The Mature Market: Consumer Trends and U.S. Retail Markets

Published: Mar 1, 2007 - 302 Pages

Table of Contents:

Chapter 1: Executive Summary
  • Scope and Methodology
    • Scope of Report
    • Report Methodology

  • Demographics
    • Increased Lifespans Accompany Improved Quality of Life
    • Mature Adults Retain a Youthful Outlook
    • Boomers Force Marketers to Anticipate Needs of Aging Population
    • Mature Adults Are the Fastest-Growing Demographic
    • Adults 50+ Wield Significant Spending Power
    • Frail Older Adults Still Vulnerable

  • Lifestyle, Health, and Wellness
    • Fitness Possible at Any Age
    • Medical and Tech Solutions in High Demand
    • Socializing + Exercise = A Winning Combination
    • Fastest-Growing Health Club Memberships Are 55+
    • Physically Active Adults Especially Attuned to Nutrition, Health Figure 1-1
    • Selected High Index Activities/Attitudes Among Mature Market Adults Who Participate in Exercise/Physical Fitness Activities 3 or More Times Weekly, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)

  • Personal Finance and Home Ownership
    • Mature Adults Experiencing Greater Economic Well-Being
    • Mature Clients Require Personalized Financial Strategies
    • Mature Workers Keep Working; Employers Court Experience
    • Generation Gap is Out; Financial Gap is In
    • Many Worry Retirement Savings Wont Meet Future Needs
    • Home Ownership Linked with Financial Comfort
    • Low-Risk Investments Popular Among Mature Cohort

  • Internet and Telecommunications
    • Comfort Level Reflects Mature Age Segment, Experience
    • Despite Converging Generational Values, Tech Gap Remains
    • Mature Market Adults Under Age 70 Lead Online Growth
    • Mature Market Computer Use Parallels Online Status

  • Travel, Transportation, and Entertainment
    • Drivers License Central to Mature Adults Work, Leisure Pursuits
    • Loss of Driving Capability Detracts from Independence, Quality of Life
    • Mature Adults Prefer Many Safety Features in Cars
    • Drivers Over Age 65 to Double by 2030
    • Mature Adults Likely to Buy Cars New, Opt for Amenities
    • Figure 1-2: Selected High and Low Index Mature Market Demographics for Activities and Attitudes Related to Transportation and Travel, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
    • Domestic Brands Lure Mature Drivers
    • Mature Adults Open to New Experiences, Especially In-Country
    • Domestic Travel Attracts Vacation Home Owners, Grandparents

Chapter 2: Demographics

  • The Mature Market: A Whole New Game
  • Increased Lifespans Accompany Improved Quality of Life
  • Mature Adults Retain a Youthful Outlook
  • Boomers Force Marketers to Anticipate Needs of Aging Population
  • Mature Adults Are the Fastest-Growing Demographic
  • Adults 50+ Wield Significant Spending Power
  • Frail Older Adults Still Vulnerable
  • Mature Adults Still Vibrant, Young Inside
  • Fears of Aging May Inhibit Targeted, Innovative Campaigns
  • Savvy Marketers Can Adapt Products, Services to Support Quality of Life
  • Diverse Interests and Needs Characterize Mature Adults
  • Chronological Age Less Important than Values, Life Stage
  • Figure 2-1: Share of Mature Market by Race/Ethnicity, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Among Working Matures, Occupations Vary by Gender, Ethnicity
  • Distribution by Age Bracket Reveals Some Commonalities
  • Leading Edge Boomers 55-64 Still Working, Supporting Families
  • Youngest Mature Household See Biggest Share of Employment Income
  • Children, Grandchildren Still Play Major Role
  • Mature Hispanic Households Highly Child-Focused
  • Mature African American Households Often Supporting Youngsters
  • Young Seniors Age 55-64 Share Memories of Conformity and Revolution
  • Lower Education Levels Among Young Seniors vs. Boomers
  • Most Young Seniors Retired From Full-Time Careers
  • Additional Income from Social Security, Pensions, Investment
  • Adults 75 and Over Survived Hard Times
  • Quality of Life Centers on Positive Attitude
  • Longevity Correlated with Active, Engaged Lifestyle
  • Looking Ahead: Advice for Marketers
  • Mature Market Wide Open for Those with Imagination, Focus
  • Research Discrete Segments of Mature Market
  • Whatever the Channel, Build Emotional Bonds
  • Allow for Joint Decision-Making Occasions
  • Table 2-1: Overview of Mature Market Demographics, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Table 2-2: Overview of Mature Market Demographics: Women, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Table 2-3: Overview of Mature Market Demographics: Men, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Table 2-4: Overview of Mature Market Demographics: Non-Hispanic Whites, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Table 2-5: Overview of Mature Market Demographics: Hispanic Americans, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Table 2-6: Overview of Mature Market Demographics: African Americans, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Table 2-7: Overview of Mature Market Demographics: Adults Age 55-64, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 2-8: Overview of Mature Market Demographics: Adults Age 65-74, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 2-9: Overview of Mature Market Demographics: Adults Age 75 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)

