The U.S. Mature Market

Published: Jun 1, 2000 - 290 Pages

Table of Contents:

  1. Executive Summary
    Scope and Methodology
      Mature Market Defined as Those Age 55 and Over
      Report Methodology

    Demographics

      Mature Market Begins at 55
      Within Mature Market, Three Distinct Lifestages
      Nearly 58 Million Americans Age 55-Plus
      Table 1-1: Projected Growth of U.S. Mature Population, 1999-2050 (number): From Age 55 to Age 80+
      Through 2050, Mature Population Will Be Fastest-Growing
      Geographic Distribution of Mature Population by State
      Median Income Averages $32,448 in 1998
      Mature Americans Enjoy Higher Living Standards than Any Eld-erly Generation in History
      More High School Graduates Among Today's Elderly
      College Graduates Also Increasing
      Most Elderly Live in Family Setting
      Most Americans View Aging in Positive Light

    The Market

      1999 Market Nears $1.1 Trillion
      Housing Is Mature Americans' Top-Spending Category
      Figure 1-1: Aggregate Annual Household Expenditures in Se-lected Categories by Mature Americans Age 55+, 1999 (dollars): 10 Categories
      Mature Population Growth Is Major Impetus
      Boomers Will Continue to Earn and Spend
      Americans Age 65-69 Allowed to Work Full-Time Without Sacri-ficing Retirement Benefits
      Grandparents a Growing Market Force
      Internet May Mean Add-on Sales

    Mature Americans As Consumers

      Overall Spending Patterns Reflect Lifestyle Changes Associated with Aging
      55- to 64-Year-Olds Spend More Than Average in Many Categories
      Retiree Spending Reflects the Good Life
      Generalizations Cloud Spending Patterns of Those 75-Plus
      Aggregate Household Expenditures: Housing Is Top Mature Spending Category
      Mature Americans Drive Growth in Many Products and Services
      Shopping Patterns Vary by Age and Retirement
      Mature Shoppers Rate Certain Stores Highly

    Mature Americans' Use of Media

      Mature Adults Are Prime Consumers of Media
      Television Is Window to World for Oldest Americans
      Networks Overlook Older Viewers When Programming TV
      Mature Viewers Turing to Cable
      Mature Listeners Find Nostalgic Appeal in Radio
      Mature-Oriented Magazines Flourishing
      Mature Consumers Appreciate Convenience of Home Shopping
      Mature Americans Jumping Online

    Marketing to Mature Americans

      Mature Market Still Not Given Its Due
      But Marketers Are Making Progress
      Mature Americans a Challenging Target
      Maturing Boomers Will Break the Mold

  2. Demographics
    Overview
      Mature Market Begins at 55
      Within Mature Market, Three Distinct Lifestages
      Mature Market Worth Over $1.0 Trillion in 1999
      Figure 2-1: Projected Growth of Mature Population, 1999-2050 (number): Age 55-64, Age 65-79, Age 80+

    Population

      Nearly 58 Million Americans Age 55-Plus
      "Working Mature" Includes Those Age 55-64
      65- to 79-Year-Olds Are "Young Retirees"
      Those 80 and Over Comprise America's Elderly
      Table 2-1: Projected Growth of U.S. Mature Population, 1999-2050 (number): From Age 55 to Age 80+
      Centenarians On the Rise
      Table 2-2: Projected Growth of U.S. Population Age 100 and Older by Gender: Male vs. Female, 1999-2050 (number)
      Americans Enjoying Longer Life Expectancy
      Through 2050, Mature Population Will Be Fastest-Growing
      Table 2-3: Projected Growth of U.S. Population Age 55+ vs. Age Under 18, 1999-2050 (number and percent)
      "Lifestage" a More Important Indicator Than Age
      Females Increasingly Outnumber Males with Age
      Table 2-4: Percentage of Mature Population by Age and Gender, 1999 (number and percent): From Age 55 to Age 80+
      Although Whites Dominate, Mature Population Becoming More Diverse with Time
      Table 2-5: Mature Americans Age 55+ by Race, 1999 vs. 2004 (percent): 5 Races/Ethnic Groups
      Mature Population Spread Out Regionally
      Table 2-6: Percentage of Households: By Geographic Distribu-tion and Age of Householder, 1998 (percent): United States, Northeast, Midwest, South, West
      Most Populous States Have Most Persons Age 55 and Over
      Half of Those Age 65-Plus Concentrated in Handful of States
      Geographic Distribution of Mature Population by State
      Table 2-7: Geographic Distribution of Mature Population Age 55+ by State, 1998 (percent)
      West, Southeast Regions Experience Growth in Elderly Between 1990 and 1998
      West, Southeast Regions Will Continue to Grow in Popularity
      Mountain States Lead in Growth Projections
      Table 2-8: Projected Growth of Mature Population Age 65+ by State, 2000-2025 (number and percent)
      Large-Scale Rural Retirement May Prove a Catch-22
      By Metro Area, Southern Florida Still Tops
      Many Mature Americans Prefer to "Age in Place," But Relocation Also Holds Appeal

