The U.S. African-American Market, 6th Edition

Published: Jan 1, 2006 - 264 Pages

Table of Contents:

Chapter 1 Executive Summary
  • Introduction
  • Background
  • Overview of Report
  • Scope and Methodology
    • Market Definition
    • Methodology

  • Profile of the African American Population
    • African American Population Totals 37.5 Million
    • Foreign-Born Black Population Shows Rapid Increase
    • Black Population Continues to Grow at Above-Average Rate
    • African American Population Will Exceed 40 Million in 2010
    • African Americans Influential in Younger Age Groups
    • Southern States Have Highest Percentage of African Americans
    • African Americans More Dispersed than Hispanics
    • Fast-Growing African American Populations Found throughout the United States

  • The Role of African Americans in the American Economy
    • African American Income Rising Faster than Average
    • Incomes of African Americans Continue to Outpace Hispanics’
    • Nearly 2 Million African American Households Have Incomes of $75,000 or More
    • Aggregate Income of Most Affluent Black Families Reaches $116 Billion
    • Number of Black Homeowners Grew by One-Third in Last Decade
    • Nearly 3.3 Million African Americans Have Bachelors Degree or More
    • Black Women’s Educational Attainment Outpaces Black Men’s
    • Blacks More Likely to Be in Labor Force

  • Overview of African American Consumers
    • Differences in Consumer Expenditure Patterns Analyzed
    • African Americans Enjoy Shopping More
    • Black Shoppers Are Browsers
    • Brand Awareness Higher, Brand Loyalty Lower

  • Highlights of Consumer Behavior
    • African Americans Closing the Digital Divide
    • African Americans as Likely to Use Internet as All U.S. Adults
    • Cell Phones Just as Common
    • African American Consumers Try to Take Care of Their Health
    • African Americans Trust OTC Remedies more than Prescription Drugs
    • Black Consumers Equate Drugs’ Cost with Effectiveness
    • African Americans More Receptive to Drug Company Advertising
    • Looks More Important than Safety When Buying a Car
    • African American Drivers Want New Cars
    • Foreign Cars Impress African Americans More
    • Black Consumers Interested in Trying New Drinks
    • Black Women Focus Less on Cooking
    • Eating Habits Vary

  • African Americans: A Regional Perspective
    • Blacks in Northeast and West Relatively More Affluent
    • African Americans in Northeast Most Driven to Succeed in Careers
    • Attitudes toward Family Vary by Region
    • Southern Blacks Least Likely to Go Shopping Frequently
    • Brand Awareness Higher in Northeast
    • Southern Blacks less Fashion Forward
    • African Americans in Northeast Focus on Looking Young and Staying Slim
    • Regional Differences in African American Market More Profound than in General Market

  • The African American Family as a Consumer Unit
    • Black Parents Feel Less Financially Secure
    • African American Families Find It Hard to Save
    • Black Parents More Ambitious
    • Black Parents Have More Traditional Childrearing Attitudes
    • Shopping Not a Family Affair for African Americans
    • Married-Couple Parents Less Likely to Indulge Kids
    • Single Moms Influenced by Kids’ Ideas about Brands
    • African American Parents More Fashion-Conscious
    • Prepared Foods More Common in Black Families

  • Use of Leisure Time
    • African Americans Have More Leisure Time and Spend It Differently
    • African Americans’ Home Electronics Budget Much Higher than Average
    • African American Households Contain More Video Products
    • Black Households More Likely to Buy Rather than Rent DVDs
    • Music Choices Show Cultural Divide
    • African Americans are Moviegoers
    • African Americans Travel Less Often
    • Cruises Become More Popular
    • Theme Parks More Popular among African Americans

  • Media Usage
    • Black Newspaper Readers Younger than Average
    • African Americans More Likely to Turn to Magazines
    • Significant Overlap in Most Popular Magazine Titles but Clear Differences Remain
    • Television Gets More Attention in Black Households
    • Primetime Viewing Habits Analyzed
    • BET Tops List of Cable Services Popular with African American Men
    • Lifetime Most Popular Cable TV Service among Black Women
    • Viewers’ Tastes in Weekly TV Shows Diverge
    • Greater Disparity in Cable TV Program Choices of Women
    • Black Women Most Likely to Tune in Radio
    • Radio Format Preferences Distinct
    • Internet Begins to Weaken Appeal of Traditional Media among African Americans

  • Marketing and Advertising Trends
    • Some Observers Perceive Lack of Attention to African American Market
    • African American Marketing Seen as Losing Ground to Hispanic Campaigns
    • Targeted Marketing Seen as Vital
    • Hip-Hop Culture Continues to Drive Many Campaigns
    • Traditional African American Marketing Strategies Still Used