Chapter 3: Lifestyle, Health, and Wellness

  • Fitness Possible at Any Age
  • Medical and Tech Solutions in High Demand
  • Socializing + Exercise = A Winning Combination
  • Mature Athletes Open Up Marketing Opportunities
  • Senior-centric Fitness Programs Promote Wellness, Generate Revenue
  • Fastest-Growing Health Club Memberships Are 55+
  • Health Clubs Catering to Disabled, Impaired
  • Nursing Homes See Big Benefits from Resident Exercise Programs
  • Fitness Industry Must Accommodate Mature Adults
  • Physical Health, Mobility, Independence Rank High for Matures
  • Mature Market Adults Value Doctors Advice, Medications, Nutrition
  • Physically Active Adults Especially Attuned to Nutrition, Health
  • Figure 3-1: Selected High Index Activities/Attitudes Among Mature Market Adults Who Participate in Exercise/Physical Fitness Activities 3 or More Times Weekly, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Mature Adults Going to Internet for Medical, Health Answers
  • Leading Edge Boomers Much More Internet Savvy Than Elders
  • Computer Literacy Lower Among Older Mature Market Adults
  • Socioeconomic Level, Age Bracket Predict Internet, Computer Comfort
  • Computer, Internet Use Skews Toward Health Info, Pharmaceuticals
  • Education Level, Age Bracket Linked to Health Literacy, Self-Determination
  • Low Education Levels Linked with Poor Physical, Emotional Health
  • Low Health Literacy Among Seniors Interferes with Healing
  • Home Monitoring Improves Patient Health, Caregiver Peace of Mind
  • Telehealth Options Offer Reduced Costs, Personalized Care
  • Technology Offers Patients Greater Control, Freedom, Comfort
  • Electronic Monitoring Keeps Doctors Connected, Informed, Mobile
  • Adaptable Med/Tech Devices Promise Mobility, Independence
  • Table 3-1: Selected Lifestyle Statements: Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 3-2: Indices for Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Mature Market Adults: By Age Bracket, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Table 3-3: Indices for Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Mature Market Adults: By Number of Times Weekly Participate in Exercise/Physical Fitness Activities, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Table 3-4: Indices for Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Mature Market Adults: By Gender, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Table 3-5: Indices for Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Mature Market Adults: By Socio-Economic Level, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Table 3-6: Indices for Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Mature Market Adults: By Residence in Retirement Home, Nursing Home, or Assisted Living Facility, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Table 3-7: Indices for Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Mature Market Adults: By Employment Status, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Table 3-8: Indices for Selected Lifestyle Statements Among Mature Market Adults: By Race/Ethnicity, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)

