The U.S. Market for Whole Grain and High Fiber Foods

Apr 1, 2005
256 Pages - Pub ID: LA1062042
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Chapter 1: Executive Summary
  • Scope and Methodology
    • Scope of Report
    • Report Methodology

  • Introduction
    • The Next Big Thing, Again
    • Definition of Terms
    • Whole Grain
    • High Fiber
    • 90% of Americans Don’t Get Fiber RDA
    • 3% of Calories Consumed in U.S. from Whole Grains

  • The Market
    • Sales to Near $7.5 Billion in 2009
    • Market Share by Product Category
    • Figure 1-1: Share of U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Foods by Product Category, 2000 vs. 2004 (percent)
    • Market Share by Retail Channel
    • Government, Major Marketers Commit to Whole Grains
    • Whole Grains in the Post-Low-Carb Landscape

  • The Marketers
    • Conglomerates Dominate Market
    • Lesser-Known Players Also Compete
    • Leading Players by Market Share
    • George Weston Is Top Sales Gainer
    • Key Considerations: Supply and Formulation Issues
    • Line Extensions and Brand Leverage

  • Marketing and New Product Trends
    • Preventive Health, Weight Loss Are Most Important Angles
    • Education Is Key to New Campaigns
    • Revamping Grain/Fiber Packaging, Tag Lines
    • Familiar Brands, New Formulations
    • Raw Ingredients Aiming to Improve Whole Grain Taste Profile

  • The Consumer
    • 62% of Adults Are Fiber-Conscious
    • 49% Choose High Fiber Cold Cereals

  • Looking Ahead
    • Trends & Opportunities

Chapter 2: Introduction

  • Market Definition
    • Scope of Report
    • Seven Product Categories
    • Cereals
    • Snacks
    • Baked Goods
    • Grains & Beans
    • Beverages
    • Pasta
    • Flour

  • The Science of Whole Grains and High Fiber
    • The Next Big Thing, Again
    • Definition of Terms
    • Whole Grain
    • High Fiber
    • Natural Sources vs. Supplements
    • Whole Grains and Fiber Prevent Variety of Illnesses

  • Whole Grains, High Fiber, and the American Diet
    • 90% of Americans Don’t Get Fiber RDA
    • 3% of Calories Consumed in U.S. from Whole Grains
    • Obesity Among Leading Causes of Death in 2005
    • The Atkins Effect: Per Capita Flour Consumption in Decline
    • “Matriarch” Sets Household Health
    • Meals On the Run, Outside the Home Growing Trends

  • Government, Industry, and Foodservice Responses
    • New Food Guidelines, Revised Pyramid in 2005
    • Possible Changes to Food Labeling
    • Whole Grains Council Seeks New Approach
    • Who’s Responsible for “Obesity Foods”?
    • “Healthy” Vending Machines and Advertising Changes
    • Restaurants, Incorporating More Whole Grain, Healthful Options

Chapter 3: The Market

  • Market Size and Growth
    • Methodology for Estimates
    • U.S. Retail Sales Approach $4.8 Billion
    • Figure 3-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Foods, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Cereals Decline Along with Wider Market
    • Snacks on the Rise, Buoyed by Snack & Sports Bar Trends
    • Whole Grain Baked Goods Outpace Refined Market
    • Grains and Beans Are Slow But Steady Performers
    • Fiber-Boosted Beverages a Surprising Performer
    • Pasta Bounces Back from Downward Trend
    • Flour Manages Slight Growth in Weak Market
    • Market Share by Product Category
    • Figure 3-2: Share of U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Foods by Product Category, 2000 vs. 2004 (percent)
    • Market Share by Retail Channel
    • Figure 3-3: Share of U.S. Whole Grain and High Fiber Food Sales by Retail Outlet Type, 2004 (percent)
    • Table 3-1: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Foods, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-2: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Cereal, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-3: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Snacks, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-4: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Baked Goods, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-5: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Grains and Beans, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-6: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Beverages, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-7: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Pasta, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 3-8: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Flour, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)