  • African American Buying Power
    • African American Consumers Key to Profits in Many Industries and Product Areas
    • African American Buying Power at $762 Billion
    • African American Buying Power Will Reach $981 Billion in 2010

  • Trends and Opportunities
    • African Americans Keep Moving to the South and Flocking to the Suburbs
    • African American Market Still Outpaces Hispanic Market in Key Areas
    • African Americans Prime Customers for New Technology
    • Affluent African Americans Continue to Offer Increasing Promise

Section 1 Demographic Overview
Chapter 2 Profile of the African American Population Current Size and Projected Growth of the African American Population

  • African American Population Totals 37.5 Million
  • Table 2-1: Profile of the Black Population of the United States by Race Alone and Hispanic Origin, 2004
  • Table 2-2: U.S. Population by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2004 Foreign-Born Black Population Shows Rapid Increase
  • Table 2-3: Ancestry and Place of Birth of Foreign-Born African Americans, 2004 Black Population Continues to Grow at Above-Average Rate
  • Table 2-4: Population Growth, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, April 2000-2004
  • African American Population Will Exceed 40 Million in 2010
  • Table 2-5: Projected Population Growth, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, 2005 vs. 2010
  • African Americans Influential in Younger Age Groups
  • Table 2-6: Population by Selected Age Group, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, 2004
  • Table 2-7: African Americans as Percent of Total Population by Selected Age Group, July 2004
  • Females Relatively More Numerous
  • Table 2-8: Population by Selected Age Group, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, 2004

  • Geographic Distribution
    • New York Has Largest African American Population
    • Table 2-9: States with Largest African American Populations, 2004 Southern States Have Highest Percentage of African Americans
    • Table 2-10: States with Highest Percentage of African Americans, 2004 African Americans More Dispersed than Hispanics
    • Table 2-11: Distribution of Population by State, African Americans vs. Hispanics Fast-Growing African American Populations Found throughout the United States
    • Table 2-12: States with Fastest-Growing African American Populations, 2000-2004

    Chapter 3 The Role of African Americans in the American Economy

    • Economic Profile
      • African American Income Rising Faster than Average
      • Table 3-1: Aggregate Personal and Household Income, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, 1984 vs. 2004
      • Middle-Income African Americans More Common
      • Table 3-2: Distribution of Mean Income of People 15 Years and Over, African Americans vs. All People, 2004
      • Table 3-3: Distribution of Mean Income of Males 15 Years and Over, African American vs. All Males, 2004
      • Table 3-4: Distribution of Mean Income of Females 15 Years and Over, African American vs. All Females, 2004
      • Incomes of African Americans Continue to Outpace Hispanics’
      • Table 3-5: Mean Income of People 15 Years and Over, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, 2004
      • Table 3-6: Income per Household Member, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, 1992 vs. 2004
      • Table 3-7: Mean Household and Family Income, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, 2004
      • Table 3-8: Mean Income of Families by Type, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, 2004 Nearly 2 Million African American Households Have Incomes of $75,000 or More
      • Table 3-9: Distribution of Total Money Income of Households, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, 2004
      • Table 3-10: Distribution of Income of Families, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups, 2004
      • Table 3-11: Distribution of Income of Married-Couple Families, African American vs. All Married-Couple Families, 2004 Aggregate Income of Most Affluent Black Families Reaches $116 Billion
      • Table 3-12: Mean Income and Aggregate of Most Affluent African American Families, 2004 Number of Black Homeowners Grew by One-Third in Last Decade
      • Table 3-13: Household Tenure by Household Type, African Americans vs. All Households, 2005
      • Table 3-14: Number of Owner-Occupied Households, African American vs. All Households, 1995 vs. 2005

    • Educational Attainment and Employment Patterns
      • African American College Enrollment Tops 2 Million
      • Table 3-15: College Enrollment of the Population 18 Years and Over by
      • Age Group, African Americans vs. All People, 2004
      • Black Women More Likely to Attend College
      • Table 3-16: College Enrollment of African Americans 18 Years and Over by Age Group and Gender, 2004
      • Table 3-17: Females as Percent of Total College Enrollment by Age Group, African American vs. All Women, 2004
      • Nearly 3.3 Million African Americans Have Bachelors Degree or More
      • Table 3-18: Educational Attainment of the Population with Earnings 18
      • Years and Over, African Americans vs. All People, 2005
      • Table 3-19: Educational Attainment of the Population with Earnings 18
      • Years and Over, African Americans vs. Hispanics, 2005
      • Black Women’s Educational Attainment Outpaces Black Men’s
      • Table 3-20: Educational Attainment of African Americans with Earnings 18 Years and Over by Gender, 2005
      • Blacks More Likely to Be in Labor Force
      • Table 3-21: Labor Force Status of People 20 Years Old and Over,
      • Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 2004
      • Table 3-22: Employment Status of the Population 16 Years of Age and Over, by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2004 Occupational Patterns Analyzed
      • Table 3-23: Occupations of Men, African American vs. All Men, 2005
      • Table 3-24: Occupations of Women, African American vs. All Women, 2005
      • Table 3-25: Leading Occupations of African American Men and Women, 2005

