The Affluent Consumer Market in the U.S., 6th Edition

Dec 1, 2011
180 Pages - Pub ID: LA6135732
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This completely new edition of Packaged Facts The Affluent Consumer Market in the U.S. finds an affluent consumer population that is considerably more upbeat than in 2009 when the last edition of the report was published. Experian Simmons National Consumer Study data show that affluent consumer confidence was on the rise in 2011. Compared to 2009, the proportion of affluent consumers reporting that they were financially better off than 12 months before had doubled. Spending among the affluent was up, and a wide range of consumer research organizations foresaw even more robust spending by affluent consumers in the coming year.

Packaged Facts The Affluent Consumer Market in the U.S. provides marketers with crucial insights into the mindset and behavior of affluent consumers. Affluent consumers remain the driving force of the American economy and play an outsized role in creating opportunities for marketers. The average income of households with an income of $150,000 or more remains 10 times higher than that of non-affluent households. Those in this income bracket make up only 7% of all consumer units but account for 17% of all consumer expenditures.

The first chapter of the report provides an in-depth analysis of the evolution of the mindset of affluent consumers from 2008 through 2011 and highlights opportunities generated by the shopping and spending patterns of affluent consumers. After a chapter that measures the current size and future growth of the affluent consumer market, the report presents a demographic profile of affluent consumers. The next chapter contains an assessment of the behavior of affluent consumers across generations. Another chapter demonstrates how affluent consumers have changed their post-recession spending priorities. Following an overview of how affluent consumers use financial services, the report tracks the behavior of affluent shoppers in the areas of food, the home, consumer electronics and automotive. The final chapter of the report analyzes the media consumption habits of affluent consumers with an emphasis on their involvement with social media.

Packaged Facts divides the affluent consumer market into three segments. Mass affluent consumers are adults who live in households with a household income of $100,000-$149,999. Highly affluent consumers are those living in households with a household income of $150,000-$249,999. Super-affluent consumers are adults in households with a household income of $250,000 or more.

