The Active Seniors Market

Published: Jan 1, 2002 - 278 Pages

Table of Contents:

  1. Executive Summary
    Scope and Methodology
    • Market Parameters
    • Report Methodology

    Statistical Overview
    • Who Are Active Seniors?
    • Lifestage as Important as Age
    • Active Seniors Increasing in Number
    • Social Security, Nest Eggs, Earnings Support Active Seniors
    • Fiscal Security Tempered by Healthcare Fears
    • Active Senior Demographic Snapshot
    • Home Ownership Very Important
    • Work and Retirement
    • Active Senior Aggregate Income to Reach $3.9 Trillion in 2006
    • Table 1-1: Active Senior Market Size and Growth, 1997-2006 (dollars)
    • The Mindset of Fiscal Security
    • Active Seniors Spend More Than They Earn

    Financial Management
    • Active Seniors a Strong Market for Financial Services
    • On Deck, Ikes and Boomers Will Think, Act Differently
    • Insurance Is Most Popular Financial Holding
    • Predatory Lending an Issue for Seniors and Marketers of Financial Services
    • Nearly All Active Seniors Hold Some Type of Health Insurance
    • Active Seniors Activate Charge Cards
    • Over Half of Active Seniors Hold Savings Accounts
    • Largest Holders of IRAs, Brokerage Accounts, and Mutual Fund Accounts
    • Active Seniors Bullish on Securities
    • Figure 1-1: Number of Adults Age 65-74 by Value of Securities Owned, 2000

    Home, Auto, Leisure
    • Active Seniors Have More Time for Leisure
    • Seniors Give Freely of Their Time
    • Active Seniors Big on Dining Out, Music, Reading, Gardening
    • Active Seniors Like to Go Out to Eat
    • Favorite Senior Restaurants Include Denny's, Cracker Barrel
    • Gardening Gets Active Seniors Out of Doors
    • Older Drivers Drawn to Large Domestic Vehicles
    • Older Car Buyers Look for Comfort, Convenience
    • Active Seniors Are Big Catalog Shoppers

    Computers and Communications
    • Ownership and Usage Rates Decline with Age
    • Wired Seniors a Small But Ardent Group
    • E-mail Is Most Popular Interactive Activity
    • Education the Key to Computer Literacy
    • Meeting Demand for Online Healthcare Information
    • Telephones Are Senior Lifelines
    • 7 Million Active Seniors Have a Cellular Phone

    Health And Fitness
    • Aging Brings Physical Changes
    • Half of Elderly Experience Chronic Health Conditions
    • Pharmacies a Senior Stronghold
    • Active Seniors Exercise Often
    • Seniors Stay Active at Health Clubs
    • Walking, Swimming Are Top Sports/Fitness Activities
    • Mall Walkers Mean Business
    • Active Seniors Tackle Fishing
    • Exercise Walking Shoes Step Ahead

    Travel and Vacation
    • Active Seniors Love Leisure Travel
    • Seniors Prefer Tours, Group Travel
    • Disney Leads in Multigenerational Marketing
    • Active Seniors Travel Outside Continental U.S.
    • Nearly Half of Active Seniors Take Overnight Domestic Trips
    • Over Half of Active Seniors Stay in Domestic Hotel/Motel
    • Older Travelers Choose to Cruise
    • Active Seniors Bet on Casino Gambling
  2. Statistical overview
    Introduction
    • Who Are Active Seniors?
    • Market Definition
    • Note on Simmons Market Research Bureau Data

    Population
    • Active Senior Population Increasing in Number
    • Table 2-1: Population of Active Seniors Age 65-74 vs. All Adults, 1997-2025 (number)

    Income
    • Social Security, Nest Eggs, Earnings Support Active Seniors
    • Median Household Income
    • Table 2-2: Median Income of Active Senior Households vs. All Households, 1997-2000 (dollars)
    • Most Earn Under $40,000 Per Annum
    • Table 2-3: Share of U.S. Adult Population by Household Income Bracket: By Age Grouping, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 10 Classifications
    • The Rich Get Richer
    • Net Worth Skyrockets
    • Table 2-4: Median Household Net Worth by Selected Age Group, 1989-1999 (dollars): From Age 45 to Age 75+
    • Fiscal Security Tempered by Healthcare Fears
    • Social Security: For Some, the Only Safety Net
    • Social Security's Shifting Politics
    • Poverty Among the Elderly