Chapter 4: Personal Finance and Home Ownership

  • Mature Adults Experiencing Greater Economic Well-Being
  • Mature Clients Require Personalized Financial Strategies
  • Mature Workers Keep Working; Employers Court Experience
  • Generation Gap is Out; Financial Gap is In
  • Full-Time Hours on the Rise for Senior Workers
  • Many Worry Retirement Savings Wont Meet Future Needs
  • Many Matures Keep Working for the Fun of It
  • Self-Employment Common Among Mature Market Adults
  • Mature Adults Feel More Secure Than Adults on Average
  • Home Ownership Linked with Financial Comfort
  • Home Purchase, Mortgage Payoff, and Renovations Boost Financial Well-Being
  • Financial Comfort Predicts Reading of Financial Pages
  • Majority of Mature Adults Say Theyre Savvy Money Managers
  • Low-Risk Investments Popular Among Mature Cohort
  • Figure 4-1: Selected High Index Investment and Banking Instruments Among Mature Market Adults, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Stocks, Securities See Significant Investment
  • Financial Security Eludes the Under-employed, Under-educated
  • Money Worries Widespread Across Socioeconomic Levels
  • Feeling Secure Does Not Guarantee Being Secure
  • Mature Market Adults Shy Away from Retirement Planning
  • Mature Market Hispanics and Blacks Especially Vulnerable
  • Reliance on Credit Cards Fuels Increased Debt Among 55+
  • Mature Adults Prefer to Pay Credit Balances in Full
  • Sprees in Early Retirement Can Become Long-Term Debt
  • Financial Emergencies Create Slippery Slope of Credit Debt
  • Visa, MasterCard Popular; Reward Points Draw Wallet-Conscious Seniors
  • AmEx Green Inspires Loyalty: Its All About the Points
  • AmEx Blue a Popular, Fee-Free Card
  • Should Credit Cards Offer Senior-centric Rewards?
  • Life, Health Insurance Policies Draw Mature Dollars
  • Mature Adults Sell Life Insurance Policies to Raise Cash
  • Life Settlement Industry Is Big Business
  • Life Settlement Bridges Financial Gaps
  • Insurance Industry Wary of Growing Trend
  • Caregivers Leave Jobs, Incur Debt to Help Loved Ones
  • Financial Burdens Significant, But Frantic Caregivers Put Loved Ones First
  • Long-Term Care Insurance May Offer Viable Alternative
  • Long-Term Care Market Risky for Insurers: Deep Pockets Needed
  • Employers See Growing Demand for Long-Term Care Insurance
  • Cooperation Between Governments, Private Industry May Relieve Pressure on Medicaid
  • BlueCross/BlueShield of Michigan Develops Innovative, Cost-Cutting Products
  • LifeSecure, Healthy Blue Reward Healthy Living
  • Home Equity Can Keep Seniors at Home, Out of Nursing Homes
  • Mature Adults Prefer to Age in Place
  • Mature Migration Split Down Ability/Disability Line
  • Higher Migration Rates Among Mature Adults with Disabilities
  • Aging in Place Fosters Independence, Quality of Life
  • Universal Design Can Reduce Healthcare, Insurance Costs
  • Universal Design Slowly Entering Cultural Awareness
  • Reverse Mortgages Offer Elegant Financial Solutions
  • Growing Trend Helps Fund Retirement, Pay Off Debt
  • Financial Freedom Senior Funding Offers Several Product Options
  • Creative, Personalized Financing Vital to Mature Market Security
  • Table 4-1: Overview of Attitudes and Opinions about Finance and Home: Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 4-2: Mature Market Traits in Relation to Agreement With Statement: I Feel Secure Financially, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55 or over)
  • Table 4-3: Mature Market Traits in Relation to Agreement With Statement: I Read the Financial Pages of My Newspaper, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55 or over)
  • Table 4-4: Overview of Housing and Home Improvement Patterns: Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 4-5: Overview of Investment and Banking Patterns: Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 4-6: Mature Market Traits in Relation to Agreement With Statement: Investing in the Stock Market Is Too Risky, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55 or over)
  • Table 4-7: Overview of Credit Card Usage Patterns: Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 4-8: Overview of Insurance Patterns: Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 4-9: Mature Market Traits in Relation to Agreement With Statement: My Home Is an Important Part of Who I Am, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55 or over)