The principal primary research source is the Experian Simmons National Consumer Study (NCS). The report includes data tracking the attitudes of affluent NCS respondents from 2007 through 2011. The report cites survey research data from a wide range of firms specializing in the affluent consumer market and includes a comprehensive analysis of relevant industry and trade publications. U.S. Government data sources include the American Community Survey and Current Population Survey of the U.S. Census Bureau and the Consumer Expenditure Survey of the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Chapter 1 Executive Summary
Background
Introduction
Overview of the Report
Scope and Methodology
Scope of the Market
Methodology
Trends and Opportunities in the Affluent Consumer Market
Affluent Consumer Confidence on the Rise
Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers Feel Better about Their Finances
Affluent Consumer Spending Picks Up
More Spending Seen on the Horizon
Stabilizing Home Values Bolster Hopes of Affluent Homeowners
Rising Income Inequality Increases Clout of Affluent Consumers
Affluent Exercise Disproportionate Spending Power
Overview of the Affluent Consumer Market
Number of Affluent Households Hits 24 Million
Vast Differences in Household Income Levels
Boomers Generate Bulk of Affluent Household Income
Affluent Consumer Market Expected to Show Moderate Growth
One in Five Affluent Households Found in Just Four Metro Areas
Affluent Spending Power of New York Metro Area Dwarfs All Others
The Demographics of Affluence
55 Million Americans Live in Affluent Households
Affluence Extends to Young Adults
High Correlation between Education and Affluence
Super-Affluent More Likely to Put in Long Hours on the Job
Affluent Point to “Hard Work” as Source of Wealth
Health Care and Other Professional Services Generate Major Share of Affluent Consumers
Stable Employment a Marker of Affluence
Affluent More Likely to Work for Large Companies
Multi-Income Families Key to Affluence
A Generational View of Affluent Consumers
Differences in Life Stages Affect Spending Choices of Affluent Consumers
Gen-X Affluent Consumers Keep Pace with Online Spending of Their Gen-Y Counterparts
Gen-Y and Gen-X Affluent Consumers Top Targets for Mobile Marketers
Mall Shopping Peaks with Gen-X Affluent Consumers
Sales Less Likely to Attract Older Affluent Shoppers
Lives of Affluent Millennials Entwined with Social Media
Affluent Millennials on Leading Edge of New Media
Major Generational Differences in Consumption of Legacy Media
How Affluent Consumers Spend Their Money
Affluent Consumers Play Outsized Economic Role
Affluent Responsible for Increasingly Large Share of Spending
Mass Affluent Consumers Provide Post-Recession Lift
Overall Spending by Affluent Consumers Declined between 2008 and 2010
Downward Mobility Affects Affluent Consumer Spending
Wide Gap Remains between Annual Spending of Affluent and Other Consumers
Changes in Spending Patterns Reveal How Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers Made Do with Less in 2010 than in 2008
How Affluent Consumers Manage Their Money
Aura of Financial Success Important to Affluent Consumers
Super-Affluent Less Adverse to Risk
Online Trading Popular among Highly and Super-Affluent
Super-Affluent Favor CPAs for Tax Preparation
Credit Cards Differentiate Affluent from Other Consumers
Affluent Consumers Far Less Likely to Carry Credit Card Balances
Online Bill Paying More Popular among Affluent
Data Show Concentration of Wealth
Commercial Banks Get Lion’s Share of Affluent Consumers Business
Super-Affluent Turn to High-Value Life Insurance Policies
Overview of Affluent Shoppers
Affluent Buyers Look for Respect from Others
Affluent Shoppers Impressed by Store Environment
Specialty Stores Highly Regarded by Super-Affluent
Super-Affluent Unfazed by Price, Mass Affluent Not So Much
Affluent Open to Using Cell Phones for Store Purchases
Incentive Offers Intrigue Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers
Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers Are Frequent Shoppers
Super-Affluent Are Avid Online Buyers
Super-Affluent Consumers Are Frequent Catalog Shoppers
Highlights of Affluent Consumer Behavior
Super-Affluent Focus on Keeping Trim
Gourmet Foods Attract Affluent
Super-Affluent Look for Organic Foods at Grocery Store
Affluent Big Spenders on Household Furnishings
Home Improvement Projects Part of Affluent Lifestyle
Many DIYers among Affluent Consumers
Super-Affluent Consumers Are Early Adopters of Electronics Products
Many Affluent Household Garages Contain Multiple Vehicles
Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers Fixate on Foreign Cars
Affluent Consumers and Media
Affluent Tied to Social Media
Affluent Heavily Engaged with Social Media
Affluent Use Multiple Devices to Access Social Media
Opinions of Friends More Important than What Companies Claim on Social Sites
Social Media Influence Retail Choices of Super-Affluent Consumers
Highly and Super-Affluent Most Involved with Online Media
Super-Affluent Readers Stay Loyal to Newspapers
Television Less Important to Affluent
Affluent Most Likely to Listen to News/Talk Radio Formats