    Demographic Characteristics
    • Talking About My Generation
    • Lifestage as Important as Age
    • Active Senior Demographic Snapshot
    • The Gender Divide
    • Less Racially Diverse
    • Marital Status of Active Seniors
    • Many Are Widowed
    • Most Are Empty-Nesters
    • All Regions Home to Active Senior Residents
    • More Calling West, Southeast Home
    • Deep Roots Hold Most Seniors in Place
    • Half Are Suburban Dwellers
    • Single Family Homes Favored by Active Seniors
    • Home Ownership Very Important
    • Most Seniors Mortgage-Free
    • The Education Factor
    • Work and Retirement
    • Independent Seniors Favor Self-Employment
    • Table 2-5: Demographics of U.S. Adults Age 65-74: Selected Classifications, 2000 (number and percent): 27 Classifications
    • Table 2-6: Distribution of U.S. Adults by Gender: By Age Grouping, 2000 (number and percent)
    • Table 2-7: Share of U.S. Adult Population by Racial/Ethnic Origin: By Age Grouping, 2000 (% U.S. Adults): White, Black, Spanish/Hispanic, Asian, Other
    • Table 2-8: Share of U.S. Adult Population by Marital Status: By Age Grouping, 2000 (% U.S. Adults): 4 Classifications
    • Table 2-9: Share of U.S. Adult Population by Number of Persons in Household: By Age Grouping, 2000 (% U.S. Adults): 4 Classifications
    • Table 2-10: U.S. Adults in Households Without Children Present: By Age Grouping, 2000 (number and percent)
    • Table 2-11: Share of U.S. Adult Population by Region: By Age Grouping, 2000 (% U.S. Adults): South, Midwest, Northeast, West
    • Table 2-12: Share of U.S. Adult Population by Type of Residence: By Age Grouping, 2000 (% U.S. Adults): 3 Classifications
    • Table 2-13: Share of U.S. Adult Population by Kind of Residence: By Age Grouping, 2000 (% U.S. Adults): 3 Classifications
    • Table 2-14: Housing Tenure of Active Senior vs. Overall U.S. Households, 1999 (% U.S. Adults): 4 Classifications
    • Table 2-15: Share of U.S. Adult Population by Highest Level of Educational Attainment: By Age Grouping, 2000 (% U.S. Adults): 6 Classifications
    • Table 2-16: Share of U.S. Adult Population by Employment Status: By Age Grouping, 2000 (% U.S. Adults): 5 Classifications
    • Table 2-17: Share of U.S. Adult Population by Top Occupations: By Age Grouping, 2000 (% U.S. Adults): 6 Classifications

    Market Size and Growth
    • 2001 Active Senior Income $3.5 Trillion
    • Table 2-18: Active Senior Market Size and Growth: 1997-2006 (dollars): Number of Households, Average Household Income, Aggregate Income
    • Active Senior Market Approaches $4 Trillion in 2006
    • Shifting Attitudes Influence Today's Active Seniors
    • Here Come the Boomers
    • New Ideas About Work and Retirement
    • Boomers Will Work Longer
    • Skyrocketing Medical Care May Temper Market Growth
    • The Mindset of Fiscal Security

    Overview of Active Seniors as Consumers
    • Active Seniors Spend More Than They Earn
    • Grandparents Like to Spoil Their Grandchildren
    • Table 2-19: Average Annual Expenditures: Active Senior (Age 65-74) Households vs. Total U.S. Households, 1999 (% U.S. Adults): 16 Classifications
  3. Financial management
    Overview
    • Active Seniors a Strong Market for Financial Services
    • On Deck, Ikes and Boomers Will Think, Act Differently
    • Insurance Is Most Popular Financial Holding
    • Table 3-1: Percent of Adults Age 65-74 with Selected Types of Financial Accounts and Holdings, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 20 Classifications
    • Predatory Lending an Issue for Seniors and Marketers of Financial Services
    • Active Seniors Consider Estate Planning