Chapter 5: Internet and Telecommunications

  • Comfort Level Reflects Mature Age Segment, Experience
  • Technology Helps Bridge Former Generation Gap
  • Despite Converging Generational Values, Tech Gap Remains
  • Technology Gap Divides Younger, Older Mature Market Segments
  • Figure 5-1: Selected High and Low Index Mature Market Demographics for Agreement with Statement The Internet Has Had No Impact on My Life, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Age a Strong Predictor for Internet Access
  • Mature Market Adults Under Age 70 Lead Online Growth
  • Long-Range Tech Access Strategies Should Assess Elder Needs
  • Online Elders Experience Less Depression, Greater Sense of Control
  • Education, Socio-economics, Life Stage Also Predict Internet Use
  • Mature Market Computer Use Parallels Online Status
  • Matures Purchase of Software, Add-Ons Parallels Younger Generations, But in Fewer Numbers
  • Mature Market Less Enthusiastic Than Younger Set About Gaming, WebCam Accessories
  • Computing Accessories Represent Opportunity for Growth
  • Relevance, Accessibility, Ease of Navigation Essential for Discrete Mature Segments
  • SeniorNet Brings Mature Market Adults into the Loop
  • IBM Simplifies Web Access for Seniors, Visually Disabled
  • cRANKy.com Search Engine Narrows Hits to Mature-Relevant
  • Mature-Focused Social Networking Sites Expect Exponential Growth
  • Access to Land Line Phones Virtually Universal; Special Features Help Mature Adults Connect
  • Even Cell Phone Use Reflects Digital Divide
  • Mature Market Adults Value Conversation Over Gadgets
  • Simplicity Trumps Add-Ons, Especially for Over-65
  • Jitterbug Cell Phones Push Simplicity, Safety
  • Jitterbug Phone May Need to Work Out a Few Bugs
  • Senior Friendly Cell Phones Have Big Buttons, High Sound Quality
  • Motorola RAZR Not Just for Teenie-Boppers Anymore
  • Mature Market Adults Share TV Love with Younger Generations
  • Fancy Gizmos Less Important Than Reliable Service
  • Mature Market Adults Favor News, Movies on Cable Channels
  • Game Shows, Interviews, News, and Information Draw Age 55+
  • Retirement Living Television Scores Relevance Bulls Eye
  • With Targeted Programming, TV Finally Grows Up!
  • Table 5-1: Overview of Attitudes and Opinions about Technology and Media: Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 5-2: Mature Market Traits in Relation to Agreement With Statement: The Internet Has Had No Impact on My Life, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55 or over)
  • Table 5-3: Personal Computer (PC) Usage at Home: Adults Overall, Adults Age 55-64, and Adults Age 65 or Over, 2005 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 5-4: Use of Personal Computers and the Internet: Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 5-5: Use of Telecom Equipment: Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 5-6: Use of Audio-Visual Consumer Electronics (Including TV): Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 5-7: Use of Television: Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)