Chapter 2 Trends and Opportunities in the Affluent Consumer Market
Market Trends
Affluent Consumer Confidence on the Rise
Table 2-1: Percent of Affluent and Non-Affluent Consumers Expressing Low Level of Consumer Confidence by Selected Time Periods, 2006-2011
Table 2-2: Percent of Affluent and Non-Affluent Consumers Expressing High Level of Consumer Confidence by Selected Time Periods, 2006-2011
Self-Employed Affluent Consumers More Cautious about the Future
Table 2-3: Levels of Consumer Confidence in 2011, Self-Employed Affluent Consumers vs. Those Employed by Others
Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers Feel Better about Their Finances
Table 2-4: Perceptions of Financial Well-Being of Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers, December 2008-June 2011
Affluent Consumer Spending Picks Up
Table 2-5: Trends in Purchasing Behavior of Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers, December 2008-June 2011
Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers See More Spending on the Horizon
Table 2-6: Spending Plans of Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers, December 2008-June 2011
Wealthiest Consumers May Postpone New Car Purchases
Table 2-7: Plans of Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers for Next Vehicle Purchase, December 2008-June 2011
Stabilizing Home Values Bolster Hopes of Affluent Homeowners
Figure 2-1: Average Household Income of Super-Affluent Consumers, 2000-2010
Figure 2-2: Average Market Value of Homes Owned by Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers by Selected Periods, 2004-2010
Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers Unhappy about Standard of Living
Table 2-8: Indicators of Sense of Financial Security among Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers, December 2008-June 2011
Market Volatility Seen as “New Normal” by Many Affluent Consumers
Luxury Retailers Stick to Full-Price Selling
Other Marketers Turn to Deal Sites to Lure Affluent Consumers
Market Opportunities
Rising Income Inequality Continues to Increase Relative Clout of Affluent Consumers
Table 2-9: Growth in Real After-Tax Income by Income Bracket, 1979-2007
Affluent Exercise Disproportionate Spending Power in Wide Range of Areas
Table 2-10: Where Affluent Consumers Have the Biggest Impact on Consumer Spending
Opportunities in Affluent Consumer Market Highlighted
Table 2-11: Highlights of Opportunities in Affluent Consumer Market


Chapter 3 Overview of the Affluent Consumer Market
Current Size of the Affluent Consumer Market
Measuring the Size the Affluent Market
Number of Affluent Households Hits 24 Million
Table 3-1: Number of Affluent Households by Amount of Household Income, 2011
Table 3-2: Affluent Consumer Segments as Percentage of Affluent Consumer Households
Table 3-3: Aggregate Household Income, Affluent vs. Non-Affluent by Category of Affluent Household, 2008
Table 3-4: Aggregate Income of Affluent Households by Category of Affluent Household
Vast Differences in Household Income Levels
Figure 3-1: Mean Household Income of Affluent and Other Households, 2010
Boomers Generate Bulk of Affluent Household Income
Table 3-5: Aggregate Income of Affluent Households by Age Group
Figure 3-2: Mean Income of Affluent Households by Age of Household Head
Projected Growth of the Affluent Consumer Market
Affluent Households Maintain Pivotal Role in American Economy
Table 3-6: Number of Affluent Households, 2001-2010
Affluent Consumer Market Expected to Show Moderate Growth
Table 3-7: Projected Size and Growth of Affluent Market, 2011-2016
Major Affluent Consumer Markets
One in Five Affluent Households Found in Just Four Metro Areas
Table 3-8: Metropolitan Areas Ranked by Number of Affluent Households
Top 20 Metro Areas Account for Bulk of Highly and Super Affluent Households
Table 3-9: Number of Affluent Households, Top 20 Metropolitan Areas vs. All Other Areas
Affluent Spending Power of New York Metro Area Dwarfs All Others
Table 3-10: Metropolitan Areas Ranked by Aggregate Income of Affluent Households
Table 3-11: Aggregate Household Income, Super/Highly Affluent Households in New York Metro Area vs. Selected States
Silicon Valley Has Highest Concentration of Affluent Households
Table 3-12: Metropolitan Areas Ranked by Affluent Households as Percent of All Households in Area