    Active Seniors and Insurance
    • Nearly All Active Seniors Hold Some Type of Health Insurance
    • 82% Have Auto Insurance
    • Active Seniors Top Homeowners, Renters Insurance Holders
    • Table 3-2: Types of Insurance Accounts Held: Active Seniors vs. Selected Demographics, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 4 Classifications
    • 60% of Active Seniors Have Life Insurance
    • Table 3-3: Types of Life Insurance Accounts Held: Active Seniors vs. Selected Demographics, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 7 Classifications
    • A New Approach to Health Insurance
    • Long-Term Care Insurance
    • Immediate Care Single Premium Annuity Helps Ease Financial Crises
    • Seniors Biggest Purchasers of Viaticals
    • Celebrities Help Market Insurance to Seniors
    • Insurance a Hard Sell to Boomers in Denial

    Active Seniors and Credit Cards
    • Active Seniors Activate Charge Cards
    • Visa: Everywhere Active Seniors Want to Be
    • Department Store, Gasoline Cards Also Attract Active Seniors
    • Sears, American Express Are Stand-Out Cards
    • Table 3-4: Types of Credit Card Accounts Held: Active Seniors vs. Selected Demographics, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 19 Classifications
    • Table 3-5: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Financial Customers: By Types of Credit Cards Held, 2000 (number, percent, index): 13 Classifications

    Active Seniors and Banking
    • Over Half of Active Seniors Hold Savings Accounts
    • Table 3-6: Types of Savings Accounts Held: Active Seniors vs. Selected Demographics, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 6 Classifications
    • Full-Service Brokers Enjoy Strong Ownership Rates
    • Table 3-7: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Financial Customers: By Types of Savings Accounts Held, 2000 (number, percent, index): 4 Classifications
    • Thrifty Seniors Favor Interest-Bearing Checking Accounts
    • Two-Fifths Maintain Non-Interest Checking Accounts
    • Table 3-8: Types of Checking Accounts Held: Active Seniors vs. Selected Demographics, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 10 Classifications
    • Full-Service Brokers Attract Active Seniors as Interest- Bearing Checking Account Customers
    • Table 3-9: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Financial Customers: By Types of Checking Accounts Held, 2000 (number, percent, index): 5 Classifications
    • Seniors Want Personal Touch

    Active Seniors and Loans
    • Fewer Home Loans
    • Table 3-10: Types of First Mortgages Held: Active Seniors vs. Selected Demographics, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 4 Classifications
    • Reverse Mortgages Turn Finances Around
    • Active Seniors Take Fewer Car Loans
    • Table 3-11: Types of New Car Auto Loans: Active Seniors vs. Selected Demographics, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 4 Classifications

    Active Seniors and Investing
    • Largest Holders of IRAs, Brokerage Accounts, and Mutual Fund Accounts
    • Active Seniors More Prone to Hold IRAs
    • Leading Holders of Brokerage and Mutual Fund Accounts
    • Multiple Choices Work Best for Seniors
    • Active Seniors Bullish on Securities
    • Figure 3-1: Number of Adults Age 65-74 by Value of Securities Owned, 2000
    • Long-Term CDs the Most Popular Security
    • Active Seniors Are Long-Haul Investors
    • Figure 3-2: Number of Adults Age 65-74 by Number of Stock Transactions in Company Other than Employer in Last 12 Months, 2000
    • Boomers Trade Pensions for 401(k)s, Other Retirement Options
    • Table 3-12: Types of Individual Retirement, Brokerage, and Mutual Fund Accounts Held: Active Seniors vs. Selected Demographics, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 15 Classifications
    • Table 3-13: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Financial Customers: By Types of Individual Retirement, Brokerage, and Mutual Fund Accounts Held, 2000 (number, percent, index): 14 Classifications
    • Table 3-14: Types of Securities Held: Active Seniors vs. Selected Demographics, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 15 Classifications
  4. Home, Auto, leisure
    Overview
    • Active Seniors Have More Time for Leisure
    • Every Senior Generation Different
    • Seniors Give Freely of Their Time
    • Care-Giving: The Hidden Activity
    • Active Seniors Big on Dining Out, Music, Reading, Gardening
    • Table 4-1: Participation in Leisure Activities in Past 12 Months by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 28 Classifications
    • Table 4-2: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Leisure Participants: By Participation in Leisure Activities in Past 12 Months, 2000 (number, percent, index): 8 Classifications