  • Factors to Market Growth
    • Government, Major Marketers Commit to Whole Grains
    • Whole Grains in the Post-Low-Carb Landscape
    • Leading Low-Carb Plans Change Their Tune
    • Low-Carb Benefits Without the Low-Carb Label
    • Shift Away from “Obesity Foods” Driven by Bottom Line, Wall Street Anxiety
    • Mainstream America Wakes Up to Natural and Organic Foods
    • Whole Grains Add Value to Convenience Foods
    • More Demand for Value-Added Foods, High Quality Ingredients
    • High-Tech Ingredient Development Merges Taste and Good Health

  • Projected Market Growth
    • Sales to Near $7.5 Billion in 2009
    • Table 3-9: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Foods, 2004-2009 (in millions of dollars)
    • Early Spike in Cereals from Whole Grain Conversion
    • Table 3-10: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Cereal, 2004-2009 (in millions of dollars)
    • Snacks Off to a Slower Start
    • Table 3-11: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Snacks, 2004-2009 (in millions of dollars)
    • Increasing Growth in Baked Goods
    • Table 3-12: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Baked Goods, 2004-2009 (in millions of dollars)
    • Brown Rice Sales to Drive Grains/Beans Category
    • Table 3-13: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Grains/Beans, 2004-2009 (in millions of dollars)
    • Slowing Growth in Beverages
    • Table 3-14: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Beverages, 2004-2009 (in millions of dollars)
    • Whole Grain/High Fiber Pasta a Hard Sell
    • Table 3-15: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Pasta, 2004-2009 (in millions of dollars)
    • Whole Grain a Bright Spot in Sagging Flour Market
    • Table 3-16: U.S. Retail Sales of Whole Grain and High Fiber Flour, 2004-2009 (in millions of dollars)

Chapter 4: The Marketers

  • Overview
    • Conglomerates Dominate Market
    • Lesser-Known Players Also Compete
    • Table 4-1: U.S. Market for Whole Grain and High Fiber Foods: Selected Marketers and Leading Brands, 2004

  • Marketer and Brand Shares
    • Methodology for Estimates
    • Leading Whole Grain Players by Market Share
    • Figure 4-1: Top Marketers of Whole Grain and High Fiber Foods, 2004 (percent)
    • George Weston Is Top Sales Gainer
    • Leading Marketers of Whole Grain and High Fiber Cereals
    • Leading Whole Grain and High Fiber Snack Marketers
    • Leading Marketers of Whole Grain and High Fiber Baked Goods
    • Top Marketers of Whole Grain Beans and Grains
    • Top Whole Grain and High Fiber Beverage Marketers
    • Market Leaders in Whole Grain and High Fiber Pasta
    • Leading Marketers of Whole Grain and High Fiber Flour
    • Table 4-2: Top Marketers of Whole Grain and High Fiber Foods by IRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share: 2000 vs. 2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-3: Top Marketers of Whole Grain and High Fiber Foods by Net Sales Gains, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-4: Top Marketers and Brands of Whole Grain and High Fiber Cereal by IRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share: 2000 vs. 2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-5: Top Marketers of Whole Grain and High Fiber Cereal by Compound Annual Growth Rate, 2000-2004 (percent)
    • Table 4-6: Top Marketers and Brands of Whole Grain and High Fiber Snacks by Market Share: 2000 vs. 2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-7: Top Marketers and Brands of Whole Grain and High Fiber Baked Goods by IRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share: 2000 vs. 2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-8: Top Marketers of Whole Grain and High Fiber Baked Goods by Compound Annual Growth Rate, 2000-2004 (percent)
    • Table 4-9: Top Marketers and Brands of Whole Grain and High Fiber Grains and Beans by Market Share: 2000 vs. 2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-10: Top Marketers and Brands of High Fiber Beverages by Market Share: 2000 vs. 2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-11: Top Marketers and Brands of Whole Grain and High Fiber Pasta by IRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share: 2000 vs. 2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-12: Top Marketers of Whole Grain and High Fiber Pasta by Compound Annual Growth Rate, 2000-2004 (percent)
    • Table 4-13: IRI-Tracked Sales of New World Pasta’s Healthy Harvest Brands, 2001-2004 (in dollars)
    • Table 4-14: Top Marketers and Brands of Whole Grain and High Fiber Flour by Market Share: 2000 vs. 2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 4-15: Top Marketers of Whole Grain and High Fiber Flour by Compound Annual Growth Rate, 2000-2004 (percent)