Chapter 4 The Demographics of Affluence
Demographic Profile of Affluent Consumers
55 Million Americans Live in Affluent Households
Table 4-1: Number of Affluent U.S. Adults, 2011
Number of Affluent Consumers Retreats to 2007 Level
Table 4-2: Population of Affluent Consumers, 2007-2011
Affluence Extends to Young Adults
Table 4-3: Selected Demographic Characteristics, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Affluence an Urban Phenomenon
Table 4-4: Place of Residence, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
High Correlation between Education and Affluence
Table 4-5: Educational Achievement, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Super-Affluent More Likely to Put in Long Hours on the Job
Table 4-6: Employment Profile, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Affluent Point to “Hard Work” as Source of Wealth
Health Care and Other Professional Services Generate Major Share of Affluent Consumers
Table 4-7: Industry and Occupational Profile, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Stable Employment a Marker of Affluence
Figure 4-1: Percent Working Five or More Years for Current Employer, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Affluent More Likely to Work for Large Companies
Table 4-8: Size of Company Employing Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Figure 4-2: Percent Employed by Fortune 500 Companies, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Multi-Income Families Key to Affluence
Table 4-9: Marital and Family Status, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Vacation and Weekend Homes More Common among Super-Affluent
Table 4-10: Homeownership Profile, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Figure 4-3: Percent Owning Vacation or Weekend Home, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Social and Political Profile
Data Throw Country Club Stereotype into Question
Table 4-11: Memberships, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Super-Affluent Consumers More Likely to Espouse Liberal Values
Table 4-12: Social Values, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Affluent as Likely to Be Democrat as Republican
Table 4-13: Political Profile, Affluent vs. Other Consumers


Chapter 5 A Generational View of Affluent Consumers
Demographic Differences
Overview
Substantial Demographic Differences across Age Groups in Affluent Consumer Segment
Table 5-1: Demographic Profile of Affluent Consumers by Age Group
Political Views of Affluent Change with Age
Table 5-2: Political and Social Profile, Affluent vs. Other Consumers by Age Group
Financial Profile
Older Affluent Consumers Most Likely to Feel Secure, Least Likely to Feel Confident about the Future
Table 5-3: Measures of Consumer Confidence, Affluent vs. Other Consumers by Age Group
Affluent Millennials Better Off Than Non-Affluent Boomers
Table 5-4: Financial Profile, Affluent vs. Other Consumers by Age Group
Millennials Seen as “Emerging Affluents”
Affluent Millennials Have Different Views of Wealth
Overview of Consumer Behavior
Differences in Life Stages Affect Spending Choices of Affluent Consumers
Gen-X Affluent Consumers Keep Pace with Online Spending of Their Gen-Y Counterparts
Table 5-5: Use of the Internet for Shopping, Affluent vs. Other Consumers by Age Group
Gen-Y and Gen-X Affluent Consumers Top Targets for Mobile Marketers
Table 5-6: Percent Interested in Using Cell Phone for Purchases, Affluent vs. Other Consumers by Age Group
Millennials Turned Off by Catalogs, Affluent GenXers Like Them
Table 5-7: Percent Purchasing Items from Catalog in Last 12 Months, Affluent vs. Other Consumers by Age Group
Mall Shopping Peaks with Gen-X Affluent Consumers
Table 5-8: Shopping Patterns, Affluent vs. Other Consumers by Age Group
Sales Less Likely to Attract Older Affluent Shoppers
Table 5-9: Attitudes toward Sales and Bargains, Affluent vs. Other Consumers by Age Group
Brand Awareness Highest among Millennials
Table 5-10: Brand Awareness, Affluent vs. Other Consumers by Age Group
Impact of Social Media on Consumer Behavior
Lives of Affluent Millennials Entwined with Social Media
Table 5-11: Use of Social Media, Affluent vs. Other Consumers by Age Group
Younger Consumers at All Income Levels More Likely to Follow Favorite Brands on Social Sites
Table 5-12: Impact of Social Media on Consumer Behavior, Affluent vs. Other Consumers by Age Group
Media Usage and Receptivity to Advertising
Affluent Millennials on Leading Edge of New Media
Table 5-13: Online Media Activities in Last 30 Days, Affluent vs. Other Consumers by Age Group
Major Generational Differences in Consumption of Legacy Media
Table 5-14: Attitudes toward Legacy Media, Affluent vs. Other Consumers by Age Group
Affluent Gen-X Consumers More Open to Advertising
Table 5-15: Attitudes toward Advertising, Affluent vs. Other Consumers by Age Group
Affluent Consumers Less Likely to Respond to Product Placement
Table 5-16: Attitudes toward Product Placement, Affluent vs. Other Consumers by Age Group