    Dining Out and Live Entertainment
    • Active Seniors Like to Go Out to Eat
    • Restaurant Features Are Important
    • Aging Boomers Have Their Own Preferences
    • Favorite Senior Restaurants Include Denny's, Cracker Barrel
    • NEA Study Finds Fine Arts Audiences Grayer
    • Live Theatre, Classical Music at Top of List
    • Table 4-3: Dining Out in Family Restaurants in Past 12 Months by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 25 Classifications
    • Table 4-4: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Foodservice Customers: By Dining Out in Family Restaurants in Past 12 Months, 2000 (number, percent, index): 13 Classifications
    • Table 4-5: Attendance at Live Theater/Concert/Dance in Past 12 Months by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 7 Classifications
    • Table 4-6: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Performance Art Patrons: By Attendance at Live Theater/Concert/Dance in Past 12 Months, 2000 (number, percent, index): 3 Classifications

    Gardening, Birdwatching, and Collecting
    • Gardening Gets Active Seniors Out of Doors
    • Senior-Friendly Products Sprouting Up
    • Active Seniors Enthusiastic Vegetable Gardeners
    • Birdwatching Another Popular Pasttime
    • Coins, Crystal Figures Are Leading Collectibles
    • Table 4-7: Garden Supplies Purchased in Past 12 Months by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 16 Classifications
    • Table 4-8: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Gardeners: By Garden Supplies Purchased in Past 12 Months, 2000 (number, percent, index): 12 Classifications
    • Table 4-9: Collectibles Purchased for Self in Last 12 Month by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 7 Classifications
    • Table 4-10: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Collectibles Consumers: Collectibles Purchased for Self in Last 12 Months, 2000 (number, percent, index): 3 Classifications

    Vehicle Ownership Patterns
    • Older Drivers Drawn to Large Domestic Vehicles
    • Active Seniors Less Likely to Drive New Cars
    • Luxury Domestics Feeling the Heat from Imports
    • Older Car Buyers Look for Comfort, Convenience
    • Vehicle Feature Choices Reflect Active Seniors' Desire for Comfort, Convenience
    • Automakers Designing for Senior Drivers
    • Word-of-Mouth Matters in Car Purchasing Decisions
    • Older Buyers Like to Pay Cash
    • Table 4-11: Domestic or Foreign Model Type of Most Recently Acquired Vehicle by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 10 Classifications
    • Table 4-12: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Auto Consumers: By Model Type of Most Recently Acquired Vehicle, 2000 (number, percent, index): 4 Classifications
    • Table 4-13: Model Year Vehicle Owned by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 4 Classifications
    • Table 4-14: Features of Most Recently Acquired Vehicle by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 11 Classifications
    • Table 4-15: Product Information Sources for Vehicles Owned by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 7 Classifications
    • Table 4-16: Payment Method for Most Recently Acquired Vehicle: Selected Demographics, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 5 Classifications

    Use of Catalogs
    • Convenience, Selection a Major Draw
    • Active Seniors Are Big Catalog Shoppers
    • Good Looks, Sharp Contrast, Big Print
    • Popular Catalogs Feature Fashions, Furnishings
    • Music Is Sweet for Senior-Oriented Gold Violin
    • Table 4-17: Purchasing from Catalogs in Past 12 Months by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 24 Classifications
    • Table 4-18: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Catalog Customers: By Purchasing of Merchandise in Past 12 Months (number, percent, index): 13 Classifications
  5. Computers and communications
    Computers at Home
    • Ownership and Usage Rates Decline with Age
    • Compaq the Most Popular Brand
    • Table 5-1: Personal Computer Ownership by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 11 Classifications
    • Active Seniors Use Computers Far Less Than Younger Adults
    • Table 5-2: Hours Spent Weekly on Home Computer by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 6 Classifications
    • Favorite Activities Include Word Processing, Computer Games, E-mail
    • Table 5-3: Activities on Personal Computer by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 15 Classifications