  • The Competitive Situation
    • Key Considerations: Supply and Formulation Issues
    • Line Extensions and Brand Leverage
    • Alliances with Health and Diet Gurus
    • Consumer Perceptions of Market Giants vs. Specialists
    • Losing Out to Private Label

Chapter 5: Competitor Profiles

  • Competitor Profile: General Mills, Inc.
    • Corporate Overview
    • Leader in Whole Grain and High Fiber Foods
    • Weight Loss and Whole Grains
    • Shortcomings and Challenges Ahead

  • Competitor Profile: George Weston Bakeries, Inc.
    • Corporate Overview
    • Strong Growth in Brands with Whole Grain Options

  • Competitor Profile: Hodgson Mill, Inc.
    • Corporate Overview
    • Wide Variety of Whole Grain/High Fiber Products
    • “David and Goliath”

  • Competitor Profile: Kellogg Company
    • Corporate Overview
    • Number-One In Cereal, Trailing in Whole Grains
    • More “Healthy Beginnings”
    • More Surprises in Fortification to Come

  • Competitor Profile: Kraft Foods North America
    • Corporate Overview
    • “Fat” Foods Under Fire
    • Limited Whole Grain/High Fiber Marketing
    • Opportunities and Limitations for Whole Grain Growth

  • Competitor Profile: New World Pasta Company
    • Corporate Overview
    • Limited, But Innovative Whole Grain/High Fiber Products
    • Fighting Off American Italian Pasta Co.

  • Competitor Profile: Quaker (PepsiCo Beverages & Foods)
    • Corporate Overview
    • Leader in Whole Grain Oats
    • More of the Same?

  • Competitor Profile: Sara Lee Bakery Group
    • Corporate Overview
    • Riding Out Low-Carb, Embracing Whole Grain

Chapter 6: Marketing, New Product, and Retail Trends

  • Marketing Trends
    • Preventive Health, Weight Loss Are Most Important Angles
    • Education Is Key to New Campaigns
    • Revamping Grain/Fiber Packaging, Tag Lines
    • Reaching Out to Parents

  • New Product Trends
    • Familiar Brands, New Formulations
    • Raw Ingredients Aiming to Improve Whole Grain Taste Profile
    • In the Morning and On the Go
    • Fortified Foods: Bulking Up Whole Grain’s Benefits
    • Targeted Products
    • Other Food Categories Following Whole Grain
    • Figure 6-1: Number of New Foods and Beverages with “High Fiber” Package Tags, 1999-2004 (number)
    • Table 6-1: Marketers and Brands of Whole Grain and High Fiber Foods: Selected New Product Introductions, 2004-2005

  • Advertising and Promotion
    • Consumer Advertising Overview
    • Whole Grain Advertising Positioning
    • Playing on Fiber/Grain Preconceptions
    • Potato Board Campaign a Model for Other “Low-Carb Casualties”

  • Retail Trends
    • Whole Grain and High Fiber Retail Overview
    • Figure 6-2: Share of U.S. Whole Grain and High Fiber Food Sales by Retail Outlet Type, 2004 (percent)
    • In-Store Bakeries Gaining Market Share
    • Lessons Learned from Low-Carb
    • “Bulking Up” With Health and Natural Food Stores