Chapter 6 How Affluent Consumers Spend Their Money
Overview
Consumer Units Defined
Affluent Consumers Play Outsized Economic Role
Table 6-1: Expenditures of Consumer Units as Percent of Aggregate Consumer Expenditures in the United States in 2010, Affluent vs. Other Consumer Units
Affluent Responsible for Increasingly Large Share of Spending
Table 6-2: Expenditures of Consumer Units as Percent of Aggregate Consumer Expenditures in the United States 2003-2010, Affluent vs. Non-Affluent
Mass Affluent Consumers Provide Post-Recession Lift
Table 6-3: Average Annual Consumer Expenditures by Level of Income, 2007-2010
Overall Spending by Affluent Consumers Declined between 2008 and 2010
Table 6-4: Aggregate Annual Consumer Expenditures by Level of Income, 2008-2010
Downward Mobility Affects Affluent Consumer Spending
Table 6-5: Number of Consumer Units, Affluent vs. Other
Wide Gap Remains between Annual Spending of Affluent and Other Consumers
Figure 6-1: Average Annual Expenditures in 2010, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Changes in Spending Patterns Reveal How Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers Made Do with Less in 2010 than in 2008
Eating Out Gives Way to Eating at Home
Spending on Men’s Apparel Nosedives
Spending on Entertainment Shifts
Travel Spending Down
Renting Becomes More Common
Affluent Spend More on the Home and Less on Personal Services
Spending on Used Cars Increases, New Car Expenditures Drop
Healthcare Spending Rises
Personal Care Spending Down, Education Spending Continues Upward Path
Table 6-6: Trends in Spending by Highly and Super-Affluent Consumer Units, 2008-2010


Chapter 7 How Affluent Consumers Manage Their Money
Attitudes toward Personal Finances
Aura of Financial Success Important to Affluent Consumers
Figure 7-1: Percent Who “Like Other People to Think I’m a Financial Success,” Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Super-Affluent Consumers More Alert to Financial News
Table 7-1: Knowledge of Personal Finance, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Super-Affluent Shop for Deals for Financial Services
Table 7-2: Attitudes toward Financial Services, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Room for Improvement in Financial Services Ads
Figure 7-2: Percent Finding Ads for Financial Services Interesting, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Super-Affluent Less Adverse to Risk
Table 7-3: Attitudes toward Financial Risk, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Use of Financial Services
Online Trading Popular among Highly and Super-Affluent
Figure 7-3: Percent Having an Online Trading Account, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Figure 7-4: Percent Using Internet for Financial Information and Stock Trading, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Super-Affluent Favor CPAs for Tax Preparation
Table 7-4: How Prepared Tax Return in Last 12 Months, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Visa Wins Out over MasterCard Debit Cards
Table 7-5: Use of Debit/ATM Cards, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Credit Cards Differentiate Affluent from Other Consumers
Figure 7-5: Percent Having or Using Credit Card, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
American Express Successfully Targets Super-Affluent
Table 7-6: Use of Credit Cards, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Affluent Consumers Far Less Likely to Carry Credit Card Balances
Table 7-7: Portion of Bill Usually Paid, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Online Bill Paying More Popular among Affluent
Table 7-8: Method of Paying Bills, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Banking and Investments
Affluent More Likely to Own All Types of Investments
Table 7-9: Type of Investments Owned, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Data Show Concentration of Wealth
Table 7-10: Selected Investments with a Value of $100,00 or More, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Commercial Banks Get Lion’s Share of Affluent Consumers Business
Table 7-11: Banking and Investments by Type of Institution, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Affluent Remain Prime Customers for Lenders
Table 7-12: Type of Loans, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Ownership of Insurance
Super-Affluent Turn to High-Value Life Insurance Policies
Table 7-13: Ownership of Life Insurance, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Substantial Amounts of Property and Vehicle Insurance Also Common
Table 7-14: Property and Vehicle Insurance, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Umbrella Liability Insurance Attracts Super-Affluent Consumers
Table 7-15: Other Insurance, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Relatively Few Affluent Consumers Lack Health Insurance
Table 7-16: Ownership of Health/Hospital Insurance, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Table 7-17: Ownership of Health Insurance, Affluent vs. Other Consumers