    Section 2 Understanding the African American Consumer
    Chapter 4 Overview of African American Consumers

    • Profile of African American Consumer Units
      • Consumer Units Defined
      • African American Consumer Units Spend Higher Percentage of Before-Tax Income
      • Table 4-1: Expenditures of African American Consumer Units as Percent of Before-Tax Income African American Consumer Units Profiled
      • Table 4-2: Characteristics of Consumer Units, African American Consumer Units vs. All Consumer Units

    • Summary of African American Consumer Expenditure Patterns
      • Differences in Consumer Expenditure Patterns Analyzed
      • Table 4-3: Consumer Expenditures Categories for Which African Americans Spend a Higher Percentage of Their Total Budget than All Consumer Units
      • Table 4-4: Consumer Expenditures Categories for Which African Americans Spend a Lower Percentage of Their Total Budget than All Consumer Units

    • Overview of Shopping Behavior and Buying Patterns
      • African Americans Enjoy Shopping More
      • Table 4-5: Attitudes toward Shopping, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Black Shoppers Are Browsers
      • Table 4-6: In-Store Shopping Behavior of African Americans by Gender Low Prices Attract African American Shoppers
      • Table 4-7: Shopping for Bargains, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender Brand Awareness Higher, Brand Loyalty Lower
      • Table 4-8: Brand Awareness of African Americans by Gender

    Chapter 5 Highlights of Consumer Behavior Use of Computers and the Internet

    • African Americans Closing the Digital Divide
    • Table 5-1: Ownership of Home Computers, African American vs. All Households
    • Black Women Likely to Use Computer at Work
    • Table 5-2: Use of Computer at Work, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
    • African Americans as Likely to Use Internet as All U.S. Adults
    • Table 5-3: Overview of Internet Usage, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults
    • African Americans Less Likely to Go Online Often
    • Table 5-4: Frequency of Internet Use, African Americans. vs. All U.S. Adults
    • Internet Changes Way African Americans Plan Shopping Trips but Online Buying Remains Less Robust
      • Table 5-5: Impact of the Internet on Shopping Behavior, African Americans vs. All U.S Adults by Gender.
      • Table 5-6: Online Activities Last 30 Days, African American Men vs. All U.S. Men
      • Table 5-7: Online Activities Last 30 Days, African American Women vs. All U.S. Women

    • Telecommunications
      • African Americans Spend More on Telecommunications
      • Figure 5-1: Annual Expenditures on Telephone Services, African Americans vs. All Consumer Units
      • Cell Phones Just as Common
      • Figure 5-2: Ownership and Use of Cell Phones, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Blacks More Likely to Use Broad Array of Telecommunications Services
      • Table 5-8: Use of Cellular/Wireless Services, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Table 5-9: Use of Telephone Services, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Prepaid Calling Cards Less Often Used
      • Table 5-10: Use of Telephone Credit Cards, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender

    • Health and Pharmaceuticals
      • Health Expenditures Lower than Average
      • Table 5-11: Annual Expenditures for Health Care by Amount and Percent of Total Expenditures, African Americans vs. All Consumer Units
      • African American Consumers Try to Take Care of Their Health
      • Table 5-12: Attitudes toward Maintaining Personal Health, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Relationship with Physicians Complex
      • Table 5-13: Attitudes toward Physicians, African Americans vs. All U.S.
      • Adults by Gender
      • African Americans More Likely to Use Hardcopy Sources of Health Information
      • Table 5-14: Sources of Health Information, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Black Consumers Turn to Medicines Faster
      • Table 5-15: Use of Medications, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • African Americans Trust OTC Remedies more than Prescription Drugs
      • Table 5-16: Prescription vs. Over-the-Counter Remedies, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Black Consumers Equate Drugs’ Cost with Effectiveness
      • Table 5-17: Attitudes toward Cost of Prescription Drugs, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • African Americans More Receptive to Drug Company Advertising
      • Table 5-18: Attitudes toward Drug Advertising, African Americans vs. All
      • U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Black Consumers See Less Value in Vitamins
      • Table 5-19: Attitudes toward Vitamins, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • African American Men More Interested in Alternative Medicine
      • Table 5-20: Attitudes toward Non-traditional Medicine, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender

    • Automobiles
      • Vehicle Purchase Expenditures Analyzed
      • Table 5-21: Annual Expenditures for Vehicle Purchases and Related
      • Expenses by Amount and Percent of Total Expenditures, African Americans vs. All Consumer Units Looks More Important than Safety
      • Table 5-22: Reasons for Buying a Vehicle, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Auto Technology and Horsepower Less Important to African American Men
      • Table 5-23: Interest in Automotive Technology, African Americans vs. All
      • U.S. Adults by Gender
      • African American Drivers Want New Cars
      • Table 5-24: Attitudes toward New Cars, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Foreign Cars Impress African Americans More
      • Table 5-25: Foreign vs. Domestic Cars, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender

    • Food at Home
      • Food at Home Gets High Priority
      • Table 5-26: Annual Expenditures for Food at Home by Amount and Percent of Total Expenditures, African Americans vs. All Consumer Units
      • Table 5-27: Expenditures on Meats, Poultry, Fish, and Eggs, African
      • American vs. All Consumer Units
      • Black Consumers Interested in Trying New Drinks
      • Table 5-28: Attitudes toward Trying New Foods, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Black Women Focus Less on Cooking Table 5-29: Attitudes toward Cooking, African American Women vs. All U.S. Women
      • Eating Habits Vary
      • Table 5-30: Eating Habits, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender African Americans More Relaxed about Fattening Foods
      • Table 5-31: Attitudes toward Dieting, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender

    Chapter 6 African Americans: A Regional Perspective Demographic Overview

    • South Most Significant Market Region
    • Table 6-1: African American Population by Region, 2004
    • Table 6-2: African Americans as Percent of Total Population of Region, 2004
    • Blacks in Northeast and West Relatively More Affluent
    • Table 6-3: Mean and Aggregate Income of African Americans 15 Years Old and Over by Region, 2004
    • Table 6-4: African American Aggregate Income vs. Population by Region, 2004
    • Table 6-5: Mean and Aggregate Income of African American Families by Region, 2004
    • Table 6-6: African American Aggregate Family Income vs. Number of Families by Region, 2004 Social Values
      • Regional Profile of African Americans Differs
      • Table 6-7: Social and Religious Values of All U.S. Adults by Region
      • Table 6-8: Social and Religious Values of African Americans by Region
      • African Americans in Northeast Most Driven to Succeed in Careers
      • Table 6-9: Attitudes toward Work and Money, African Americans by Region
      • Blacks in Northeast Feel More Financially Secure
      • Table 6-10: Attitudes toward Personal Finance, African Americans by Region
      • Attitudes toward Family Vary by Region
      • Table 6-11: Attitudes toward Family, African Americans by Region African Americans in Northeast More Tolerant of Children
      • Table 6-12: Attitudes toward Children, African Americans by Region

    • Regional Differences and Similarities in Consumer Behavior
      • Southern Blacks Least Likely to Go Shopping Frequently
      • Table 6-13: Shopping Attitudes and Behavior, African Americans by Region
      • Blacks in Central Region Less Motivated by Price When They Shop
      • Table 6-14: Price Sensitivity of African Americans by Region Brand Awareness Higher in Northeast
      • Table 6-15: Brand Awareness of African Americans by Region Southern Blacks less Fashion Forward
      • Table 6-16: Fashion Attitudes of African Americans by Region African Americans in Northeast Focus on Looking Young and Staying Slim
      • Table 6-17: Self-Image of African Americans by Region
      • Table 6-18: Attitudes toward Dieting, African Americans by Region
      • Regional Differences in African American Market More Profound than in General Market
      • Table 6-19: Key Consumer Attitudes in South and Northeast, African Americans vs. All Adults