    Online/Interactive Computer Services
    • Wired Seniors a Small But Ardent Group
    • Yet Many Seniors Shun Cyberworld
    • More Time to Surf
    • Table 5-4: Hours Spent Monthly on Interactive Computer Service by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 5 Classifications
    • E-mail Is Most Popular Interactive Activity
    • Table 5-5: Interactive Activities on Personal Computer by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 12 Classifications
    • Education the Key to Computer Literacy
    • Senior Surfer Ads Ride Humor Wave
    • Seniors Starting to Shop Online
    • eBay, Inc. Makes Bid for Online Senior Shoppers
    • Seniors Comprise Small Portion of Online Apparel Purchasers
    • Meeting Demand for Online Healthcare Information
    • Kaiser Permanente, Inova Woo SeniorSurfers
    • SeniorCo Hopes to Become "Trusted Reference"
    • Emerging Trend: Senior Cyber Cafes

    Telephones and Telephone Services
    • Telephones Are Senior Lifelines
    • Table 5-6: Number of Home Telephone Numbers by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 3 Classifications
    • Hearing Loss Affects Telephone Usage
    • Active Seniors Big on Cordless Phones, Answering Machines, and Amplifying Phones
    • Retail, Company Stores Preferred
    • Table 5-7: Telephone Equipment Owned by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 9 Classifications
    • Table 5-8: Telephone Equipment Bought in Last Year by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 8 Classifications
    • Table 5-9: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Communications Consumers: By Telephone Equipment Ownership and Purchasing, 2000 (number, percent, index): 6 Classifications
    • Fewer Active Seniors Use Calling Features
    • Table 5-10: Usage of Custom Telephone Services by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 7 Classifications
    • Thrifty Seniors Spend Less on Monthly Phone Bills
    • Table 5-11: Total Household Monthly Phone Bill by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 6 Classifications
    • Cellular Telephones:
    • Safety Issues Spur Use
    • 7 Million Active Seniors Have a Cellular Phone
    • Table 5-12: Usage of Cellular Phones by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 5 Classifications
    • Table 5-13: Monthly Cellular Phone Bill by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 2 Classifications
  6. Health and fitness
    Physical Health and Aging
    • Aging Brings Physical Changes
    • Active Seniors Share Graying, Thinning Hair
    • Active Senior Women in Post-Menopausal Stage
    • Viagra Takes On Impotency
    • Half of Elderly Experience Chronic Health Conditions
    • Broad, Niche Markets Targeted
    • Marketers Target Arthritis, Creaking Bones
    • High Cholesterol, Heart Health Also Targeted
    • Appealing to the Senses
    • Marketers Must Consider Physical Needs of Elderly
    • Lifestyle Images Proving Effective
    • Reaching Seniors In Person
    • Pharmacies a Senior Stronghold
    • Older Americans Living Longer, Healthier Lives

    Fitness and Fitness Facilities
    • Exercise Equals Good Health, But More Challenging to Older Bodies
    • Active Seniors Exercise Often
    • Table 6-1: Participation in Physical Fitness Programs by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 5 Classifications
    • Seniors Stay Active at Health Clubs
    • Emotional Support, Socializing Important
    • Health Clubs Adapt Facilities, Attitudes to Increase Senior Appeal

    Sports and Recreational Activities
    • Walking, Swimming Are Top Sports/Fitness Activities
    • Fitness Walking a Stand-Out Senior Sport
    • Active Seniors Tee Off
    • Senior Softball a Big Hit
    • Mall Walkers Mean Business
    • But Some Malls Find Walkers to Be Underfoot
    • Mall of America Does About-Face
    • Table 6-2: Participation in Sports/Fitness Activities in Last 12 Months by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 26 Classifications
    • Table 6-3: Participation in Favorite Sports by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 14 Classifications
    • Table 6-4: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Sports and Fitness Consumers: By Participation in Favorite Sports, 2000 (number, percent, index): 4 Classifications