Chapter 8 Overview of Affluent Shoppers
Shopping in Stores
Affluent Buyers Look for Respect from Others
Affluent Shoppers Impressed by Store Environment
Figure 8-1: Percent Agreeing a “Store’s Environment Makes a Difference in Whether I Shop There,” Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Specialty Stores Highly Regarded by Super-Affluent
Table 8-1: Shopping at Specialty Stores, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Super-Affluent Unfazed by Price, Mass Affluent Not So Much
Table 8-2: Impact of Price on Shopping and Buying, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Affluent Open to Using Cell Phones for Store Purchases
Figure 8-2: Percent Interested in Using Cell Phones for In-Store Purchases, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Incentive Offers Intrigue Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers
Figure 8-3: Percent Responding to Incentive Offers, Affluent Vs. Other Consumers
Table 8-3: Percent Responding to Incentive Offers by Type of Offer, Affluent Vs. Other Consumers
Affluent Consumers Are Frequent Shoppers
Table 8-4: Visits to Shopping Malls and Strip Malls in Last Four Weeks, Affluent Vs. Other Consumers
Affluent Shopper Retail Preferences Starkly Different from Those of Other Consumers
Table 8-5: Department/Discount/Children’s/Clothing Stores with Highest Percentage of Affluent Shoppers
Table 8-6: Department/Discount/Children’s/Clothing Stores with Lowest Percentage of Affluent Shoppers
Internet and Catalog Shopping by Affluent Consumers
Internet Has Had Greatest Impact on Affluent Buyer Behavior
Table 8-7: Impact of the Internet on Shopping Behavior, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Super-Affluent Are Avid Online Buyers
Figure 8-4: Made Online Purchase in Last 30 Days, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Figure 8-5: Spent $2,000 or More on the Internet in Past 12 Months, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Table 8-8: Items Ordered on the Internet in Past 12 Months, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Super-Affluent Consumers Are Frequent Catalog Shoppers
Table 8-9: Number of Catalog Purchases Made in Last 12 Months, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Table 8-10: Type of Merchandise Purchased from Catalogs in Last 12 Months, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Leading Catalog Retailers Listed
Table 8-11: Most Popular Catalogs, Affluent vs. Other Consumers


Chapter 9 Highlights of Affluent Consumer Behavior
Eating at Home
Super-Affluent Focus on Keeping Trim
Table 9-1: Attitudes toward Dieting, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Healthy Eating Has High Priority for Affluent Consumers
Table 9-2: Attitudes toward Healthy Eating, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Gourmet Foods Attract Affluent
Table 9-3: Meal Choices, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Super-Affluent Look for Organic Foods at Grocery Store
Table 9-4: Priorities When Shopping for Food, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Shopping for the Home
Super-Affluent Consumers Place High Priority on Home Decorating
Figure 9-1: Percent Agreeing “Home Décor Is of Particular Interest to Me,” Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Highly and Super-Affluent Prime Customers of Home Furnishings Stores
Figure 9-2: Percent Shopping at Home Furnishing Stores in Last Three Months, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Table 9-5: Percent Shopping at Home Furnishing Stores in Last Three Months by Name of Store, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Affluent Big Spenders on Household Furnishings
Table 9-6: Percent Purchasing Household Furniture and Appliances in Last 12 Months, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Home Improvement Projects Part of Affluent Lifestyle
Figure 9-3: Percent Shopping at Home Improvement Stores in Last Three Months, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Table 9-7: Percent Shopping at Home Improvement Stores in Last Three Months by Name of Store, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Table 9-8: Home Improvement Expenditures in Last 12 Months
Many DIYers among Affluent Consumers
Table 9-9: Home Remodeling Projects Performed in Last 12 Months
Table 9-10: Home Improvement Projects in Last 12 Months by Who Performed the Work, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Home Electronics
Super-Affluent Consumers Are Early Adopters
Table 9-11: Attitudes toward Home Electronics, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Gadgets Abound in Affluent Households
Table 9-12: Ownership of Home Electronics, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Shopping at Home Electronics Stores More Popular Among Affluent
Table 9-13: Percent Shopping at Home Electronics and Office Supply/Computer Stores in Last Three Months, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Cell Phones Universal among Affluent Consumers
Table 9-14: Cell Phone Ownership, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Automotive
Many Affluent Household Garages Contain Multiple Vehicles
Table 9-15: Profile of Vehicle Ownership, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Affluent View Cars as Part of Their Identity
Table 9-16: Attitudes toward Driving and Car Ownership, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Affluent Want to Have Fun Driving
Table 9-17: Reasons for Buying a Vehicle, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
New Cars a Must for Many Super-Affluent
Table 9-18: Attitudes toward New vs. Used Cars, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers Fixate on Foreign Cars
Table 9-19: Attitudes toward Foreign vs. Domestic Cars, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Table 9-20: Vehicle Model Types Owned and Bought New, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Table 9-21: Next Vehicle Purchase, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Table 9-22: Car Brands with Highest Percentage of Highly and Super-Affluent Owners


