Latino Consumers: Demographic Patterns and Spending Trends among Hispanic Americans, 8th Edition

Jan 1, 2011
192 Pages - Pub ID: LA2848314
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The 48 million Latinos in the United States now wield buying power in excess of $1 trillion and represent an increasingly important consumer segment for marketers in a post-recession economy. While overall spending by non-Hispanic consumers declined during the recession, Latino consumers as a whole spent more. Compared to other Americans, Latinos continue to exhibit more confidence about the future of the American economy and show more optimism that their own personal financial situation will improve in the days ahead.

This new Packaged Facts report provides an in-depth look at the shopping habits and spending patterns of Hispanic consumers today. It also provides a glimpse into Latino shoppers of the future. As more acculturated Latinos become an ever-larger share of the population, marketers may need to address the potential for a significant change in the profile of the Latino consumer. This Packaged Facts report provides important insights into the way acculturation may affect the shopping behavior and buying decisions of Latinos in the years to come.

The report begins by identifying trends shaping the Hispanic market and highlights opportunities created by the spending patterns of Latino consumers. The next chapters in the report assess the size and growth of Hispanic buying power through 2015, provide a demographic profile of Latinos and analyze trends in immigration and acculturation within the Hispanic population. The report continues with an analysis of the financial status of Latino consumers and overviews of their shopping and spending patterns. The next chapters of the report provide in-depth analyses of the spending habits of Latino shoppers in the areas of home furnishings and home electronics and fashion. The report concludes with a chapter on Latino shopping and spending patterns in supermarkets.

Chapter 1: Executive Summary
Introduction
Background
Overview of the Report
Scope and Methodology
Scope of Report
Methodology
Market Trends and Opportunities
Latino Consumers Remain More Confident
Total Spending by Latino Households Goes Up in a Down Economy
Changes in Immigration Policy Will Have Modest Impact on Growth in Hispanic Market
Hispanic Market Continues to Show Marked Regional Differences
Increasing Acculturation Will Affect Decisions of Latino Consumers
Advertisers Begin to Blur Line between “General Market” and "Hispanic Market”
Latinos Important to Both Upmarket and Discount Retailers
Market Overview
One in Six Americans Is Hispanic
Hispanics Drive U.S. Population Growth
Buying Power of Latino Consumers Will Reach $1.3 Trillion in 2015
Mexicans Dominant Economic Force in Hispanic Market
The Hispanic Population Today
Nearly Half of Latinos Found in California and Texas
Latinos Most Influential in States Bordering Mexico
Southern States Experience Fastest Hispanic Population Growth
Top Metro Areas Listed
Mexicans Dominate Most Major Hispanic Markets
Latinas Account for 22% of Women Giving Birth
Family Households with Children More Prevalent among Latinos
Household Composition Varies across National Segments
Latino Households Much Larger than Average
Language and Acculturation
Most Latinos Born in U.S
Immigration on the Decline
Immigrants Account for Minority Share of Latino Population Growth
Most Latinos Are English-Speakers
Influence of English Language Grows
Puerto Ricans Most Likely to Speak English
Acculturation Leads to Smaller Hispanic Households
Incomes Rise with Acculturation
Social Values Vary by Degree of Acculturation
Financial Profile of Hispanic Consumers
College Remains an Elusive Goal for Latinos
Recession Generates More Job Changes for Latinos
Nearly 1.5 Million Hispanic Households Have Income of $100K or More
Latinos Share in Collapse of Housing Bubble
Overview of Shopping Behavior
Latinos Like to Shop
Latinos Make More Frequent Trips to the Mall
Specialty Stores Attract Hispanic Shoppers
Latino Consumer Segment Includes Core Group Dedicated to Trying Out New Stores
Less Acculturated Latino Shoppers Loyal to Favorite Stores
Ads and Product Placements Capture Interest of Hispanic Consumers
Latino Shoppers Less Likely to Pay Attention to In-Store Promotions
Sales Can Attract New Customers from Hispanic Consumer Segment
Latinos Less Likely to Use Cents-Off Coupons
Latinos Like to Shop with Family Members
Hispanic Parents Like Shopping with Their Kids
Acculturated Latinos Turn to Online Shopping
Latinos Want to Use Cell Phones to Shop
Highlights of Latino Consumer Spending
Latinos Spend More of Their Income
Spending Patterns Differ
Low-Acculturation Hispanics More Likely to Use Cash to Make Purchases
Hispanics More Likely to Use Cash to Pay Their Bills
Latino Consumer Spending Highlights: The Home
Latinos Focus on the Home
Latino Households Spend Nearly $17 Billion Annually on Household Furnishings and Equipment
Ikea Gets Nod from Hispanic Shoppers
Latinos as Likely as Non-Hispanic Whites to Spend Heavily on Furniture
Substantial Segment of Latino Consumers Involved in Home Remodeling Projects
Latinos Are Early Adopters
Latinos Fast-Growing Segment for Home Electronics Retailers
Latinos Frequent Visitors to Home Electronics Stores
Latino Consumer Spending Highlights: Fashion
Hispanic Men Care More about Fashion
Latinos Like to Buy Clothes
Latinos Spend $12 Billion Each Year on Clothing
Clothing Purchase Patterns Analyzed
Watches More Popular among Latino Consumers
Latinos Spend $6 Billion Annually on Clothes for Their Kids
Latino Families Major Players in Children’s Apparel Market
Latino Shoppers Less Likely to Choose Store Brands When Buying Wide Range of Personal-Care Products
Shopping and Spending in Supermarkets
Less Acculturated Latinos More Likely to Look for Fresh and Organic Foods
In-Store Supermarket Promotions Less Likely to Sway Latinos
Latinos Shop Less Often but Spend More in Supermarkets
Hispanic Households Spend $53 Billion for Food at Home
Hispanic Consumer Budgets Place High Priority on Food
Latinos Less Likely to Choose Store Brands for Dairy Products and Most Beverages
Store Brands for Many Non-Food Supermarket Items less Likely to Get Nod from Latino Shoppers
Latinos More Likely to Avoid Store Brands When Purchasing Over-the-Counter Meds