Chapter 7: The Consumer

  • Consumer Overview
    • Note on Simmons Market Research Bureau Consumer Data
    • 62% of Adults Are Fiber-Conscious
    • 49% Choose High Fiber Cold Cereals
    • Figure 7-1: Percent of Adults Who Most Often Use Selected Fiber Products by Type, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Fiber vs. Fun Cereals
    • Granola vs. Energy Bars
    • Brownberry and Earth Grains Have Strongest Fiber Draw
    • Upscale and Urban Skew for Grain Crackers
    • Distinct Demographics for Whole Wheat Flour
    • Blacks at Index of 132 for Brown Rice
    • Table 7-1: Demographics for Adults Who Agree with Statement: I Try To Get Plenty of Fiber in My Diet, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-2: Demographics for Adults Who Strongly Agree with Statement: I Try To Get Plenty of Fiber in My Diet, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-3: Demographics for Adults Who Most Often Use Fiber Products by Type: Cold Breakfast Cereal, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-4: Demographics for Adults Who Most Often Use Fiber Products by Type: Hot Breakfast Cereal, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-5: Usage Indices by Breakfast Cereal Brand Among Adults Who Strongly Agree with Statement: I Try To Get Plenty of Fiber in My Diet, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-6: Demographic Indexes by Type of Breakfast Cereal Used Most Often: Cold and Hot Fiber Cereal vs. Treat Cereal, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-7: Demographics for Adults Who Most Often Use Quaker Oats Fruit & Oatmeal or Nature Valley Granola Bars, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-8: Usage Indices by Granola Bar Brand Among Adults Who Strongly Agree with Statement: I Try To Get Plenty of Fiber in My Diet, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-9: Demographics for Adults Who Use Energy Bars, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-10: Usage Indices by Energy Bar Brand Among Adults Who Strongly Agree with Statement: I Try To Get Plenty of Fiber in My Diet, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-11: Demographics for Adults Who Most Often Use Fiber Products by Type: Grain Bread, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-12: Usage Indices Among Strongly Fiber-Conscious Consumers by Bread Brand and Preferred Product Type: Grain, Bran, Multi-Grain, Oat, and Whole Wheat, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-13: Demographic Indexes by Type of Bread Used Most Often: Grain vs. White, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-14: Demographics for Adults Who Most Often Use Fiber Products by Type: Grain Crackers, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-15: Demographic Indexes by Type of Snack Cracker Used Most Often: Grain vs. Butter-Flavored, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-16: Demographics for Adults Who Most Often Use Fiber Products by Type: Whole Wheat Flour, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-17: Demographic Indexes by Type of Flour Used Most Often: Whole Wheat vs. All-Purpose/White, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-18: Demographics for Adults Who Most Often Use Fiber Products by Type: Brown Rice, 2004 (U.S. adults)
    • Table 7-19: Demographic Indexes by Type of Rice Used Most Often: Brown vs. White, 2004 (U.S. adults)

Chapter 8: Looking Ahead

  • Trends and Opportunities
    • New Labeling Standards Needed
    • Proprietary Symbols Headed for Trouble
    • Opportunities in Product Formulation
    • Honing In On Specific Health Benefits
    • Playing the Weight Card
    • More “Grab and Go” and Convenience Foods
    • Trends in Product Fortification
    • Snack Nuts and Baking Nuts to Reap New Benefits
    • Table 8-1: IRI-Tracked Sales of Snack Nuts and Baking Nuts, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Snack Nuts Get New Focus on Nutrition
    • Table 8-2: Top 10 Marketers of Snack Nuts by IRI-Tracked Net Sales Increase, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Table 8-3: Top 10 Marketers of Cooking/Baking Nuts by IRI-Tracked Net Sales Increase, 2000-2004 (in millions of dollars)
    • Branching Out in Additional Categories

Appendix: Addresses of Selected Marketers

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