Chapter 10 Affluent Consumers and Media
Social Media
Affluent Tied to Social Media
Figure 10-1: Percent Using Social Media, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Figure 10-2: Percent Visiting Online Sharing Websites, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Daily Use of Social Media More Common
Table 10-1: Use of Social Media, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Affluent Heavily Engaged with Social Media
Table 10-2: Attitudes toward Online Sharing, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Affluent Use Multiple Devices to Access Social Media
Figure 10-3: Percent Accessing Social Sites from Different Devices
More Millionaires Sign Up for Facebook
Table 10-3: Visits to Online Sharing Websites, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Super-Affluent Consumers More Likely to Use Social Networks to Affiliate with Brands Rather than Look for Deals
Figure 10-4: Percent Who Like to Follow Favorite Brands or Companies on Social Sites, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Opinions of Friends More Important than What Companies Claim on Social Sites
Table 10-4: Attitudes toward Online Sharing, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Social Media Influence Retail Choices of Super-Affluent Consumers
Affluent Consumers and Online Media
Internet Has Greater Impact on Media Habits of Affluent Consumers
Table 10-5: Impact of the Internet on Media Usage, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Highly and Super-Affluent Most Involved with Online Media
Table 10-6: Highlights of Online Media and Entertainment Use by Highly and Super-Affluent Consumers
Affluent Consumers and Legacy Media
Super-Affluent Readers Stay Loyal to Newspapers
Table 10-7: Attitudes toward Newspapers, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Magazine Readership Dips among Affluent
Table 10-8: Attitudes toward Magazines, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Magazines with Highest Proportion of Highly and Super-Affluent Readers Listed
Table 10-9: Magazines with Highest Percentage of Highly Affluent and Super-Affluent Readers
Television Less Important to Affluent
Table 10-10: Attitudes toward Television, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Sports Channels Get Nod from Affluent Viewers
Table 10-11: Cable Television Networks with Highest Percentage of Highly Affluent and Super-Affluent Viewers
Affluent Listeners Important to Radio
Table 10-12: Attitudes toward Radio, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Affluent Most Likely to Listen to News/Talk Radio Formats
Table 10-13: Radio Formats with Highest Percentage of Highly Affluent and Super-Affluent Listeners
Receptivity to Advertising
Super-Affluent Consumers Down on Advertising
Table 10-14: Attitudes toward Advertising, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
TV Advertising Gets Short Shrift from Super-Affluent Consumers
Table 10-15: Attitudes toward Television Advertising, Affluent vs. Other Consumers
Magazine Ads Get Less Attention
Table 10-16: Attitudes toward Magazine Advertising, Affluent vs. Other Consumers


Appendix Addresses of Selected Affluent Market Resources

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