a Coronary
  • Spread Thin (a.k.a. Must Not Fall Behind in Day’s Routine)
  • To Maintain Control, Boomers Must Stay Healthy, Connected
  • It’s Easier to Stay Healthy Than to Get Healthy
  • Internet Keeps Boomers In Touch, On Task
  • The Care and Feeding of Kids—Who’s Parenting Whom?
  • Figure 3-2: Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Households With One or More Children: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Money Can’t Buy My Children’s Love, But the Thank You Points Don’t Hurt
  • Kids in College—Finding the Echo in the Boom
  • So Let’s Both Go to School!
  • Empty Nesters: The Gray-Haired Twenty-Somethings
  • For Boomers and Beyond, Smart Marketing Requires Long-Term Strategies
  • Successful Campaigns Emphasize Life Stage, Not Age
  • Table 3-1: Selected Lifestyle Statements: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 3-2: Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Those in Top 10% Socio-Economically: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 3-3: Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Those in Top 11%-30% Socio-Economically: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 3-4: Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Those in Middle 31%-60% Socio-Economically: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 3-5: Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Households With One or More Children: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 3-6: Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Those Who Have Had a Child Enter College in the Last Year: Adults Overall vs. Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 3-7: Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Those Whose Youngest Child Has Graduated College in the Last Year: Adults Overall vs. Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 3-8: Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Those Who Have Retired or Taken Early Retirement in the Last Year: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 3-9: Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Those Who Do Not Have Children at Home: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)

Chapter 4: Diet and Health

  • Age-Related Health Conditions Weighing In
  • Scant Savings Leave Little Room for Illness
  • Calorie-Conscious Boomers Grapple with the “Hovering Shoulds”
  • Figure 4-1: Overview of Diet- and Health-Related Lifestyle Statements: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Food, Pharma, Fitness—A Three-Pronged Approach to Looking Great
  • Boomers Take Health Matters Into Their Own Hands
  • Food Multi-Tasks as Nutrition, Medicine, Indulgence
  • Nutritional Awareness Highest Among Empty Nesters, Singles
  • Figure 4-2: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement with Statement: I Work at Eating a Well-Balanced Diet, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • The Restaurant Rule: If I Spend Enough Money, the Calories Don’t Count
  • Fortified or Functional Foods Gain Popularity
  • Food Pyramids Build Extra Knowledge
  • Food Additives Build In Extra Health
  • Nutrition 101—Getting the Word Out and the Wellness In
  • Supermarket Boutiques Offer Holistic Education in Mainstream Settings
  • Pharmacy Wellness Clinics Offer Education, Prevention, Healing
  • Over-the-Counter Remedies Keep Medical Costs Down
  • Wellness Services Weigh In: From the Ounce of Prevention to the Pound of Cure
  • Boomers Use Dietary Supplements for Prevention and Maintenance
  • Skin Care Products Prolong Youthful Appearance
  • Successful Campaigns Promote Education, Community, Empowerment
  • Boomers Reject Old Age (Surely There’s Something We Can Take For It!)
  • Exercise and Fitness: An Unbeatable Combination
  • Once a Jock, Always a Jock
  • Fitness-Forward Boomers Control Their Own Health Regimens
  • No Pain, No Pain: Positive Experiences Coax Boomers off the Couch
  • Accentuate the Positive: Curves’ Business Model Makes Exercise Fun
  • New Aging: The Spiritual Side of Boomer Work-Outs
  • Alternative Medicine Transforms Mid-Life Crisis to Mid-Life Quest
  • What’s Ahead Healthwise? Boomers Have Plenty of Time to Figure It Out
  • Table 4-1: Overview of Diet- and Health-Related Lifestyle Statements: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 4-2: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement with Statement: I Am Too Busy To Take Care of Myself as I Should, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 4-3: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement with Statement: I Am Currently Dieting, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 4-4: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement with Statement: I Work at Eating a Well-Balanced Diet, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 4-5: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement with Statement: I Consider My Diet to Be Very Healthy, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 4-6: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Use of Nutritional Supplements, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 4-7: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement with Statement: I Should Exercise More Than I Do, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 4-8: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Participating Regularly in Exercise, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 4-9: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Participating in a Sport at Every Chance, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 4-10: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Participation in Yoga, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 4-11: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Trust in Homeopathic Medicine, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 4-12: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Preference of Alternative Medicine to Standard Medical Practice, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)