    Employment and Economic Status

      Mature Americans Are Country's Wealthiest Asset Holders
      Median Income Averages $32,448 in 1998
      27% of Mature Households Earn $50,000 or More
      Table 2-9: U.S. Mature Households Age 55+ by Income Level, 1998 (number and percent)
      Most Mature Americans Are Homeowners and Mortgage-Free
      Table 2-10: Housing Tenure of Mature vs. Overall U.S. House-holds, 1998 (percent): 4 Categories
      Empty-Nesters Have More Disposable Income
      Mature Americans Enjoy Higher Living Standards than Any Eld-erly Generation in History
      Poverty Among the Elderly
      Minorities, Women, and Singles Fare Far Worse Than Whites, Married Couples
      Women More Dependent Than Men on Social Security
      More Mature Ignoring Traditional Retirement Age
      More Mature Workers Expected in U.S. Labor Pool
      Table 2-11: Percentage of Mature Americans Age 55+: Labor Force Participation by Gender, 1998-2008 (percent)
      Americans Age 65-69 Now Allowed to Work Full-Time Without Sacrificing Retirement Benefits
      Retirement Patterns Differ Among Occupations
      Self-Employment Likely to Increase Among Mature Americans
      Women More Likely to Have Pensions in Future
      Many Boomers Will Continue Working
      Financial Concerns Grow with Age
      Boomer Retirement: Who Will Pay?
      More Employer-Sponsored Retiree Income in the Future
      Economics of Traditional Healthcare, Social Security
      Changing Concept of Life Cycles

    Education

      More High School Graduates Among Today's Elderly
      College Graduates Also Increasing
      Future Mature Market Growth Supported by Higher Education Levels

    Family Status

      Most 55- to 64-Year-Olds Married
      Table 2-12: Marital Status of Mature Americans by Age, 1998 (percent): From Age 55 to Age 85+, All U.S. 18+
      Younger Children Still Present in Some Mature Households
      Grandparents a Growing Market Force
      Nearly 4 Million Grandparents Find Themselves Raising a Second Generation
      Grandparent-Maintained Families Up 76%
      Grandparent-Run Families More Likely to Be Poor
      Child-Rearing Second Time Around Financially, Emotionally Stressful
      Legal Rights Problematic for Custodial Grandparents
      One in Five Grandparents Are Step-Grandparents

    Living Arrangements

      Most Elderly Live in Family Setting
      More Elderly Women Than Men Live Alone
      Living Alone vs. Loneliness
      Mature Americans and Driving: Safety a Major Concern