    Chapter 7 The African American Family as a Consumer Unit Family Structure

    • African American Households Show Distinct Profile
    • Table 7-1: Marital Status of People 15 Years Old and Over, African Americans vs. All People, 2004
    • Table 7-2: Household Type, African American vs. All Households, 2005 African American Households Average Size
    • Table 7-3: Size of Households, African Americans vs. All Households, 2005
    • Black Families Larger than Average
    • Table 7-4: Size of Family Households, African Americans vs. All Households, 2005
    • Table 7-5: Presence of Siblings in Families, African American Children vs.
    • All Children, 2004
    • Single Moms Head Majority of Black Families with Children
    • Table 7-6: Families with Children under 18 Years Old by Type of Family, African American vs. All Families, 2005
    • Table 7-7: Marital Status of Parents and Living Arrangements of Children, African American Children vs. Other Children
    • Table 7-8: African American Children Living with Grandparents, 2004
    • Family Finances
      • More than One-Third of African American Kids Have Single Mom Who
      • Works
      • Table 7-9: Labor Force Status of Parents, African American Children vs. Other Children, 2004
      • Stay-at-Home Moms in Married-Couple Families Less Common
      • Table 7-10: Stay-at-Home Moms in Married-Couple Families with Children under 15, African American Children vs. All Children, 2004
      • Table 7-11: Number of Earners in Family Households, African American vs. All Family Households, 2005
      • Nearly 1.6 Million Black Children Live in Families with Incomes of $75,000 or More
      • Table 7-12: Mean Income of Married-Couple Families with Children, African Americans vs. Other Population Groups
      • Table 7-13: Income of Families with Children, African American Children vs. Other Children
      • Black Parents Feel Less Financially Secure
      • Table 7-14: Indicators of Financial Confidence, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers
      • African American Families Find It Hard to Save
      • Table 7-15: Attitudes toward Saving and Spending, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers
      • Table 7-16: Attitudes toward Money of 6- to 11-Year-Olds, African Americans vs. All Kids
      • Table 7-17: Attitudes toward Money of 12- to 17-Year-Olds, African Americans vs. All Teens
      • Black Parents Underserved by Financial Services Industry
      • Table 7-18: Use of Financial Services, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers
      • One-Third of African American Married-Couple Parents Have Investments
      • Table 7-19: Use of Financial Services, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers
      • Life Insurance Gets Above-Average Priority
      • Table 7-20: Life Insurance and Health Insurance Coverage, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers
      • African American Parents More Likely to Give Kids an Allowance
      • Table 7-21: Income Sources of 6- to 11-Year-Olds, African Americans vs. All Kids
      • Table 7-22: Amount of Weekly Allowances/Chores Earnings of 6- to
      • 11-Year-Olds, African Americans vs. All Kids
      • Table 7-23: Income Sources of 12- to 17-Year-Olds, African Americans vs.
      • All Teens
      • Family Values
        • Black Parents More Ambitious
        • Table 7-24: Attitudes toward Work and Family, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers
        • Black Parents Have More Traditional Childrearing Attitudes
        • Table 7-25: Attitudes toward Children, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers
        • Table 7-26: 12- to 17-Year-Olds’ Views of Their Parents and Family,
        • African American vs. All Teens

      • Highlights of Consumer Behavior of African American Families
        • Shopping Not a Family Affair for African Americans
        • Table 7-27: Attitudes of African American Parents toward Shopping,
        • Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers
        • Table 7-28: Attitudes toward Shopping with Family and Friends, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers
        • Single Moms More Likely to Indulge Kids
        • Table 7-29: Attitudes toward Indulging Their Kids, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers
        • Single Moms Influenced by Kids’ Ideas about Brands
        • Figure 7-1: Percent of Parents Saying Their Kids Have Significant Influence on Brands
        • African American Households Above-Average Spenders on Apparel
        • Table 7-30: Annual Expenditures for Apparel and Services by Amount and Percent of Total Expenditures, African Americans vs. All Consumer Units
        • Table 7-31: Annual Expenditures for Children’s Apparel and Footwear,
        • African Americans vs. All Consumer Units
        • African American Parents More Fashion-Conscious
        • Table 7-32: Attitudes toward Fashion and Style, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers
        • Table 7-33: Attitudes toward Shopping and Buying Clothes, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers.
        • African American Parents Role Models for Teens in Fashion Area
        • Figure 7-2: Percent of 12- to 17-Year-Olds Who “Like to Keep Up with Latest Fashions”
        • African American Parents More Likely to Let Their Kids Pick Their Own Jeans and Sneakers Brands
        • Table 7-34: 6- to 11-Year-Olds’ Perception of Their Consumer Autonomy, African Americans vs. All Kids
        • Black Families More Concerned about Counting Calories
        • Table 7-35: Attitudes toward Fattening Foods, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers
        • Table 7-36: Attitudes toward Dieting, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers
        • Table 7-37: Attitudes of 12- to 17-Year-Olds toward Weight Control, African American vs. All Teens
        • Prepared Foods More Common in Black Families
        • Table 7-38: Attitudes toward Healthy Eating, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers
        • Table 7-39: Attitudes toward Prepared Foods, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers
        • Fast Food More Popular with Married-Couple African American Families
        • Table 7-40: Attitudes toward Fast Food, Married-Couple Parents vs. Single Mothers