Chapter 5: Boomers and Technology

  • Upping the Ante
  • Information Aging: Boomers Look for Long-Term, No-Nonsense Functionality
  • Figure 5-1: Agreement with Statement: “The Internet Has Changed The Way I Work”: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Working Smarter in Retirement: Boomers Tune In, Turn On, Drop Back In (To the Office)
  • Corporate Internet Communities Keep Semi-Retired Boomers in the Loop
  • Function, Focus, Value: Boomers Research Tech Before They Buy
  • World Wide Web: The Boomer Information Playground
  • PCs Keep Boomer Households Working, Learning, Playing
  • Surfing USA: Boomers Use Internet for Research, Streamlining Schedules, Communication
  • Heavy Web Traffic: Finance, Health and Wellness, Travel
  • Web Security: Boomers Less Vigilant Than Gen X, More Savvy Than Seniors
  • The Online Gender Gap: Are Men Really From Mars.com?
  • Email: The Universal Communicator
  • Figure 5-2: Use Personal Computer in Household for Internet/Email: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Cell Phones: Moving from Relevant to Indispensable
  • Cell Phones Facilitate Professional, Personal Agendas
  • Boomers Want a Phone, Not a Toy
  • Talking vs. Texting: What’s a Boomer to Do?
  • Cell Phones Enhance Boomer Quality of Life—Stylishly
  • Health Directions in Cell Phones: Is That a Doctor in Your Pocket?
  • Portable Music Players: Establish Relevance, and Maybe They’ll Catch On
  • Despite MP3 Ascendancy, Boomers Loyal to Their Listening Roots
  • Aging Up the iPod with Appeal to Storage Capabilities, Education, Culture
  • Again with the Health Monitoring: The MP3 Becomes Dr. Digital
  • Electronic Medical Records Enhance Boomer Mobility, Self-Reliance
  • Best Buy Testing New Store Concepts
  • Best Buy’s Woman-Centric Gambit: eq-life
  • A Personal Journey
  • But I Just Wanted a Software Upgrade…
  • Helen: The Pocketbook That Launched a Thousand Shifts
  • Company Blogs: Another Roadside Attraction on the Information Highway
  • Transparency, Immediacy Crucial to the Blogosphere
  • Customer-centric Blogs Encourage Community, Brand Loyalty
  • Blogging Amongst Themselves: First Hand Information for Marketers
  • Table 5-1: Overview of Technology- and Media-Related Lifestyle Statements: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 5-2: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: The Internet Has Changed the Way I Work, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-3: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: The Internet Has Increased My Desire to Learn/Search, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-4: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: For Information, The First Place I Look Is The Internet, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-5: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: The Internet Is the Prime Source of My Family’s Entertainment, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-6: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: I Like to Learn About Computer Technology/The Web, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-7: Overview of Purposes Personal Computers in the Household Are Used For: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 5-8: Overview of Computer Software Types Owned by Household: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 5-9: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Having a Home Computer Network, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-10: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Use of Online Banking Services in the Last 30 Days, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-11: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Use of the Internet for Financial Information/Stock Trading Within the Last 30 Days, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-12: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Use of the Internet for Medical Information and Services Within the Last 30 Days, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-13: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Use of the Internet to Gather Information for Shopping Within the Last 30 Days, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-14: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Use of the Internet to Make a Purchase Within the Last 30 Days, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-15: Overview of Websites/Search Engines Used in Last 30 Days: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 5-16: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Ownership of Cell Phone, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-17: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Ownership of Cell Phone for Business Use, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-18: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Ownership of Cell Phone for Personal Use, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-19: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Use of Cell Phone Text Messaging Services, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-20: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Purchase of Digital Music/MP3 Player in Last 12 Months, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-21: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Computer Downloading of Music Files in the Last 30 Days, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-22: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Ownership of Digital Camera, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 5-23: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Use of Online Digital Imaging/Photo Album Services in the Last 30 Days, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)