    Health Issues

      Aging Accompanied by Physical Changes
      Graying Hair, Hair Loss Affects Nearly All Mature Americans
      For Women, Menopause Cues End of Youth
      For Men, Sexual Function Often Reduced
      Half of Elderly Experience Chronic Health Conditions
      Major Health Concerns and Conditions Among the Mature and Elderly
      Arthritis
      Heart Disease
      High Blood Pressure
      Hearing Loss
      Weakening Eyesight
      Orthopedic Impairment
      Oral Health
      Diminished Skin Thickness, Elasticity
      Loss of Sensitivity to Touch
      Slowed Reflexes, Mental Agility
      Depression
      Alzheimer's Disease
      Prostate Cancer
      Exercise More Important Than Ever, But More Challenging to Older Bodies
      Medical Costs Skyrocket for Older Americans
      Care for the Elderly Often Falls on Family
      Nursing Home Care Costly, Fraught with Red Tape
      Home Healthcare, Hospice Care Growing
      New Drug Therapies Abound, But Geriatric Medication a Complex Field
      Better Health Through Technology for Tomorrow's Elderly
      Technological Advancements Increase Elderly Independence

    Psychographics

      Mature Market Segmented by Age, Generational Experiences
      Three Distinct Age Segments
      Working Mature
      Young Retirees
      Elderly
      Other Experts Segment Market Differently
      Mature Americans Also Segmented by Birth Cohorts
      The Four Birth Cohorts
      Elderly Stereotypes Based on Depression Cohort
      World War II Segment United by War, Victory
      Post-War Cohort: Bridge to the Baby Boom
      Here They Come: Boomers I Represent First Wave
      Mature Americans, Especially Women, Concerned with Appearance
      Men Also Find Aging Stressful
      Mature Mindset: Think Ten Years Younger
      Later Years a Time for Fulfillment
      Seniors Gaining in Computer Savvy
      Seniors Give Time, Money to Charity
      With Maturity Comes Wisdom
      Mature Consumers Driven by Internal, Not External Motivators
      Most Americans View Aging in Positive Light

  3. The Market
    Market Size and Growth
      1999 Market Nears $1.1 Trillion
      Market Has Grown More Than 20% Since 1995
      Table 3-1: Estimated Size of Mature Market by Age Group, 1999 (# of households, average after-tax income, total income): From Age 55 to Age 75+
      Bulk of Mature Wealth Is in Under-65 Segment
      Figure 3-1: Share of Mature Market by Age Group, 1999 (percent): Age 55-64, Age 65-74, Age 75+
      Americans 65-74 Have $303 Billion in Aggregate Income
      Americans 75 and Over Worth $209 Billion
      Table 3-2: Growth of Mature Market by Age Group, 1995-1999 (dollars): From Age 55 to Age 75+
      Housing Is Mature Americans' Top-Spending Category
      Figure 3-2: Aggregate Annual Household Expenditures in Selected Categories by Mature Americans Age 55+, 1999 (dollars): 10 Categories
      Four-Fifths of U.S. Assets in Mature Hands
      Table 3-3: Percent Owning and Median Value of Selected Assets by Age of Householder, 1993 (percent): Motor Vehicles, Homes, Interest-Bearing Accounts, IRA/KEOGH, Stocks/Mutual Fund Shares

    Factors to Market Growth

      Mature Population Growth Is Major Impetus
      Figure 3-3: Mature Population by Age Group: 1999 vs. 2004 (number): Age 55-64, Age 65-79, Age 80+
      Boomers Will Continue to Earn and Spend
      Mature American Investment Income Likely to Grow
      Figure 3-4: Average Household Income from Investments: Mature vs. All U.S. Households, 1998 (dollars): Age 55-64, Age 65-74, Age 75+, All Households
      World War II and Post-War Americans Replacing Depression-Era Seniors
      Congress Likely to Amend Social Security and Medicare
      Americans Age 65-69 Allowed to Work Full-Time Without Sacrificing Retirement Benefits
      More Employer-Sponsored Retiree Income in the Future
      Mature Homeowners Cashing in on Their Homes
      Grandparents a Growing Market Force
      Internet May Mean Add-on Sales
      Figure 3-5: Aggregate Income of Mature Americans Age 55+, 1999-2004 (dollars)

    Projected Market Growth

      Market to Grow 29% in Next Five Years
      Table 3-4: Projected Growth of Mature Market Age 55+, 1995-2004 (dollars): Number of Households, Average Household Income, Aggregate Income