    Recreational Equipment and Apparel
    • Active Seniors Tackle Fishing
    • Health Club Memberships Translate to Fitness Equipment Ownership
    • Retailers Target Fitness Market
    • Golf Merchandisers, Retailers Ignoring Seniors?
    • Sweat Shirts, Sweat Pants, and Swim Suits Are Top Women's Apparel Items
    • Exercise Walking Shoes Step Ahead
    • Table 6-5: Sporting Goods Owned by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 27 Classifications
    • Table 6-6: Selected Sporting Goods Purchased Last Year by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 4 Classifications
    • Table 6-7: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Sports and Fitness Consumers: By Sporting Goods Owned, 2000 (number, percent, index): 5 Classifications
    • Table 6-8: Purchasers of Women's Athletic Apparel in Last Year by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (Number of U.S. Adults): 6 Classifications
    • Table 6-9: Purchasers of Men's Athletic Apparel in Last Year by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (Number of U.S. Adults): 3 Classifications
    • Table 6-10: Sneakers/Athletic Shoes Purchased in Last Year by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 8 Classifications
    • Table 6-11: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Sports and Fitness Consumers: By Sneakers/Athletic Shoes Purchased in Last Year, 2000 (number, percent, index): 2 Classifications
  7. Travel and Vacation
    Overview
    • Active Seniors Love Leisure Travel
    • Variety of Factors Influence Travel Decisions
    • Political Events Impact Travel Industry, Senior Travel
    • Seniors Prefer Tours, Group Travel
    • Multigenerational Travel a Growing Trend
    • Disney Leads in Multigenerational Marketing
    • Other Marketers Also Target Traveling Grandparents
    • Fitness, Health Considerations an Important Priority
    • Eldertreks Offer "Soft Adventures"
    • Elderhostel Offers Learning Programs
    • Active Senior Women a Primary Target

    Foreign and Domestic Travel
    • Active Seniors Travel Outside Continental U.S.
    • 43% of Active Seniors Travel Outside Continental U.S.
    • One-Fifth of Active Seniors Travel by Plane Outside Continental U.S.
    • Senior Spending on Foreign Travel
    • 70% of Active Seniors Travel Within Continental U.S.
    • Nearly Half of Active Seniors Take Overnight Domestic Trips
    • One-Quarter of Active Seniors Take Domestic Vacation or Personal Plane Trips
    • Most Spend Under $500 on Domestic Trips
    • Delta, American the Most Popular Frequent Flyer Programs
    • On the Road: Use of RVs by Seniors on the Rise
    • Table 7-1: Round Trips Taken Outside Continental U.S. in Last 3 Years by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 6 Classifications
    • Table 7-2: Plane Trips Taken Outside Continental U.S. in Last 3 Years by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 6 Classifications
    • Table 7-3: Personal/Vacation Plane Trips Taken Outside Continental U.S. in Last 3 Years by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 6 Classifications
    • Table 7-4: Total Amount Spent on Last Trip Taken Outside Continental U.S. by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 4 Classifications
    • Table 7-5: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Travel Consumers: By Total Amount Spent on Last Trip Taken Outside Continental U.S., 2000 (number, percent, index): 2 Classifications
    • Table 7-6: Round Trips Taken Inside Continental U.S. in Last 3 Years by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 9 Classifications
    • Table 7-7: Overnight Round Trips Taken Inside Continental U.S. in Last 3 Years by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 9 Classifications
    • Table 7-8: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Travel Consumers: By Overnight Round Trips Taken Within Continental U.S. in Last 3 Years, 2000 (number, percent, index): 4 Classifications
    • Table 7-9: Personal/Vacation Plane Trips Taken Within Continental U.S. in Last 3 Years by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 5 Classifications
    • Table 7-10: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Travel Consumers: By Personal/Vacation Plane Trips Taken Within Continental U.S. in Last 3 Years, 2000 (number, percent, index): 2 Classifications
    • Table 7-11: Total Amount Spent on Last Trip Taken Within Continental U.S. by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 6 Classifications
    • Table 7-12: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Travel Consumers: By Total Amount Spent on Last Trip Taken Within Continental U.S., 2000 (number, percent, index): 3 Classifications
    • Table 7-13: Enrollment in Frequent Flyer Program by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 8 Classifications
    • Table 7-14: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Travel Consumers: By Enrollment in Frequent Flyer Program, 2000 (number, percent, index): 4 Classifications