Chapter 6: Boomers and Home Buying

  • Pioneering a Way to Live
  • Boomer Homes Express Tastes, Values, Style
  • Figure 6-1: Home Ownership Rates by Type of Home: Baby Boomer Adults (Age 40-59) vs. Non-Baby Boomer Adults, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Empty Nesters, Just-Marrieds, Singles Stoke the Home Fires
  • Home Improvement Strengthens Kinship with Sheetrock, Plumbing
  • Simplicity Means Low Maintenance, High Comfort, Convenience
  • Disaster Requires Re-Evaluation, Re-Invention
  • Living Into the Next Century—Looking to Future Markets
  • Home Ownership Common Across Socio-Economic Strata
  • Hispanic Boomers Buy First Homes
  • Figure 6-2: High-Index Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Purchase of First Home in Last 12 Months, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Repeat Home Buyers Consider Their Future
  • Repeat Home Buyers: Middle Class and Up, College Grads, Remarried
  • Remodeling Makes New, Refinanced Homes Boomer Friendly
  • Home Values Cluster in Low to Mid-$100,000s
  • Age Counts When it Comes to Property Taxes, Financial Planning
  • Will Escalating Home Prices Burst Boomers’ Bubble?
  • Bubble Worries Don’t Stop Home Purchases
  • Second Homes: Affluent Boomers Seek Creature Comforts x 2
  • Diversify Investments, Collect Rent, Escape
  • Vacation, Weekend Home Owners Skew to Northeast, East Central Regions
  • Vacation Retreats Favor Sun, Water, Increasing Value
  • Vacation Rentals Offer Convenience, Relaxation, No Strings
  • Time Shares Provide Control Without Hassles
  • Fractionals: Greater Equity, Greater Freedom
  • Private Residence Clubs, Destination Clubs: Luxury Crash Pads
  • Leisure Equity: The Perfect Boomer Investment
  • Condominiums Attract Empty Nesters, Singles, Professionals
  • Condos Provide Downtown Convenience, Access to Cultural Amenities
  • Security, Convenience, Affordable Style
  • Same as It Ever Was: Boomers Seek Simplicity, Community, Style
  • Retirement Communities Adapt to Boomer Values
  • Sports, Family, Career Goals Define Adult Communities
  • Cohousing Updates Early Boomer Ideals
  • Cohousing Communities Make Their Own Rules
  • Aging in Place Ensures Community, Independence, Creativity
  • Table 6-1: Overview of Type(s) of Residence: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 6-2: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: My Home Is an Important Part of Who I Am, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 6-3: Overview of Home-Related Lifestyle Statements: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 6-4: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: Prefer to Spend a Quiet Evening at Home, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 6-5: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Home Ownership, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 6-6: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Purchase of First Home in Last 12 Months, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 6-7: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Purchase of New Home (Not First Home) in Last 12 Months, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 6-8: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: Am Looking for New Ideas to Improve Home, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 6-9: Overview of Home Remodeling Done in Last 12 Months: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 6-10: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Making Major Home Improvements in Last 12 Months, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 6-11: Overview of Value of Main Residence: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 6-12: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Ownership of Vacation/Weekend Home, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 6-13: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Renting a Vacation/Weekend Home, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 6-14: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Ownership of a Timeshare, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 6-15: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Condo Ownership, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)

Chapter 7: Boomers and Travel/Transportation

  • It’s (Still) All About the Experience
  • Travel Enables Boomers to Set Aside Daily Cares
  • Curious Boomers Open to U.S. and Foreign Travel
  • Experience at the Core of Boomer Vacation Travel
  • Vacation Tours Have Boomer Appeal—Just Don’t Overbook Me
  • Frequent Travel for Business, Pleasure
  • Figure 7-1: Domestic Travel in Last 12 Months: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Recreation and Resort Destinations Emphasize Exercise, Activities
  • Resort Vacations Pique Boomers’ Long-Term Interests
  • Independent Boomers Favor Road Trips
  • Boomers Like Driving, Demand Safety and Reliability
  • Sedans, SUVs, Luxury Vehicles Lead Boomer Vehicle Choice
  • Sedans Dominate, But Hankerings for Muscle Cars Remain
  • SUVs and Pick-Ups Fit Active Lifestyles
  • Luxury Cars Afford Quality, Style
  • RVs: Upfront Costs, Long-Term Savings
  • Hotels and Motels See Booming Boomer Business
  • Online Reservations Popular for Hotels/Motels and Rental Cars
  • Foreign Travel Experiences Lure Asian, Hispanic, Black Boomers
  • Despite Deep Pockets, Boomers Demand Value for the Dollar
  • Luxurious Accommodations Tempt Even the Most Adventurous
  • Cruises Offer Adventure, Education, Cultural Immersion
  • Luxury on the Waves: Spas, Gourmet Dining, Wine Tasting
  • Table 7-1: Overview of Transportation and Travel-Related Lifestyle Statements: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 7-2: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: Prefer U.S. to Foreign Travel, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 7-3a: Overview of Domestic Travel Patterns in Last 12 Months: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 7-3b: Overview of Foreign Travel Patterns in Last Three Years: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 7-4: Resort Vacations in the Last 12 Months: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 7-5: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: Often Go on Long Car Trips for Vacation, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 7-6: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: I Like Driving, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 7-7: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: A Used Car Is Just as Good as a New Car, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 7-8: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: Normally Buy Cars Brand New, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 7-9: Overview of Vehicle Ownership Patterns: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 7-10: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: SUV Matches My Active Lifestyle, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 7-11: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: Prefer Driving a Luxury Vehicle 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 7-12: Hotel/Motel Usage in Last 12 Months: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 7-13: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Use of the Internet for Airline/Car Rental/Hotel Information in the Last 30 Days, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 7-14: Vehicle Rental in Last 12 Months: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 7-15: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Disagreement With Statement: Prefer U.S. to Foreign Travel, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 7-16: Overview of Cruise Ship Vacations: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)