    Chapter 8 Use of Leisure Time

    • Overview
      • African Americans Have More Leisure Time
      • Figure 8-1: Average Hours Spent per Day on Leisure and Sports Activities, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults
      • Table 8-1: Average Hours Spent per day in Primary Activities, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults
      • Leisure-Time Activities Differ
      • Table 8-2: Average Hours Spent per day in Leisure and Sports Activities, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults
      • Entertainment Expenditures Geared toward Home Entertainment
      • Table 8-3: Annual Expenditures for Entertainment by Amount and Percent of Total Expenditures, African Americans vs. All Consumer Units
      • Table 8-4: Annual Expenditures for Household Furnishings and Equipment by Amount and Percent of Total Expenditures, African Americans vs.
      • All Consumer Units

    • Home Entertainment
      • African Americans’ Home Electronics Budget Much Higher than Average
      • Figure 8-2: Percent of Entertainment Budget Spent on TV, Radios, and
      • Sound Equipment, African American vs. All Consumer Units
      • African Americans Place High Value on Consumer Electronics
      • Table 8-5: Attitudes toward Consumer Electronics Products, African
      • Americans vs. All U.S Adults by Gender.
      • Price Less of a Concern for African American Buyers of Consumer Electronics
      • Table 8-6: Attitudes toward Price When Buying New Consumer Electronics Products, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender African American Households Contain More Video Products
      • Table 8-7: Ownership of Video Products, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Black Households More Likely to Buy Rather than Rent DVDs
      • Table 8-8: Movie Genres Rented/Bought on DVD, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults Audio Products Less Visible in Black Households
      • Table 8-9: Ownership of Audio Products, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Music Choices Show Cultural Divide
      • Table 8-10: Most Popular Music Types, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults
      • Table 8-11: Most Popular Music Types, African American Men vs. All U.S. Men
      • Table 8-12: Most Popular Music Types, African American Women vs. All U.S. Women

    • Going to the Movies
      • African Americans are Moviegoers
      • Figure 8-3: Percent Saying They Are Regular Moviegoers, African
      • Americans vs. All U.S. Adults
      • Table 8-13: Movie Attendance, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Blacks See Movies Right After They Open
      • Table 8-14: When People Usually See a Movie, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Action/Adventure Films and Comedies Get Nod
      • Table 8-15: Movie Genre Seen in Theaters, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • African Americans Prime Targets for In-Theater Ads
      • Figure 8-4: Percent Noticing Commercials/Ads in Movie Theaters, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults

    • Travel
    • Wide Gender Gap in Vacation Planning
    • Table 8-16: Attitudes toward Travel, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
    • African Americans Travel Less Often
    • Table 8-17: Domestic Round Trips Taken in Last 12 Months, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults
    • Table 8-18: Profile of Domestic Trips Taken in Last 12 Months, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults
    • Cruises Become More Popular
    • Figure 8-5: Percent Taking Cruise Ship Vacation in Last Three Years,
    • African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults
    • Theme Parks More Popular among African Americans
    • Figure 8-6: Percent Visiting Theme Park in Last 12 Months, African Americans vs. All U.S Adults.

    Chapter 9 Media Usage

    • Print Media
      • Black Newspaper Readers Younger than Average
      • Table 9-1: Attitudes toward Newspapers, African Americans vs. All U.S.
      • Adults by Gender
      • Table 9-2: Newspaper Readership, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Table 9-3: Demographics Related to Newspaper Readership, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults
      • African Americans More Likely to Turn to Magazines
      • Table 9-4: Attitudes toward Magazines, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • Magazine Preferences Differ
      • Table 9-5: Most Popular Publication Types, African American Men vs. All U.S. Men
      • Table 9-6: Most Popular Publication Types, African American Women vs. All U.S. Women
      • Significant Overlap in Most Popular Magazine Titles but Clear Differences Remain
      • Table 9-7: Most Popular Magazines, African American Men vs. All U.S.
      • Men
      • Table 9-8: Similarities and Differences in Magazines Popular with African American Men and All U.S. Men
      • Table 9-9: Most Popular Magazines, African American Women vs. All U.S. Women
      • Table 9-10: Similarities and Differences in Magazines Popular with African American Women and All U.S. Women
      • Black Magazines Outpace General-Market Publications