  4. Mature Americans As Consumers
    Spending on Consumer Products and Services
      Notes on Consumer Expenditure Survey Data
      Overall Spending Patterns Reflect Lifestyle Changes Associated with Aging
      55- to 64-Year-Olds Spend More Than Average in Many Categories
      Group Spending Reflects "Split Personality" of Eisenhower Generation
      Retiree Spending Reflects the Good Life
      Generalizations Cloud Spending Patterns of Those 75-Plus
      Elderly Spend Disproportionately on Healthcare
      ...And on Cash Gifts
      and on Personal Care
      But Financial Concerns Moderate Senior Spending
      Aggregate Household Expenditures: Housing Is Top Mature Spending Category
      Mature Americans Drive Growth in Many Products and Services
      Table 4-1: Average Annual Household Expenditures by Mature Americans: By Age of Householder, 1998 (dollars): 15 Categories
      Table 4-2: Aggregate Annual Household Expenditures on Selected Items by Mature Americans, 1998 (dollars): 15 Categories

    Mature Consumers of Housing

      Plenty of Choices
      Why Mature Americans Relocate
      Two Age Distinctions in Active Senior Communities
      Housing Developers Rethinking the Market
      Lower-Cost Housing Options
      Attached Housing and "Seniors-Only" Apartments
      Mobile Home Communities
      ECHO Housing
      Other Types of Senior Housing Are Service-Oriented
      Assisted Living Industry Responding to America's Growing Need for Long-Term Care
      Lifecare and Continuing Care Communities
      Senior Short-Term Housing
      Housing-Related Service Costs Rise with Age
      Table 4-3: Average Household Expenditures by Mature Americans on Household Operations: By Age of Householder, 1998 (dollars): 5 Categories

    Mature Consumers of Food & Beverages

      An $86 Billion Category
      Table 4-4: Average Household Expenditures by Mature Americans on Food Eaten at Home: By Age of Householder, 1998 (dollars): 16 Categories
      Mature a Key Market for Nutritional Supplements
      Table 4-5: Average Household Expenditures by Mature Americans on Non-Prescription Vitamins: By Age of Householder, 1998 (dollars)
      Mature Consumers Enjoy Eating Out
      Mature Consumers Like to Eat Out with Grandkids

    Mature Consumers of Healthcare Services

      A $92 Billion Market
      Table 4-6: Average Household Expenditures by Mature Americans on Healthcare: By Age of Householder, 1998 (dollars): 8 Categories
      Where Senior Healthcare Dollars Go
      Medicare Not All-Inclusive
      Congress Considers Strengthening Medicare
      HMOs Reconsider Medicare Market
      HMOs Scrambling to Accommodate Aging Boomers
      Trusted Physician Important to Mature Healthcare Consumers
      Prescription Drugs for the Mature a $20 Billion Market

    Mature Consumers of Apparel

      Clothing Draws Lukewarm Response from Mature Consumers
      Table 4-7: Average Household Expenditures by Mature Americans on Apparel: By Age of Householder, 1998 (dollars): 5 Categories
      Body Proportions, Tastes Change with Age
      Apparel Purveyors May Be Missing the Boat

    Mature Consumers of Vehicles

      Consumers Age 55-64 Spend More Than Average on New Vehicles; Motorcycles Big with Those Age 65-74
      Table 4-8: Average Household Expenditures by Mature Americans on Vehicles: By Age of Householder, 1998 (dollars): 6 Categories
      New J.D. Power Study Sheds Light on Car Buyers Over 50

    Mature Consumers of Financial Services

      Mature Adults Outspend Other Age Groups Across Most Financial Categories
      Table 4-9: Average Household Expenditures by Mature Americans on Financial Services: By Age of Householder, 1998 (dollars): 3 Categories
      Mature Consumers the Largest Beneficiaries of Investment Income
      Table 4-10: Average Household Income from Investments: By Age of Householder, 1998 (dollars): 4 Categories
      Figure 4-1: Average Household Income from Investments: Mature vs. All U.S. Households, 1998 (dollars): Age 55-64, Age 65-74, Age 75+, All Households
      Age Wave Statistics Confirm Mature Wealth
      Where Mature Americans Invest Their Money
      What the Over-60 Crowd Is Doing About Their Finances
      Differences Among Upscale Financial Service Consumers
      Insurance Industry Developing New Lifecycle Models
      Marketers of Financial Services Emphasize "Nest-Egg Management" for the Mature
      Over-50 Crowd Represents Half of U.S. Credit Card Holders