Chapter 2: Market Trends and Opportunities
Latino Consumers Remain More Confident
Table 2-1: Economic Outlook, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Total Spending by Latino Households Goes Up in a Down Economy
Table 2-2: Average Annual Expenditures by Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Consumer Units, 2009 vs. 2008
Table 2-3: Aggregate Spending by Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Consumer Units, 2009 vs. 2008
Hispanic Consumers Less Afraid to Buy Big-Ticket Items in Near Future
Table 2-4: Spending Plans over Next 30 Days, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Changes in Immigration Policy Will Have Modest Impact on Growth in Hispanic Market
Table 2-5: Impact of Immigration on Hispanic Population Growth, 2010-2050
Hispanic Market Continues to Show Marked Regional Differences
Table 2-6: Percent Mexicans in Hispanic Population in Selected Regions and States, 2009
Increasing Acculturation Will Affect Decisions of Latino Consumers
Marketing Trends
Advertisers Begin to Blur Line between “General Market” and “Hispanic Market”
Ikea Campaign Integrates Hispanic and General-Market Creative
Levi Strauss Launches Reality TV Series to Reach Young Latinos
P&G Succeeds with Value Messages to Latinos
7- Eleven Caters to Blue-Collar Hispanics
Food Companies Target Hispanic Moms
Market Opportunities
Hispanic Consumer Spending Represents Ever-Growing Marketing Opportunity
Table 2-7: Aggregate Spending by Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Consumer Units, 2009 vs. 2000
Latinos Prime Market for Home Electronics Retailers
Table 2-8: Selected Opportunities Related to Purchases of Home Electronics by Hispanics
Family Focus of Latino Consumers Creates Major Opportunities for Home Furnishings Retailers
Table 2-9: Selected Opportunities Related to Purchases of Home Furnishings, Appliances and Bedding, Bath & Linen by Hispanics
Table 2-10: Selected Opportunities Related to Home Improvement Projects of Hispanics
Latinos Major Segment for Food Retailers
Table 2-11: Selected Opportunities Related to Food Shopping Habits of Hispanics
Latinos Important to Fashion Industry
Table 2-12: Selected Opportunities Related to Purchases of Apparel by Hispanics
Latinos Important to Both Upmarket and Discount Retailers
Table 2-13: Selected Opportunities Related to Discount and Department Store Shopping by Hispanics