Chapter 8: Boomers and Personal Finance

  • Spending vs. Saving, the Boomer Way
  • Financial Well-Being: A Matter of Fact or a Matter of Faith?
  • Savings, Securities, Real Estate Fund Future Goals
  • Loans, Insurance Costs Keep Dollars Flowing Out
  • Credit Cards: Another Necessary Cash Drain
  • Retirement Assets Provide Some Security
  • Figure 8-1: Total Value of Securities Owned: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Even Financial Whizzes Say Time Is More Important Than Money
  • Empty Nesters, Well-To-Do Believe Time More Important Than Money
  • Empty Nesters, Well-To-Do Believe In Their Own Strong Financial Skills
  • Figure 8-2: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: Am Very Good at Managing Money, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Boomer Outlook May Be Overly Optimistic
  • Empty Nesters, Well-Educated, Asians, Conservatives Are Careful with Money—But Does That Mean They Manage It Well?
  • Younger Boomers, the Under-educated, and the Poor Have Little Savings
  • Homemakers, Widowed, Divorced, Separated, and Renters Find Saving Tough
  • Saving Money Does Not Equal Managing It
  • Many Boomers Do Their Own Research, Eschew Professional Advice
  • Many Neglect to Factor in Possible Future Medical Costs
  • Maturing Outlook May Obviate Looming Crises—Or Not
  • Financial Advisors Advocate Personal, Boomer-centric Approach
  • Well-to-do, Well Educated, Home Owners Require Solid Information Before Committing to Financial Services
  • Banks Slow to Adopt Holistic Financial Management Services
  • Millionaires, Sure—But Millions of Regular Joes Need Comprehensive Financial Advice, Too
  • Customer Relations, Segmentation, Group Interaction, IT Integration
  • Facilitate Boomers’ Own Research Goals
  • Soaring Healthcare Costs Should Spur Personalized Strategies
  • HSAs, Long-Term Care Insurance, Disease Management Options
  • Reverse Mortgages Can Finance Long-Term Care
  • Others’ Struggles Get Boomers’ Attention
  • Successful Marketing Incorporates Emotional Appeal
  • Fidelity Investments: Never Stop Doing What You Love
  • American Express: My Life, My Card
  • Ameriprise: What’s Next
  • Campaign Caveat: Never Patronize a Boomer
  • Table 8-1: Overview of Investment and Banking Patterns: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 8-2: Overview of Insurance Patterns: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 8-3: Overview of Credit Card Usage Patterns: Adults Overall, Non-Baby Boomer Adults, and Baby Boomers, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 8-4: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: How I Spend Time Is More Important Than Money, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 8-5: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: Am Very Good at Managing Money, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 8-6: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: In Job, Security Is More Important Than Money, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 8-7: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: I’m Careful With My Money, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 8-8: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: I’m No Good at Saving Money, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 8-9: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: Financial Security for Retirement Is Individual Responsibility, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 8-10: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: I Read the Financial Pages of My Newspaper, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 8-11: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: I Don’t Like the Idea of Being in Debt, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)
  • Table 8-12: Baby Boomer Traits Favoring Agreement With Statement: Like to Know as Much as Possible Before Committing to Financial Services, 2005 (U.S. adults age 40-59)

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