Chapter 6: Travel, Transportation, and Entertainment

  • Drivers License Central to Mature Adults Work, Leisure Pursuits
  • Loss of Driving Capability Detracts from Independence, Quality of Life
  • Stereotypes Obscure Real-Life Impact of On-the-Road Behavior
  • Older Drivers Can Adapt to Changing Physical Capabilities
  • In-Vehicle Technologies Can Enhance Visibility, Performance
  • Mature Adults Prefer Many Safety Features in Cars
  • Drivers Over Age 65 to Double by 2030
  • Mature Adults Likely to Buy Cars New, Opt for Amenities
  • Figure 6-1: Selected High and Low Index Mature Market Demographics for Activities and Attitudes Related to Transportation and Travel, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55+)
  • Vision Enhancement Systems Provide Nighttime Back-Up
  • Cadillacs Night Vision Started Hot, Chilled Quickly
  • Collision Avoidance Systems Offer Electronic Buffer
  • Global Positioning Systems Attract Married, Active Seniors
  • Practicality, Reliability, Domestic Manufacture Dominate Mature Vehicle Choices
  • Full-Size Chrysler 300C Combines Style, Safety, Luxury Across Generations
  • Domestic Brands Lure Mature Drivers
  • Car-Based Pollution Concerns Majority of Mature Americans
  • Hybrid Vehicles Unexpectedly Popular Among Diverse Mature Segments
  • Toyota Welcab Promotes Mobility, Independence
  • Compact, Sporty Vehicles Keep Disabled, Elderly Drivers Mobile
  • Toyota Betting on Long-Term Mainstreaming of Welcab Options
  • Mature Adults Open to New Experiences, Especially In-Country
  • Domestic Travel Attracts Vacation Home Owners, Grandparents
  • Alaska Offers Wilderness, Adventure, Natural Beauty
  • In Maine, Count on Wildlife, Fall Foliage, and Maple Syrup
  • Grandtravel Promotes Adventure, Education for Both Generations
  • Soft Adventure Lures Physically Fit
  • Arts, Culture, Lifelong Learning Add Meaning to Getaways at Home and Abroad
  • Voluntourism, Spiritual Quests Keep Leading Edge Boomers Young
  • Table 6-1: Overview of Attitudes About Transportation, Travel, and Entertainment: Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 6-2: Overview of Transportation Patterns: Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 6-3: Mature Market Traits in Relation to Agreement With Statement: Normally Buy Cars Brand New, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55 or over)
  • Table 6-4: Mature Market Traits in Relation to Agreement With Statement: Am Worried About Pollution Caused by Cars, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55 or over)
  • Table 6-5: Overview of Travel Patterns: Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 6-6: Mature Market Traits in Relation to Agreement With Statement: Prefer to Travel Within the U.S., 2006 (U.S. adults age 55 or over)
  • Table 6-7: Mature Market Traits in Relation to Agreement With Statement: Often Go on Long Car Trips for Vacation, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55 or over)
  • Table 6-8: Activity- and Event-Based Trips and Entertainment: Cruises, Theme Parks, Sporting Events, and Casinos Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 6-9: Selected Leisure and Entertainment Activities: Adults Overall, Adults Age 18-54, and Adults Age 55 or Over, 2006 (U.S. adults)
  • Table 6-10: Mature Market Traits in Relation to Agreement With Statement: Consider Myself Interested in the Arts, 2006 (U.S. adults age 55 or over)

Abstract:

One of the greatest mistakes marketers can make is to assume that once consumers reach 55 years old, that they fade out of the consumer market. The “mature market” spans 40 or more years and embraces generations of socio-cultural, political, and technological revolutions, not to mention a vast array of lifestyles, financial situations, health concerns, career choices, education levels, and family dynamics: People are living nearly 30 years longer and enjoying a better quality of life than ever before.

As of Spring 2006, nearly 68 million people had reached age 55 at their last birthday, and various estimates have the population over 50 holding nearly $20 trillion in resources, controlling over 70% of disposable income, and wielding $1.6 trillion in spending power. By 2030, people age 65 and over are expected to number over 70 million; an even greater wave is sweeping the 85 and over age bracket, who are projected to surge from 4 million in 2000 to an amazing 20 million by 2050.

The market has not focused enough effort in meeting the wants and needs of those already in their 60s, 70s, and beyond. To help marketers prepare, Packaged Facts presents The Mature Market: Consumer Trends and U.S. Retail Markets, an all-new report on the attitudes, preferences, and shopping behaviors of mature market consumers. Drawing on uniquely cross-tabulated Simmons Market Research Bureau survey data, along with government and private sector data sources and interviews with experts, public relations and industry analysts in firms that specialize in boomer market research, this report provides overview of mature market attitudes and spending trends in five focused chapters:

  • Mature Market Demographics. This chapter discusses the ways that successful marketing requires careful research into specific, overlapping demographic groups, many defined by life stage and not age. Regional, economic, and educational differences add additional dimensions.
  • Mature Market Lifestyles, Health, and Wellness. This chapter reviews the growing health and fitness industry in mature sectors, and the ways that preventive wellness and exercise can help reduce burgeoning medical costs.
  • Mature Market Personal Finance and Home Ownership. This chapter examines work habits, consumer debt, and personal financial strategies like long-term care insurance and reverse mortgages.
  • Mature Market Internet and Telecommunications. This chapters presents the growing digital activity of the mature market, from medical research to social networking, including additional technologies that will assist marketers in reaching target markets with hearing or sight impairments.
  • Mature Market Travel, Transportation, and Entertainment. This chapter focuses on the ways that leisure and travel activities fit into the mature market’s desire for independence, mobility, and new experiences.

If your company is interested in understanding and reaching the mature market, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight about mature consumers not offered in any other single source.

Get full details about this report >

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