Chapter 3: Market Overview
Size and Growth of the Hispanic Population
One in Six Americans Is Hispanic
Table 3-1: U.S. Population by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2009
Two Out of Three Hispanics Are Mexicans
Table 3-2: Hispanic Population by Major National Segment, 2009
Hispanics Drive U.S. Population Growth
Table 3-3: Population Growth, Hispanics vs. Other Population Segments, 2000-2009
Table 3-4: Projected Population Growth, Hispanics vs. Other Population Segments, 2010-2015
Size and Growth of the Hispanic Market
Buying Power Used to Measure Market Size
Hispanics Show Increasing Economic Clout
Figure 3-1: Hispanics as Percent of Total U.S. Buying Power, 1980 vs. 2009
Buying Power of Latino Consumers Will Reach $1.3 Trillion in 2015
Table 3-5: Projected Growth in Hispanic Buying Power, 2010-2015
Buying Power of Key Hispanic Market Segments
Mexicans Dominant Economic Force in Hispanic Market
Table 3-6: Hispanic Buying Power by National Segment, 2010
Los Angeles, New York and Miami Markets Generate Nearly 30% of Aggregate Income of Latinos
Table 3-7: Top 30 Hispanic Markets Ranked by Aggregate Income, 2009
Latinos in Washington, D.C., San Francisco Bay Area and Miami Boast Highest Per Capita Incomes
Table 3-8: Top 30 Hispanic Markets Ranked by Per Capita Income, 2009


Chapter 4: The Latino Population Today
Where Latinos Live
Nearly Half of Latinos Found in California and Texas
Table 4-1: States with Largest Hispanic Populations, 2009
Latinos Most Influential in States Bordering Mexico
Table 4-2: States with Largest Percentage of Hispanics, 2009
Southern States Experience Fastest Hispanic Population Growth
Table 4-3: States with the Fastest-Growing Hispanic Populations, 2006-2009
Top Metro Areas Listed
Table 4-4: Metro Areas with Largest Hispanic Populations, 2009
Mexicans Dominate Most Major Hispanic Markets
Table 4-5: Leading Hispanic Markets by Top 3 Hispanic Segments, 2009
Age and Gender
Latinos Youngest U.S. Population Segment
Table 4-6: Population by Selected Age Group, Hispanics vs. Other Population Groups, 2009
Mexicans Youngest Hispanic Group, Cubans Are the Oldest
Table 4-7: Median Age of Selected Hispanic National Segments, 2009
Latino Population Includes More Males
Table 4-8: Population by Gender, Hispanics vs. Other Population Groups, 2009
Households and Families
Latinos Less Likely to Be Married
Table 4-9: Marital Status of People 15 Years Old and Over, Hispanics vs. Others, 2009
Table 4-10: Marital Status of Males 15 Years Old and Over, Hispanics vs. Others, 2009
Table 4-11: Marital Status of Females 15 Years Old and Over, Hispanics vs. Others, 2009
Table 4-12: Marital Status of Hispanic Men 15 Years Old and Over by National Segment,
Table 4-13: Marital Status of Hispanic Women 15 Years Old and Over by National Segment,
Latinas Account for 22% of Women Giving Birth
Table 4-14: Women 15 to 50 Years Who Had a Birth in the Last 12 Months, Hispanics by National Segment vs. Others, 2009
Family Households with Children More Prevalent among Latinos
Table 4-15: Household Profile, Hispanics vs. Others, 2009
Household Composition Varies across National Segments
Table 4-16: Profile of Hispanic Households by Selected National Segment, 2009
Latino Households Much Larger than Average
Table 4-17: Average Household and Family Size, Hispanics by National Segment vs. Others, 2009