    Hotels, Motels, Resorts
    • Active Seniors Checking In
    • Hotels, Motels Offer Senior Programs
    • Over Half of Active Seniors Stay in Domestic Hotel/Motel
    • Mid-Range, Economy Chains Appeal to Active Seniors
    • Resorts for Senior Sports
    • Table 7-15: Personal/Vacation Trip Stays in Hotels/Motels Within Continental U.S. in Last 12 Months by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 8 Classifications
    • Table 7-16: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Travel Consumers: By Personal/Vacation Trip Stays in Hotels/Motels Within Continental U.S. in Last 12 Months, 2000 (number, percent, index): 3 Classifications
    • Table 7-17: Hotels/Motels Chosen for Personal/Vacation Trips Within Continental U.S. in Last 12 Months by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 15 Classifications
    • Table 7-18: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Travel Consumers: By Hotels/Motels Chosen for Personal/Vacation Trips Within Continental U.S. in Last 12 Months, 2000 (number, percent, index): 12 Classifications

    Cruise Ship Vacations
    • Cruising Seniors Take to the Waterways
    • Older Travelers Choose to Cruise
    • Caribbean, Alaska, Mexico Among Top Destinations
    • Cruise Lines Chosen Include Holland America, Royal Caribbean
    • Marketers on Cruise Control
    • Marketing Strategies Focus on Luxury—and Value
    • Table 7-19: Cruise Ship Vacations Taken in Last 3 Years by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 4 Classifications
    • Table 7-20: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Travel Consumers: By Cruise Ship Vacations Taken in Last 3 Years, 2000 (number, percent, index): 3 Classifications
    • Table 7-21: Destinations Chosen for Cruise Ship Vacations in Last 3 Years by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 3 Classifications
    • Table 7-22: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Travel Consumers: By Destination Chosen for Cruise Ship Vacations in Last 3 Years, 2000 (number, percent, index): 3 Classifications
    • Table 7-23: Lines Chosen for Cruise Ship Vacations in Last 3 Years by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 4 Classifications
    • Table 7-24: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Travel Consumers: By Lines Chosen for Cruise Ship Vacations in Last 3 Years, 2000 (number, percent, index): 3 Classifications

    Casino Gambling
    • Active Seniors Bet on Casino Gambling
    • Top Destinations Include Reservations, Las Vegas
    • Casinos Woo Seniors
    • Seniors View Gambling as Entertainment
    • Table 7-25: Casino Gambling Excursions in Last 12 Months by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 5 Classifications
    • Table 7-26: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Travel Consumers: By Casino Gambling Excursions in Last 12 Months, 2000 (number, percent, index): 3 Classifications
    • Table 7-27: Casino Gambling Destinations in Last 12 Months by Age Grouping: 18-64, 65-74, and 75+, 2000 (% of U.S. Adults): 7 Classifications
    • Table 7-28: Adults Age 65-74 as Prime Travel Consumers: By Casino Gambling Destinations in Last 12 Months, 2000 (number, percent, index): 6 Classifications

    Appendix I: examples of consumer advertising
    Appendix II: addresses of selected marketers

Abstract:

This report examines the U.S. market for active seniors, defined as consumers age 65-74. As more and more Americans age into this demographic and remain healthier and active longer, marketers are increasingly paying more attention to this older, "pre-Boomer" segment of the mature market—which is defined by distinctly different needs, lifestyles, and attitudes than its younger or older counterparts. Relying on government data and Simmons Market Research Bureau primary research on consumer purchasing, ownership, and product usage patterns, the report contrasts the consumer-oriented interests, actions, and lifestyle issues of this group with those of conventionally working age adults, the young mature (age 55-64), and the elderly (age 75+). It provides key data and analysis on overall market size and growth, as well as focus sections on Financial Management; Computers and Communications; Home, Auto, and Leisure; Sports and Fitness; and Travel and Vacation.

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