    Mature Consumers of Gifts

      Mature Americans Age 55-64 Second Only to Boomers in Expenditures on Gifts
      Table 4-11: Average Household Expenditures by Mature Americans on Gifts: By Age of Householder, 1998 (dollars): 8 Categories
      Grandchildren Are Major Recipients of Mature Largesse
      Elderly Give Cash Instead of Goods and Services

    Mature Consumers of Household Furnishings and Equipment

      Mature Consumers Spend More Than Average Across Most Household Categories
      Mature Americans Age 55-64 Spend More Than Average on Computers
      Table 4-12: Average Household Expenditures by Mature Americans on Household Furnishings and Equipment: By Age of Householder, 1998 (dollars): 10 Categories
      Assistive Living Products Moving Into Mainstream
      User-Friendly Utilities Extend to Computer Devices

    Mature Consumers of Travel and Entertainment

      Mature Americans Age 55-65 Spend More Than Average Across All Travel Categories
      Table 4-13: Average Travel-Related Household Expenditures by Mature Americans: By Age of Householder, 1998 (dollars): 4 Categories
      More Detailed Data Suggest a $37 Billion Mature Travel Market
      Table 4-14: Aggregate Travel-Related Household Expenditures by Mature Americans: By Age of Householder, 1998 (dollars): 9 Categories
      Travel One of Few Industries to Court Mature Consumers
      Mature Travelers Outspend Younger Counterparts
      Group Travel and All-Inclusive Packages Preferred
      Cruises Also Popular
      New Learning Experiences, Security, and Reliability Are Key Travel Appeals
      Adventure Travel Continues to Enjoy Strong Draw Among Mature Americans
      Trips with Grandkids
      Mature Travel Opportunities, Deals Abound on Internet
      Pre-Retirees Spend Disproportionately on Entertainment
      Table 4-15: Average Household Expenditures by Mature Americans on Entertainment: By Age of Householder, 1998 (dollars): 10 Categories
      Mature Americans Big on Sports and Fitness
      Indoor Activities Hold Increasing Appeal

    Mature Consumers of Funeral Services

      Mature Spend Most on Burial and Funeral Services
      Table 4-16: Average Household Expenditures by Mature Americans on Funeral Expenses: By Age of Householder, 1998 (dollars): 2 Categories
      Growth in Mature Population Means Growth in Funeral Services Industry
      More Consumers Choosing Cremation
      More Boomers Opt for Direct Casket Purchase
      Funeral Service Trends

    Shopping Patterns

      Mature Consumers Have Mixed Emotions About Shopping
      Older Consumers Shop Less
      Boomers May Change Things, However
      Shopping Patterns Vary by Age and Retirement
      Service an Important Part of Value
      Personal Relationships Important to Mature Customers
      Small Indulgences Appreciated
      Mature Americans Not Averse to Switching Brands
      Over One-Third of Catalog Shoppers Are Over 50
      Mature Americans Already Shopping the Net

    At the Retail Level

      Most Stores Still Not Cashing in on Over-55 Crowd
      Mature Shoppers Value Different Qualities in Retailer
      Qualities That Appeal to Mature Shoppers Also Appreciated by Shoppers in General
      Proper Use of Lighting and Signage Is Essential
      Senior Discounts Not the Draw Many Think
      Mature Shoppers Rate Certain Stores Highly
      Drugstores Score Big with Mature Consumers, and Not Just for Pharmaceuticals
      Appealing to Older Shoppers
      Drug Chains Wooing Mature Market
      Online Drugstores
      Discount Stores Emphasize Value, Amenities
      Wal-Mart's Appeal More Organic
      Kmart and Senior Network Join Forces
      Grocers Move to Accommodate Older Consumers
      What Mature Shoppers Value in Grocery Stores
      Grocers Capitalize on Home Meal Replacements
      Grandparents "R" Us
      Retailer Trend Profile: Overseas Adventure Travel
      Direct Marketing Gives Travelers a Taste of Adventure
      Trips Rated According to Degree of Difficulty
      Travelers Can Extend Their Stay
      Retailer Trend Profile: Yes I Can, "The Store Where Anything Is Possible"