Chapter 5: Language and Acculturation
Native vs. Foreign-Born Latinos
Most Latinos Born in U.S
Table 5-1: Percent of Hispanic Population Foreign-Born
Table 5-2: Percent of Hispanic Population Foreign-Born by Age Group
Mexicans Most Likely to Be U.S.-Born
Table 5-3: Percent of Hispanic Population Foreign-Born by National Segment, 2009
Length of Time in U.S. Varies across National Segments
Table 5-4: Hispanic Immigrants by National Segment and Year of Entry, 2009
Immigration Trends
Mexico Main Source of Immigration
Table 5-5: Country of Birth of Legal Permanent Resident Population, 2008
Immigration on the Decline
Table 5-6: Average Annual Number of Hispanics Obtaining Legal Permanent Resident Status, 1980-1989, 1990-1999, 2000-2009
Table 5-7: Country of Birth of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population, 2009 vs. 2000
Immigrants Account for Minority Share of Latino Population Growth
Table 5-8: Components of Population Increase April 1, 2000-July 1, 2009, Hispanics vs Others.
Figure 5-1: Components of Change in the Hispanic Population, 2000-2001 vs. 2008-2009
English vs. Spanish
Most Latinos Are English-Speakers
Table 5-9: English-Language Capabilities of Hispanics 5 Years Old and Over, 2009
Influence of English Language Grows
Table 5-10: English-Language Capabilities of Hispanics 5 Years Old and Over, 2009 vs. 2000
Puerto Ricans Most Likely to Speak English
Table 5-11: Number and Percent of Hispanics 5 Years Old and Over Proficient in English Language by National Segment, 2009
Wide Variations in English-Language Capabilities across Major Hispanic Markets
Table 5-12: Major Hispanic Markets Ranked by Percent of Linguistically Isolated Spanish-Speaking Households, 2009
The Demographics of Acculturation
Acculturation Leads to Smaller Hispanic Households
Table 5-13: Household Structure, Hispanics by Degree of Acculturation vs. non-Hispanic Whites
Incomes Rise with Acculturation
Table 5-14: Economic Profile, Hispanics by Degree of Acculturation vs. non-Hispanic Whites
Social Values Vary by Degree of Acculturation
Table 5-15: Social and Religious Values, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Political Engagement Grows with Acculturation
Figure 5-2: Percent Registered to Vote, Hispanics by Degree of Acculturation vs. non-Hispanic Whites