    • Television
      • Television Gets More Attention in Black Households
      • Table 9-11: African American Attitudes toward Television by Gender
      • African Americans More Interested in Video on Demand
      • Table 9-12: Pay-Per-View and Video on Demand, African American vs. All
      • U.S. Households
      • Primetime Viewing Habits Analyzed
      • Table 9-13: Primetime Network TV Viewing Habits, African American Men vs. All U.S. Men
      • Table 9-14: Primetime Network TV Viewing Habits, African American
      • Women vs. All U.S. Women
      • Table 9-15: Broadcast Networks Viewed in Primetime by 18- to 49-Year-Olds, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults by Gender
      • BET Tops List of Cable Services Popular with African American Men
      • Table 9-16: Most Popular Cable TV Services, African American Men vs. All U.S. Men
      • Table 9-17: Similarities and Differences in Cable TV Services Popular with African American Men and All U.S. Men
      • Lifetime Most Popular Cable TV Service among Black Women
      • Table 9-18: Most Popular Cable TV Services, African American Women vs.
      • All U.S. Women
      • Table 9-19: Similarities and Differences in Cable TV Services Popular with African American Women and All U.S. Women
      • Viewers’ Tastes in Weekly TV Shows Diverge
      • Table 9-20: Most Popular Once-a-Week TV Programs, African American
      • Men vs. All U.S. Men
      • Table 9-21: Similarities and Differences in Once-a-Week TV Shows Popular with African American Men and All U.S. Men
      • Table 9-22: Most Popular Once-a-Week TV Programs, African American Women vs. All U.S. Women
      • Table 9-23: Similarities and Differences in Once-a-Week TV Shows Popular with African American Women and All U.S. Women
      • Greater Disparity in Cable TV Program Choices of Women
      • Table 9-24: Most Popular Cable TV Programs, African American Women vs. All U.S Women.
      • Table 9-25: Similarities and Differences in Cable TV Shows Popular with African American Women and All U.S. Women
      • New Family-Oriented Cable Outlets Take on BET

    • Radio
      • Black Women Most Likely to Tune in Radio
      • Table 9-26: Radio Listening by Daypart, African Americans vs. All U.S.
      • Adults by Gender
      • Radio Format Preferences Distinct
      • Table 9-27: Most Popular Radio Formats, African American Men vs. All U.S. Men
      • Table 9-28: Most Popular Radio Formats, African American Women vs. All
      • U.S. Women
      • Talk Radio Seen as Next Frontier for African American Radio

    • Impact of the Internet on Media Usage
      • Internet Begins to Weaken Appeal of Traditional Media among African Americans
      • Table 9-29: Impact of the Internet on African American Media Usage by
      • Gender
      • Online Media Activities Listed
      • Table 9-30: Online Media Activities Last 30 Days, African American Men vs.
      • All U.S. Men
      • Table 9-31: Online Media Activities Last 30 Days, African American Women vs. All U.S Women.
      • Table 9-32: Websites Visited Last 30 Days, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults
      • Table 9-33: Websites Visited Last 30 Days, African American Men vs. All U.S. Men
      • Table 9-34: Websites Visited Last 30 Days, African American Women vs.
      • All U.S. Women

    Section 4 Key Trends in the African American Market
    Chapter 10 Marketing and Advertising Trends Overview of Marketing Strategies

    • Some Observers Perceive Lack of Attention to African American Market
    • African American Marketing Seen as Losing Ground to Hispanic `Campaigns
    • Targeted Marketing Still Seen as Vital
    • Study Finds Race Matters in African American Marketing Strategies
    • Hip-Hop Culture Continues to Drive Many Campaigns
    • Outdoor Advertising Gets Nod from African Americans
    • Table 10-1: Attitudes of African Americans toward Outdoor Advertising, by Gender
    • Traditional African American Marketing Strategies Still Used Marketing Case Studies
      • Harley-Davidson Looks to African Americans
      • Verizon Speaks to African American Entrepreneurs
      • American Airlines Reaches Out to African American Consumers
      • McDonald’s Goes High-Tech with “Fruit Buzz” to Attract African American Women
      • Toyota Goes Online to Reach Black Consumers

    Chapter 11 African American Buying Power Aggregate Expenditures of African American Consumer Units

    • African American Consumers Key to Profits in Many Industries and Product Areas
    • Table 11-1: Consumer Expenditure Categories with Higher than Expected Share of Aggregate Expenditures by African American Households
    • Food Industry Depends Heavily on African American Consumers
    • Table 11-2: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by African American Consumer Units for Food and Beverages
    • African Americans Spend Nearly $11 Billion on Household Furnishings and Equipment
    • Table 11-3: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by African American Consumer Units for Household Furnishings and Equipment
    • Apparel Expenditures Approach $22 Billion
    • Table 11-4: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by African American Consumer Units for Apparel
    • African American Consumer Units Spend $74 Billion for Vehicles and Related Expenses
    • Table 11-5: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by African American Consumer Units for Vehicle Purchases and Related Expenses
    • Consumer Electronics and Personal-Care Products Other Key Areas
    • Table 11-6: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by African American Consumer Units for Entertainment
    • Table 11-7: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by African American Consumers for Personal- Care Products and Services, Reading Materials, and Education
    • African American Buying Power
      • Buying Power Used as Measure of African American Market
      • African American Buying Power at $762 Billion
      • Table 11-8: African American Buying Power by Key Consumer Segment, 2005
      • African American Buying Power Will Reach $981 Billion in 2010
      • Table 11-9: Projected Growth in African American Buying Power, 2005-2010