  5. Mature Americans' Use of Media
    Overview
      Mature Adults Are Prime Consumers of Media

    Television

      Television Is Window to World for Oldest Americans
      News, Movies, Sports Most Frequently Watched
      Mature Viewers Enjoy Classic Themes
      Networks Overlook Older Viewers When Programming TV
      Networks Charge More for Younger-Skewing Shows
      Mature Network Viewers Favor CBS
      CBS Airs Nine of Top Ten Favorite Shows
      Advertisers Aiming at Smaller Target
      Advertisers Believe Mature Viewers Are Watching Anyway
      "Entrenched Stereotypes" Hard to Dispel
      Mature Americans Do Try New Brands
      Mature Consumers Represent 20-Plus Year Income Stream
      Broad Age Definitions by Networks Ineffective
      Mature Viewers Turing to Cable
      Leading Cable Channels Include Financial, Classic Programming
      A&E and History Channel Offer Mature-Friendly Programming

    Radio

      Three-Quarters of Mature Americans Listen Daily
      Mature Listeners Find Nostalgic Appeal in Radio
      Mature Listeners Head to the Country
      Chicago-Area Station Finds Success with Oldies Mix

    Print

      Older Americans Are Avid Readers
      Older Consumers Trust Print Ads the Most
      Mature-Oriented Magazines Flourishing
      Various Organizations Publish Magazines for Mature Readers
      Some Publishers Offer Mature Versions
      Best-Known Mature Magazine Is Modern Maturity
      Reader's Digest Targets Mature Readers
      Women Over 40 Want more
      Kiplinger's Retirement Report

    Direct Mail

      Mature Consumers Appreciate Convenience of Home Shopping
      Aging Boomers Want Style, Ease
      Mature Shoppers Prefer Upscale, Interest-Driven Catalogs
      Catalog Marketers Clamor for Lists
      Mature Consumers Read Direct Mail
      Salutations Important to Older Readers
      Newsletter Format Adds Value to Mailings
      Several Tries May Be Needed
      Carol Wright Gets Facelift
      Senior Mail Delivers to Mature Readers

    Electronic Media

      Mature Americans Jumping Online
      Mature Consumers Are Heavier Internet Users
      Favorite Sites of Older Americans
      Internet Inspires Drive Towards Integrated Media
      Mature Adults Use Computers for Practical Activities
      Internet a Tool, Not a Toy
      Eye on Net-Savvy Seniors
      SeniorNet: An Electronic Forum for the Mature Market
      AARP Offers Informative Website
      Seniors Enjoy Ease of WebTV
      Online Media Set to Boom

  6. Marketing To Mature Americans
    Marketing Fundamentals
      Mature Market Still Not Given Its Due
      But Marketers Are Making Progress
      Inclusive Approach Is More Effective
      CohortsNot Age Groups
      Lifestage Matrix Marketing's Four Birth Cohorts
      Center for Mature Consumer Studies Casts Another Light on Cohorts
      Five Key Values Drive Mature Consumer Behavior
      Autonomy and Self-Sufficiency
      Social and Spiritual Connectedness
      Altruism
      Personal Growth
      Revitalization
      Classic McDonald's Ad Hits the Mark
      Delivering Intended Message Calls for Finesse
      Ads Reflecting Mature Values Need Not Picture Target Audience at All
      Over-Reliance on Grandparenting Theme Can Cause Ad to Get Lost in the Clutter
      Effective Images Speak Volumes
      "Timeless" Connotations Hold Strong Appeal
      Humor in Advertising: Avoid Negative Stereotypes; Gentle Approach Plays Best
      Mature Adults Appreciate Contemporary Role Models
      Mature Market Likely to Resist Pat Labels
      Slang Is Out, Good Grammar Is In
      Building Relationships Is Important
      Slower-Paced Commercials Better Suited to Mature Audiences
      Yet Mature Will Work to Understand Ads
      Maturing Boomers Will Break the Mold
      Mature Americans a Challenging Target
      Examples of Advertising