Chapter 6: Financial Profile of Latino Consumers
Educational Attainment
College Remains an Elusive Goal for Latinos
Table 6-1: Percent Enrolled in College or Graduate School, Hispanics vs. Others by Gender, 2009
Table 6-2: Educational Attainment of People 25 Years Old and Over, Hispanics vs. Others by Gender, 2009
Educational Attainment Highest for Cubans and Colombians
Table 6-3: Educational Attainment of Hispanics 25 Years Old and Over by National Segment and Gender, 2009
Employment Patterns
Recession Generates More Job Changes for Latinos
Table 6-4: Job Changes Experienced in Last 12 Months, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Occupational Patterns Analyzed
Table 6-5: Occupations of Men 16 Years Old and Over, Hispanics vs. Others, 2009
Table 6-6: Occupations of Women 16 Years Old and Over, Hispanics vs. Others, 2009
Wide Range of Occupational Patterns among Hispanic National Segments
Table 6-7: Occupations of Male Hispanics 16 Years Old and Over by National Segment, 2009
Table 6-8: Occupations of Female Hispanics 16 Years Old and Over by National Segment, 2009
Income Levels
Income and Earnings of Hispanics Analyzed
Table 6-9: Income Profile, Hispanics by National Segment vs. Others, 2009
Nearly 1.5 Million Hispanic Households Have Income of $100K or More
Table 6-10: Distribution of Household Income, Hispanics vs. Others, 2009
Table 6-11: Distribution of Family Income, Hispanics vs. Others, 2009
Table 6-12: Higher-Income Hispanic Households, 2009
Latinos Share in Collapse of Housing Bubble
Table 6-13: Percent Owner-Occupied Housing Units by Population Segment, 2006 vs. 2009
Table 6-14: Percent Owner-Occupied Housing Units, Hispanics by National Segment, 2009
Use of Financial Services
Latino Consumers Less Likely to Trust Banks
Figure 6-1: Percent Agreeing They Are Uncomfortable Trusting Money to a Bank, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Bank Accounts Less Common
Table 6-15: Ownership of Bank Accounts, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Small Minority Own Investments
Figure 6-2: Percent Owning Any Investment, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Figure 6-3: Percent Owning Mutual Funds or Brokerage Accounts, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Table 6-16: Types of Investments Owned, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
High-Acculturation Latinos Likely to Have New Car Loan
Figure 6-4: Percent with Any Loans, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Table 6-17: Type of Loans, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non- Hispanic Whites
Ownership of Insurance Tied to Level of Acculturation
Table 6-18: Ownership of Health and Life Insurance, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Allstate and State Farm Popular among Latinos
Table 6-19: Property and Vehicle Insurance, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Table 6-20: Homeowner’s and Automotive Insurance Companies, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Latinos Turn to Professionals to Prepare Taxes
Figure 6-5: Percent of Adult Consumers Who Prefer to Let ProfessionalsDo Their Taxes, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites


Chapter 7: Overview of Latino Shopping Behavior
Shopping Patterns
Latinos Like to Shop
Table 7-1: Attitudes toward Shopping, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Table 7-2: Attitudes toward Shopping, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White Men by Age Group
Table 7-3: Attitudes toward Shopping, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White Women by Age Group
Latinos Make More Frequent Trips to the Mall
Table 7-4: Visits to Malls in Last 4 Weeks, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Table 7-5: Shopping at Convenience Stores in Last 4 Weeks, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Table 7-6: Number of Times Shopped at Department/Discount Stores in Last Four Weeks, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Top Department Stores Listed
Table 7-7: Department/Discount Stores Shopped in Last Three Months by Men, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White
Table 7-8: Department/Discount Stores Shopped in Last Three Months by Women, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White
Choosing Where to Shop
Specialty Stores Attract Hispanic Shoppers
Table 7-9: Shopping at Specialty Stores, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Latino Consumer Segment Includes Core Group Dedicated to Trying Out New Stores
Table 7-10: Trying out New Stores, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Less Acculturated Latino Shoppers Loyal to Favorite Stores
Table 7-11: Reasons for Choosing Favorite Stores, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Latino Shoppers Have Different Mindset When Choosing Stores
Receptivity to Advertising and Promotions
Ads Capture Interest of Hispanic Consumers
Table 7-12: Receptivity to Advertising, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Product Placement an Effective Strategy among Latino Consumers
Table 7-13: Receptivity to Product Placement, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Latino Shoppers Less Likely to Pay Attention to In-Store Promotions
Table 7-14: Receptivity to In-Store Advertising and Promotions (excluding food), Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Sales Can Attract New Customers from Hispanic Consumer Segment
Table 7-15: Receptivity to Specials and Sales, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Latinos Less Likely to Use Cents-Off Coupons
Figure 7-1: Percent of Households Using Cents-Off Coupons, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Figure 7-2: Percent Responding to Incentive Offers from Product Manufacturers, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Shopping as a Family Event
Latinos Like to Shop with Family Members
Table 7-16: Shopping as a Social Experience, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Table 7-17: Shopping as a Social Experience, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White Men by Age Group
Table 7-18: Shopping as a Social Experience, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White Women by Age Group
Hispanic Parents Like Shopping with Their Kids
Table 7-19: Shopping with Kids, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites by Gender
Latino Parents More Strict about Buying for Kids
Table 7-20: Attitudes toward Buying for Kids, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites by Gender
Research Suggests Latino Shoppers More Attuned to Satisfying Family Preferences
Online and Catalog Shopping
Internet Has Less Impact on Latino Shopping Habits
Table 7-21: Impact of the Internet on Shopping Behavior, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Acculturated Latinos Turn to Online Shopping
Figure 7-3: Percent Placing Internet Order in Last 12 Months, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Table 7-22: Purchasing on the Internet in Last 12 Months, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Latinos Want to Use Cell Phones to Shop
Table 7-23: Using Cell Phones for Shopping, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Catalog Shopping Less Popular
Figure 7-4: Percent Purchasing an Item from a Catalog in the Past 12 Months, Hispanics by Degree of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites


Chapter 8: Highlights of Latino Consumer Spending
Spending Patterns of Hispanic Consumers
Consumer Units Defined
Latinos Spend More of Their Income
Table 8-1: Expenditures of Hispanic Consumer Units as Percent of Before-Tax Income
Hispanic Consumer Units Profiled
Table 8-2: Characteristics of Consumer Units, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Consumer Units
Spending Patterns Differ
Table 8-3: Consumer Expenditure Categories for Which Hispanics Spend a Higher Percentage of Their Total Budget than Non-Hispanics
Table 8-4: Consumer Expenditures Categories for Which Hispanics Spenda Lower Percentage of Their Total Budget than All Consumer Units
How Latinos Pay For What They Buy
Latino Consumers Have Mixed Feelings about Spending Money
Table 8-5: Attitudes toward Spending and Saving, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Low-Acculturation Hispanics More Likely to Use Cash to Make Purchases
Figure 8-1: Percent Who Say They Often Prefer to Pay Cash for theThings They Buy, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Debit and Credit Cards Less Common Among Latino Consumers
Table 8-6: Ownership and Use of Debit Cards, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Table 8-7: Ownership and Use of Credit Cards, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Hispanics More Likely to Use Cash to Pay Their Bills
Figure 8-2: Percent Who Always Use Cash to Pay Their Bills, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Table 8-8: Paying Bills, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites


Chapter 9: Latino Consumer Spending Highlights: The Home
Home Furnishings and Home Improvements
Latinos Focus on the Home
Table 9-1: Attitudes toward Home, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Latino Households Spend Nearly $17 Billion Annually on Household Furnishings and Equipment
Table 9-2: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Consumer Units for Household Furnishings and Equipment, 2009
Table 9-3: Amounts and Share of Budget Spent on Household Furnishings and Equipment by Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Consumer Units, 2009
Ikea Gets Nod from Hispanic Shoppers
Table 9-4: Shopping in Home Furnishing Stores, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Latinos as Likely as Non-Hispanic Whites to Spend Heavily on Furniture
Table 9-5: Household Furnishings Bought in Last 12 Months, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Table 9-6: Appliances/Durables Bought in Last 12 Months, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Bedding and Linen Retailers Attract Hispanics
Table 9-7: Bedding, Bath and Linen Products Bought in Last 12 Months, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Substantial Segment of Latino Consumers Involved in Home Remodeling Projects
Table 9-8: Interior and Exterior Remodeling, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Table 9-9: Amount Spent on Home Improvements in Last 12 Months, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Home Depot Popular among Hispanic DIYers
Table 9-10: Shopping in Home Improvement Stores, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Home Electronics
Latinos Are Early Adopters
Table 9-11: Attitudes toward Consumer Electronics, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Latinos Fast-Growing Segment for Home Electronics Retailers
Table 9-12: Aggregate Expenditures for Television, Radio and Sound Equipment by Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Consumer Units, 2000 vs. 2009
Latinos Frequent Visitors to Home Electronics Stores
Table 9-13: Shopping in Home Electronics Stores, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Table 9-14: Shopping in Office Supply/Computer Stores, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites


Chapter 10: Latino Consumer Spending Highlights: Fashion
Apparel for Adults
Hispanic Men Care More about Fashion
Table 10-1: Attitudes toward Fashion, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White Men by Age Group
Table 10-2: Attitudes toward Fashion, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White Women by Age Group
Latinos Like to Buy Clothes
Table 10-3: Attitudes toward Buying Clothes, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White Men by Age Group
Table 10-4: Attitudes toward Buying Clothes, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White Women by Age Group
Latinos Spend $12 Billion Each Year on Clothing
Table 10-5: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Consumer Units for Apparel and Footwear, 2009
Table 10-6: Amounts and Share of Budget Spent on Apparel for Adults and Footwear by Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Consumer Units, 2009
Top Department Stores for Hispanics Listed
Table 10-7: Department/Discount Stores Where Apparel/Accessories and Footwear Purchased in Last Three Months, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Clothing Purchase Patterns Analyzed
Table 10-8: Men’s Apparel and Accessories Purchased by Men in Last 12 Months, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White
Table 10-9: Women’s Apparel and Accessories Purchased by Women in Last 12 Months, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White
Watches More Popular among Latino Consumers
Figure 10-1: Percent Buying Watch for Self or Someone Else in Last 12 Months, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Children’s Apparel
Latinos Spend $6 Billion Annually on Clothes for Their Kids
Table 10-10: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Consumer Units for Children’s Apparel, 2009
Table 10-11: Amounts and Share of Budget Spent on Children’s Apparel by Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Consumer Units, 2009
Latino Families Major Players in Children’s Apparel Market
Table 10-12: Purchase of Children’s Clothing in Last 12 Months, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Personal-Care Products
Hispanic Consumers Spend $7.5 Billion Annually on Personal-Care Products
Significant Differences in Use of Personal-Care Products
Table 10-13: Use of Personal-Care Products, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White Men
Table 10-14: Use of Personal-Care Products, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White Women
Latino Shoppers Less Likely to Choose Store Brands When Buying Personal-Care Products
Table 10-15: Percent of Users of Personal-Care Products Buying Store Brands by Product Category, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites


Chapter 11: Shopping and Spending in Supermarkets
Shopping in Supermarkets
Kitchen at the Heart of Latino Homes
Figure 11-1: Attitudes toward Cooking at Home, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Less Acculturated Latinos More Likely to Look for Fresh and Organic Foods
Table 11-1: Attitudes toward Cooking at Home, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non Hispanic Whites
In-Store Supermarket Promotions Less Likely to Sway Latino Food Shoppers
Table 11-2: Receptivity to In-Store Advertising and Promotions in Supermarkets, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Spending in Supermarkets
Latinos Shop Less Often but Spend More in Supermarkets
Table 11-3: Shopping in Supermarkets in Last 4 Weeks, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Figure 11-2: Percent Spending Average of $150 or More per Week, Hispanics by Level of Acculturation vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Hispanic Households Spend $53 Billion for Food at Home
Table 11-4: Aggregate Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Consumer Units for Food at Home, 2009
Hispanic Consumer Budgets Place High Priority on Food
Table 11-5: Amounts and Share of Budget Spent on Food at Home by Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Consumer Units, 2009
Latinos Less Likely to Buy Food at Walmart
Table 11-6: Department/Discount Stores Where Food/Drugs Purchased in Last Three Months, Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanic Whites
Latinos Less Likely to Choose Store Brands for Dairy Products and Beverages
Table 11-7: Choosing Store Brands for Selected Food Products, Hispanics vs. non-Hispanic Whites
Store Brands for Many Non-Food Supermarket Products less Likely to Get Nod from Latino Shoppers
Table 11-8: Percent Choosing Store Brands for Non-Food Items in Supermarkets, Hispanics vs. non-Hispanic Whites
Latinos More Likely to Avoid Store Brands When Purchasing Over-the-Counter Meds
Table 11-9: Percent Choosing Store Brands for Over-The-Counter Medications, Hispanics vs. non-Hispanic Whites


Appendix: Addresses of Selected U.S. Latino Market Resources

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