    Chapter 12 Trends and Opportunities Strategic Trends

    • African and West Indian Immigrants Change Profile of Key Metro Markets
    • African Americans Keep Moving to the South and Flocking to the Suburbs
    • Table 12-1: Domestic Migration by African Americans across Regions of the United States, 1997-2004
    • Figure 12-1: Net Migration by African Americans, Central Cities vs. Suburbs, 2001-2003
    • Emerging Opportunities
      • African American Market Still Outpaces Hispanic Market in Key Areas
      • Table 12-2: Comparison of Key Demographic Characteristics of African Americans and Hispanics African American Market Offers Growing Opportunities for Travel Industry
      • Figure 12-2: Attitudes toward Foreign Travel, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults African Americans Prime Customers for New Technology
      • Figure 12-3: Percent of Households Planning to Buy New Computer in Next
      • 18 Months, African Americans vs. All Households
      • Marketers See Increasing Potential in Faith-Based Segment of African American Market
      • Figure 12-4: Percent Believing It Is Important to Attend Religious Services, African Americans vs. All U.S. Adults
      • Affluent African Americans Continue to Offer Increasing Promise
      • Table 12-3: Growth in Number of People with Income of $50,000 or More, African Americans vs. All, 1994 vs.2004

    Appendix I Geographic Definitions
    Appendix II: Addresses of Selected U.S. African American Market Resources

    Abstract:

    The U.S. African American Market, the 6th edition of this Packaged Facts report, analyzes the consumer behavior and attitudes of the 38 million African American consumers, who have approximately the same purchasing power as Hispanics in the United States and wield robust purchasing power in many major metropolitan markets. The report begins with a section analyzing key demographic characteristics of the African American market such as population growth rates. The report continues with an in-depth analysis of the consumer behavior of African Americans and provides an overview of consumer expenditure patterns, shopping behavior, and profiles of consumer attitudes in key areas including food, health and pharmaceuticals, and technology and the Internet. Separate chapters analyze regional differences in African American consumer behavior and provide an in-depth look at African American families as a consumer unit. The next section includes a chapter on how African Americans spend leisure time—including an analysis of home entertainment activities, movie-going patterns, and vacation and travel preferences—and a chapter on media usage by Black consumers. The final section identifies key trends in the African American market, including buying power growth rates, emerging marketing strategies, and strategic trends and opportunities.

    Multicultural marketers have appropriately assigned a high priority to the Hispanic market because Hispanics have emerged as the population segment expected to grow most rapidly in coming decades. However, the African American market remains highly important because it includes segments with the potential to outperform the purchasing power of their Hispanic counterparts. For example, there are significantly more African American families with an income of $75,000 or more (1.9 million vs. 1.6 million). The African American population has fewer married-couple families, but their mean income is nearly 17% higher than Hispanic married couples because African Americans are more likely to have both husband and wife in the labor force.

    Report Methodology
    The information in The U.S. African American Market is based on both primary and secondary research. Primary research involved interviews with experts, public relations and industry analysts in firms that specialize in African American market research. Secondary research entailed data-gathering from relevant trade, business, and government sources, including company literature.

    About the Authors
    Dr. Robert Brown and Ms. Ruth Washton have written more than 25 Packaged Facts reports analyzing demographic trends and marketing strategies in key consumer segments. Topics have ranged from kids to mature consumers to multicultural groups such as Hispanics and African Americans. Dr. Brown and Ms. Washton have co-authored several Financial Times Business Reports on strategic business issues and have provided market and competitor intelligence studies for clients in a variety of industries. Dr. Brown has a B.S. from Georgetown University and a Ph.D. degree from The George Washington University. Ms. Washton has a B.A from Skidmore College and an M.A. from the State University of New York.

    What You’ll Get in this Report
    Find out about the similarities and differences in African American consumers living in different regions of the country. Understand the unique dynamics of consumer behavior within the African American family. Discover how technology and the Internet are changing the consumer behavior and media usage habits of African Americans.

    Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.

    How You Will Benefit from this Report
    If your company is interested in reaching the lucrative African American consumer, you will find this report invaluable, as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight about African American consumers not offered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the current demographic profile of the African American population. Contributing to that understanding will be a complete analysis of data from published and trade sources, and in-depth examinations of the economic and societal trends that influence the consumer behaviors of this large and influential segment of the population.

    This report will help:

    • Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for African American consumers.
    • Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for products targeting the African American consumer.
    • Advertising agencies to develop messages and images that compel African Americans to purchase these products.
    • Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships.
    • Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.

    Get full details about this report >

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