    Examples of Advertising: Housing

      Lifestyle Focus Is Major Appeal
      The Villages Offers "Millionaire Lifestyle" on Fixed Income
      Oak Run Tells Retirees, "Your Best Is Yet to Come!"
      Plantation at Leesburg Emphasizes Value
      Malta Park Relieves Worried Minds
      States and Cities Also Court Retirees

    Examples of Advertising: Healthcare Services

      Budget Reconciliation Act Puts Damper on National Health Plan Advertising
      Pharmaceutical Companies Target Mature Consumers
      A Wide Variety of Drugs Advertised
      Autonomy, Social Connectedness Are Major Themes
      Recent Viagra Ads More Product-Focused
      Senior Network, Kmart Team Up for Diabetes Education
      Rexall Sundown Positions Osteo-Bi-Flex as Part of Healthy, Active Lifestyle

    Examples of Advertising: Food and Beverages

      General-Market Advertising Inclusive of Mature
      Kellogg's Advertising Spans Generations
      Arnold Palmer a Spokesman for Wheaties
      Quaker Oats Also Does Well with Mature Audience
      Del Monte Emphasizes Packaging
      Folgers and Maxwell House Target Mature Consumers
      Ensure Withstands Critics, Takes Multi-Generational Approach
      Milk Scores Big with Humorous Spot
      Red Lobster and Olive Garden Appeal to All Ages

    Examples of Advertising: Automobiles

      Few Memorable Ads in Recent Years
      Chevy Suburban Ads Pack Nostalgia Appeal
      How Saturn Established Itself Among Mature Consumers
      Nissan Banks on Mature Consumer Values

    Examples of Advertising: Financial Services

      Peace of Mind a Common Theme
      Conseco Addresses Concern for Surviving Family Members
      Other Marketers Touch Upon Altruistic Concerns
      MasterCard Advertising Reflects Mature Values
      Charles Schwab Advertising Appeals to Boomers
      Lincoln Financial Group Also Targets Boomers
      E*Trade Focuses on Fun
      AARP's Visa Card Offers Connections

    Examples of Advertising: Travel and Entertainment

      Mature Consumers a Key Target Market
      Overseas Adventure's Catalogs Are Effective
      Best Western Emphasizes Joy of Travel from Mature Perspective
      Holland America Advertises Luxury Cruises
      Value a Heavily Featured Theme
      Auto Rental Ads Feature Active Mature
      Few Other Entertainment Companies Target Mature on National Scale

    Examples of Advertising: Personal Care Products

      Cybil Shepherd Touts Revlon's Ultima II
      Oil of Olay Promises "Lifetime of Beautiful Skin"
      Comfort Bath Marketer Includes, Doesn't Target, Mature
      Autonomy and Self-Sufficiency Themes Help to Warm Mature Consumers to Assistive Listening Devices

    Appendix I: Advertisements. This appendix appears in bound editions only.

    Appendix II: Addresses of Selected Marketers

Abstract:

This updated report provides detailed insight into the motivations, aspirations and challenges of the nation's 58 million adults who are 55 and older. The report documents the unprecedented growth of this population group, explains the similarities and differences in its three distinct segments and provides detailed coverage of the surprising consumer behavior of this mostly affluent group. The report includes statistics on wealth, education, marital status, healthcare issues, living arrangements, housing options, travel preferences, media consumption and consumer expenditures in categories ranging from gifts to groceries. Just as important, the report examines the changing values that motivate behavior, as well as the cultural imprinting that serves as cues for reaching different generations of mature consumers. The report also presents examples of advertising campaigns that successfully target their intended mature or senior audiences.

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